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Internatational Kindle Book Buying

For discussion about electronic reading devices and related issues (pricing, formatting, accessories, comparisons, etc.)
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Brenna
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Internatational Kindle Book Buying

Post by Brenna » Thu June 2nd, 2011, 10:23 pm

[quote=""sweetpotatoboy""]Ah, well not in the UK and you can't buy a Kindle book from another country's store. Shame. Well, I'm glad it's good and I hope to read it in due course![/quote]

Does anyone else think that is the dumbest thing ever? It's e-book for crying out loud!
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Divia
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Post by Divia » Fri June 3rd, 2011, 12:08 am

[quote=""Brenna""]Does anyone else think that is the dumbest thing ever? It's e-book for crying out loud![/quote]

Yeah I think thats super dumb. I mean I think that might be ONE reason to use a kindle..you can get books published outside the US first. That would be a great selling point.
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Post by annis » Fri June 3rd, 2011, 6:40 am

Not being a Kindle owner I had naively assumed that an e-book download would be just like a music one, not region specific. After all, it doesn't make any difference where in the world a digital download comes from. But apparently it's all to do with publisher's rights, so the e-book supplier has to have an agreement with a book's publisher (and presumably come to an agreement over the publisher's cut of the sale) before they can make it available as a download through their site. This can happen with (legal) music downloads too- for example, it took a while for iTunes Store to get permission to supply Sony music downloads to the New Zealand market because Sony played hardball about their rights.

EC told me:

It's region specific becasue publishers are frequently region specific, therefore there's a demarkation of which publisher has the profit from e-book sales depending on geographical location. I am published by Sphere in the UK and Sourcebooks in the USA. So UK readers can get all of my books on Kindle, but USA ones can't. USA ones can only buy the Kindle editions that Sourcebooks have made available.

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Post by Misfit » Fri June 3rd, 2011, 12:35 pm

[quote=""annis""]Not being a Kindle owner I had naively assumed that an e-book download would be just like a music one, not region specific. After all, it doesn't make any difference where in the world a digital download comes from. But apparently it's all to do with publisher's rights, so the e-book supplier has to have an agreement with a book's publisher (and presumably come to an agreement over the publisher's cut of the sale) before they can make it available as a download through their site. This can happen with (legal) music downloads too- for example, it took a while for iTunes Store to get permission to supply Sony music downloads to the New Zealand market because Sony played hardball about their rights.

EC told me:

It's region specific becasue publishers are frequently region specific, therefore there's a demarkation of which publisher has the profit from e-book sales depending on geographical location. I am published by Sphere in the UK and Sourcebooks in the USA. So UK readers can get all of my books on Kindle, but USA ones can't. USA ones can only buy the Kindle editions that Sourcebooks have made available.[/quote]

It is odd how they do this. I have a friend who lives in Annis' neck of the woods and she's just bought and read via kindle a book not available yet in the US, but purchased via Amazon US for her region and was able to review it on Amazon even though it isn't ready for US readers to purchase and review (hope that makes sense). Her review was rather lukewarm and she's getting attacked from all ends, 1) for liking the book and 2) for being able to review it when it's only available for review by Vine folks.
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Post by boswellbaxter » Fri June 3rd, 2011, 1:07 pm

[quote=""Misfit""]It is odd how they do this. I have a friend who lives in Annis' neck of the woods and she's just bought and read via kindle a book not available yet in the US, but purchased via Amazon US for her region and was able to review it on Amazon even though it isn't ready for US readers to purchase and review (hope that makes sense). Her review was rather lukewarm and she's getting attacked from all ends, 1) for liking the book and 2) for being able to review it when it's only available for review by Vine folks.[/quote]


It's annoying! I understand about the regional demarcations between publishers, but I can't understand what is different between me in America buying a paperback from Amazon UK (which I can do) and me buying a Kindle book from Amazon UK (which I can't do).
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fljustice
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Post by fljustice » Fri June 3rd, 2011, 2:36 pm

That is annoying. Authors who retain their own digital rights (a lot of midlist authors whose rights reverted and indie authors are doing this) can put their books on Kindle world wide and their books will be sold in all the Kindle stores. Authors who are with publishers might want to look at what rights they have. If the digital rights are country specific, they may want to "publish" on Kindle outside those countries on their own. US/UK Kindle digital publishing is a big chunk of the English speaking population, but not the whole. Think of India! My book is now available (in English) in the German Kindle store (for 70% royalty) and as Kindle expands it will be in each store.
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Post by Vanessa » Fri June 3rd, 2011, 3:25 pm

[quote=""boswellbaxter""]It's annoying! I understand about the regional demarcations between publishers, but I can't understand what is different between me in America buying a paperback from Amazon UK (which I can do) and me buying a Kindle book from Amazon UK (which I can't do).[/quote]

I agree. I don't see the difference either.
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DianeL
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Post by DianeL » Fri June 3rd, 2011, 6:02 pm

Apparently we aren't lawyers ... A lawyer would not only know why this is the way it is, but would passionately be able to defend the way it is.
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SarahWoodbury
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Post by SarahWoodbury » Fri June 3rd, 2011, 7:47 pm

Traditionally published authors are able to sell their books to each country separately. Thus, if the book hasn't been sold to a UK publisher, then it won't be available and vice versa.

Once again, it's a 20th century model that's not yet adapted for the 21st.

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