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The day you learned to read

Ash
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Post by Ash » Sat September 20th, 2008, 2:27 pm

I am loving these stories!

There were always books in my house (my dad loved to read, tho my mom thought it a waste of time), and I remember being very young watching my sister reading for school. I don't remember being read to, tho I always looked at picture books, until I discovered the library. My parents owned a deli, and on the weekends to keep me out from underfoot, they sent me off across the street to the main library (I was about 5, in the early 60s when folks didn't worry about kids alone). The children's librarian e took me under her wing (I suspect dad gave her a deal; free pastrami sandwiches for watching the kid!) She always had time to read to me, and sometime in that year I was reading by myself. Over the years, she continued to be my reading mentor, encouraging me to read different books, and books above my level, and always talking with me about them. By the time I was in 3rd grade I was in the highest level reading group and was hooked on reading.

Reading was my escape from school and family; I read as much as my mom would let me at home, or as much as I could on my free time. When I was in HS saw the librarian at our branch library, she'd retired but was working there as a volunteer. That was so much fun to see her (and as an adult now, I suspect it was quite a high for her as well).

Many many years later when I discovered the net, I told this same story in a similar thread. A poster said that the librarian was her godmother, and was able to take a letter from me to her. By that time she was quite old, and didn't remember me clearly, but loved the letter. I think of her every time I get similar letters from former students and from parents, and hope that I am as much of an inspriation to them as she was to me.
Last edited by Ash on Sun September 21st, 2008, 2:10 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Leyland
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Post by Leyland » Sat September 20th, 2008, 4:16 pm

I read a lot after school but mostly in the evening from second grade on, because I was running around the neighborhood chasing after my older brother with the boy next door right after school. We climbed trees, went box sledding down the CA hillsides and played with Matchbox cars and GI Joes. I was a tomboy bookworm, I suppose.

My parents took us on weekend roadtrips all the time even we were little, and I always took at least two books to read in the car. We'd be in some cool place and I'd be sitting on a bench, nose deep in book and worlds away, while waiting for family but then get left behind because I'd forget the watch where they went.

Kinda like those movies, Home Alone. My mother, "Where's Elizabeth!?" and send my brother back to find me. Sometimes she'd take my book away to keep me focused.
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

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Kailana
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Post by Kailana » Sat September 20th, 2008, 11:01 pm

I don't know when I learned to read, I just sort of always have! Even when I wasn't sure what it was that I was doing I had a book in my hands... Actually, my first word was 'book'. A fact that my parents remind me of from time to time. I guess I had my priorities straight... Ahem... I was reading before I started school, I know that much. Neither of my parents are big readers, so while I was read to, they never really paid attention to when I started actually reading the words and not just memorizing stories that they had told me before. I read at a higher level all through school, which was really annoying, actually. We would have to read books independently and my friends would come in with typical books for their age and my teachers would make me get another one! So, I went through V.C. Andrews in elementary school... This also meant that I pretty much skipped young adult fiction when I was a young adult.

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Vanessa
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Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
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Post by Vanessa » Sat September 20th, 2008, 11:11 pm

I remember learning to read with 'Janet and John' books. I think I was quite average - my report for when I was 7 said 'Vanessa is now a fluent reader'. I've always loved to read. Charlotte's Web was a book which I read over and over again until it fell apart - my mum had to go out and buy me a new copy as I was so distressed! LOL. (I'm rubbish at Maths, though!!)
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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Leyland
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Post by Leyland » Sat September 20th, 2008, 11:50 pm

[quote=""Vanessa""] (I'm rubbish at Maths, though!!)[/quote]

I noticed EC brought up maths as well (not to talk about it :) ). I'm like Vanessa and rubbish at it, though not for lack of trying - algebra and trig remain great mysteries of the universe for me. My SAT college entrance exam score was fairly high on the verbal side and shamefully low on the maths side. :o

As an accountant, I can add, subtract, divide, and calculate the ratio of a change between two amounts. Excel spreadsheet formulas do so much of the work for me. :rolleyes:
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sun September 21st, 2008, 2:09 am

I don't remember a specific moment either, but I do know that because of my birthday (December) they told mom that I had to wait another year to start kindergarten (sp?). She told them I wanted to read and if they wouldn't let me in she'd teach me. They didn't like that but wouldn't let me start and mom told them to pound sand. Guess who was reading third grade readers in the first grade?

My favorite series was the Oz books (yes folks, there's a whole series of them). I had mom's copies from the 30's (and yes I still have those aging beauties) and loved reading them again and again. Gorgeous drawings and artwork as well.

Ash
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Post by Ash » Sun September 21st, 2008, 2:14 am

[quote=""Leyland""]I noticed EC brought up maths as well (not to talk about it :) ). I'm like Vanessa and rubbish at it, though not for lack of trying - algebra and trig remain great mysteries of the universe for me. My SAT college entrance exam score was fairly high on the verbal side and shamefully low on the maths side. As an accountant, I can add, subtract, divide, and calculate the ratio of a change between two amounts. Excel spreadsheet formulas do so much of the work for me. :rolleyes: [/quote]

I do know people who are good at math and verbal skills, equally, but it seems many are better at one than the other. My brother, who always struggled with reading, got my mother's math genes it seems. Both were brillant with it, and I always wished it would all come to me as easily. I can do basic math calculations tho prefer to use a calculator just because I'm afraid of making mistakes. And I prefer my husband to do much of the check book math as he does it with much more ease and less frustration than I do. Yet I can read and write circles around them all.

Ash
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Post by Ash » Sun September 21st, 2008, 2:18 am

[quote=""Misfit""]I don't remember a specific moment either, but I do know that because of my birthday (December) they told mom that I had to wait another year to start kindergarten (sp?). She told them I wanted to read and if they wouldn't let me in she'd teach me. They didn't like that but wouldn't let me start and mom told them to pound sand. Guess who was reading third grade readers in the first grade? .[/quote]

Misfit, they told my parents the same, so they paid money to put me in a private school that didn't have such rules. I excelled academically, unfortunately I didn't socially, I was always the youngest in school, and have wondered what would have happened if my parents had waited....Our state now has a September 1 rule for kindergarten entry, with an Early K option for children who are five between Sept 1 and Dec 31.

I don't remember the moment I first read, but I have seen the moment when some of my students do. I usually have one or two in my class that are on their way by the last semester before Kindergarten. I've seen their surprise when they realize what those symbols mean when they go together. Then there is no stopping them and they want to know what every word is that they see. I love it!

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Kailana
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Post by Kailana » Sun September 21st, 2008, 4:59 am

[quote=""Misfit""]I don't remember a specific moment either, but I do know that because of my birthday (December) they told mom that I had to wait another year to start kindergarten (sp?). She told them I wanted to read and if they wouldn't let me in she'd teach me. They didn't like that but wouldn't let me start and mom told them to pound sand. Guess who was reading third grade readers in the first grade?

My favorite series was the Oz books (yes folks, there's a whole series of them). I had mom's copies from the 30's (and yes I still have those aging beauties) and loved reading them again and again. Gorgeous drawings and artwork as well.[/quote]

I started school late too because my birthday is in October. So, I feel your pain. That's probably why I read so young because I learned at home and not at school!

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Alaric
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Post by Alaric » Sun September 21st, 2008, 5:31 am

That almost happened to me too.

In Australia (we moved back here just before I started school) the school year runs by the calendar, so it starts end of January and goes to the start of December. The cut-off for admission is July 1 and I was born on June 30, if I had been born 3 1/2 hours later I would have had to wait until the next year to start school.

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