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Pov?

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.

What POV do you prefer in a novel?

First Person
4
11%
Third Person
7
19%
Either
26
70%
Other
0
No votes
 
Total votes: 37

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Sat September 20th, 2008, 1:15 am

[quote=""donroc""]I prefer to write in third and read third, although a well written first person can hold my interest.[/quote]
My sentiments exactly.
I often find first-person POVs stretch my credulity as to what the narrator would reasonably know or want to tell.

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xiaotien
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Post by xiaotien » Sat September 20th, 2008, 1:20 am

i don't mind. i'm only strong enough
as a writer to write in third. haha!

but if it's done well--i can go with
it. i believe maguire's confessions of
an ugly stepsister was done in first person
present? it took a little getting used to,
but once i was drawn in, i was fine with
it.
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Cuchulainn
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Post by Cuchulainn » Sat September 20th, 2008, 1:37 am

I said either because while I think the third person is probably more suited to historical fiction, alot of Stephen Lawhead is in the first person and I'm really into his books right now.

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Julianne Douglas
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Post by Julianne Douglas » Sat September 20th, 2008, 1:55 am

I'm SOOO glad you put up this poll! I'm just starting my second novel and was wondering whether I should try first person. My first novel was close third from 3 perspectives (different chapters). I like that because each character knows different things and that helps shaping the overall story. However, it seems as though many popular HF books these days (such as Michelle's and Catherine's) are told from the first person. I wondered whether people preferred that, but from our sample here it seems as though you don't. I worry if I go with first that there will be too much of the story I'll have to leave out.
Julianne Douglas

Writing the Renaissance

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Tanzanite
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Post by Tanzanite » Sat September 20th, 2008, 5:24 am

I really prefer third person and most of the time, find it more credible. I do like the multiple first person POV as I think it gives a fuller version of the story and events. I find first person distracting much of the time, but there are a few books that I've read where it is done well and I don't mind it. I won't not read a book just because it's in first person.

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Telynor
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Post by Telynor » Sat September 20th, 2008, 5:55 am

I mostly prefer third person, and first person really depends on how well does the author write. For a very good example, try Robert Heinlein's Time Enough for Love, which has what is possibly the saddest story in science fiction that I have ever read.

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Sat September 20th, 2008, 6:33 am

Just wondering, if there are first and third person narratives, is there also a second person narrative?
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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Sat September 20th, 2008, 9:02 am

I was thinking a bit more about my response to first and third person. As well as not minding which vp it's in, I also realise now that I couldn't tell you from memory - even recent memory what viewpoint a novel is in. Michelle, I loved The Heretic Queen, but I couldn't tell you what viewpoint I read. First? probably. :o That's how much it doesn't matter to me as a reader - I'm the same with well written present tense. Hmmm.... that's a revelation to me about myself! I love this forum :D
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Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

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Alaric
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Post by Alaric » Sat September 20th, 2008, 10:03 am

I'm in the either camp, although I can't write first person nearly as well. Flashman is in first person and works because of it (which is also why it won't translate to film very well). But I'm not fussed as long as the writing is good enough.

[quote=""diamondlil""]Just wondering, if there are first and third person narratives, is there also a second person narrative?[/quote]

Yeah, second person narrative is like this:

"You walk down the road and you stop. You look left, you look right. You keep walking."

I don't know of many novels written like that. It'd get annoying if you ask me.

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Sat September 20th, 2008, 10:12 am

Absolutely would agree that a novel like that would be extremely difficult to read.
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There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

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