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What Are You Eating? Or the Last Thing You Ate

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SonjaMarie
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Post by SonjaMarie » Tue November 18th, 2008, 2:17 am

We have duck for Thanksgiving usually (last year my sister and her kids came so we had Turkey) and we have Roast Goose for Christmas usually (last year we had Prime Rib).

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Tue November 18th, 2008, 2:25 am

Rice..it was gross I messed up the sauce that went on it (stir fry)
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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Tue November 18th, 2008, 8:17 am

Meatball sub from Subway for dinner tonight.
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Vanessa
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Post by Vanessa » Tue November 18th, 2008, 8:29 am

Yes, it's usually turkey in the UK on Christmas Day. I think the traditional meat years ago was Goose, but there's not a lot of meat on a goose and it can be a bit greasy and expensive! We usually cook a turkey crown. I remember someone getting us a turkey one year and it was so big it wouldn't fit in the oven (our oven is a range, too!). We had to remove the legs and cook them separately. It was a monster and we were eating it for days afterwards! LOL.
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pat
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Post by pat » Tue November 18th, 2008, 9:33 am

[quote=""EC2""]
most gangsters would not need to put concrete shoes on people who have eaten a full Xmas dinner of roast turkey, 3 different stuffings, sausage bacons rolls, brussels sprouts, other veg, followed by a portion of plum pudding with brandy sauce. (followed by cheese and biscuits and After Eight dark chocolate mint thins, and then a heart attack!)[/quote]



EC, you forgot the potatos (mashed and roasted) and Yorshire puds! A traditional home Christmas dinner from my youth! The thing is, it sounds a lot, but you only had a little of each!


BTW, we realised that we did not make our Xmas puds the other day, but mum said she had two left from our making last year, and we had 2 left so eventhough they were small, that is enough for us this year! Just hope they are all right!
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pat
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Post by pat » Tue November 18th, 2008, 9:37 am

I meant to say that we now have cold cuts for Christmas dinner! I love cooking but in the heat and it is also a day for me, we (as an extended family!) decided to go with cold cuts and either salads or veggies. We have prawns to start, and then Christmas pud.
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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Tue November 18th, 2008, 10:38 am

LCW, everyone's answered while I've been asleep - but yes, turkey is the usual over here on Christmas day, although there is a slight trend away from it now towards other big roasts. A goose as Vanessa says, which was the bird prior to the turkey. People don't cook this much as it's a faff, but Xmas day is an excuse. Sirloin of beef and roast boar are two others that come into their own as well. Large honey roast or sugar-glazed ham joints are part of the paraphernalia as well. My dog would have loved to chase turkeys in the wild. He makes do with pheasants and they make his day!
Pat, yes, I'd forgotten the spuds!
When my sons were small our Christmas dinner was always beans on toast. This was because we always had a family commitment around midday which took us out of the house over dinnertime, but it was never a dinner invitation (long story). The boys were always up at the crack of dawn and hyped up, so I used to save Xmas dinner for either Boxing day or the day after when everything had calmed down!

Telynor, almost forgot to mention, thanks for the Latkes info. :)
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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Tue November 18th, 2008, 12:22 pm

[quote=""sweetpotatoboy""]On Saturday evening, went with a friend to a new vegetarian restaurant (a Swiss chain that's just arrived here) where you pile up your plate from the buffet and pay by weight. We'd been to a chain that worked like that in Canada but never anything here.

It was a bit pricey but the food was very nice.[/quote]

What restaurant was that sweetpotatoboy? I have quite a few veggie friends and they'd probably like to try it? :)

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Tue November 18th, 2008, 12:23 pm

[quote=""LCW""]Do you all have turkeys over there in Europe? It's probably a stupid question but I just thought they were only eaten here in America. I didn't think our almost National bird was popular anywhere else![/quote]

Yes we have turkey here! It's popular at Xmas but you can get it all year round in pretty much any form - steaks, slices, even turkey ham :confused: and it's popular in carvery restaurants too.

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LCW
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Post by LCW » Tue November 18th, 2008, 4:31 pm

[quote=""EC2""]LCW, everyone's answered while I've been asleep - but yes, turkey is the usual over here on Christmas day, although there is a slight trend away from it now towards other big roasts. A goose as Vanessa says, which was the bird prior to the turkey. People don't cook this much as it's a faff, but Xmas day is an excuse. Sirloin of beef and roast boar are two others that come into their own as well. Large honey roast or sugar-glazed ham joints are part of the paraphernalia as well. My dog would have loved to chase turkeys in the wild. He makes do with pheasants and they make his day!
[/quote]

Belatedly, I googled turkey and found out that it's pretty much been domesticated in other parts of the the world since the late 1400's or early 1500's. Almost as soon as America was discovered by Europeans. I learned something new about turkey!!

I've never had goose and would love to try it someday. We have some wonderful ethnic markets here in town where you can get almost anything. I see frozen goose all the time but haven't made up my mind to just do it yet. Beef roasts and ham are also popular here for Christmas.

Although I prefer a big roast turkey for Christmas and Thanksgiving, I don't mind a nice juicy ribeye roast on Christmas day. But I haven't really embraced the whole big hunk of ham yet. I grew up eating Kosher so maybe something is still hardwired into me to be repulsed by the look of a big hunk of pork. I was around 20 before I even tasted pork chop....or even shrimp for that matter. I love those but still havent' aquired a taste for ham yet! I"m trying though as it's traditional for my fiance's family. I was thinking that after his Mom died last year we could change things up a bit but his Dad is determined to have everything identical on the holidays as when she was alive. That's perfectly understandable so I go along with it!
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