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What Are You Eating? Or the Last Thing You Ate

chuck
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Post by chuck » Mon November 17th, 2008, 3:47 am

EC....Thanks so much for the interesting link....sounds like you have a very festive time during the Holidays....BTW Isn't it the best time of the year for the gathering of family and friends... I remember one of the "A Christmas Carol" films;seeing the Bob Cratchit family having a very tiny Christmas goose and finally the scene where Mrs Cratchit serves the Plumb Pudding and it looked just like the picture in your site....The pudding part confused me a bit....maybe the Brandy sauce makes it a pudding.....Right now I wish I had piece of PP...... anyway thanks again.....

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Telynor
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Post by Telynor » Mon November 17th, 2008, 5:32 am

[quote=""EC2""]I've often heard of latkes but never actually tried making them. Are they easy?

[/quote]


latkes are very easy to make -- I make mine with shredded potatoes with a bit of shredded onion (much labour and bashed knuckles are involved with shredding the potatoes, alas!), formed into a pattie about a hand's breadth wide, bound together with well beaten egg. Into the hot oil -- about 450 or so -- and fried quickly til golden brown, then drained on paper towels, and devoured soon after with a bit of applesauce.

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Vanessa
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Post by Vanessa » Mon November 17th, 2008, 8:21 am

Christmas cake is just like a very rich alcoholic fruit cake. My mother in law takes the remains of mine home with her if it hasn't been eaten by the following June! My daughter likes decorating the top, although I don't think the enthusiasm will be there this year as she's coming up for 13, a grumpy teenager!

I don't cook Christmas puddings, I buy them ready made - to make them yourself takes hours and hours of steaming! Miking shop-bought ones takes about 5-10 minutes!

Another traditionally British treat at Christmas are mince pies. It's quite easy to feel quite nauseous by the end of Christmas Day!! Another traditional item is the Christmas Cracker! Not food, just a bit of fun.
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Alaric
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Post by Alaric » Mon November 17th, 2008, 9:29 am

Lamb curry.

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sweetpotatoboy
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Post by sweetpotatoboy » Mon November 17th, 2008, 5:00 pm

On Saturday evening, went with a friend to a new vegetarian restaurant (a Swiss chain that's just arrived here) where you pile up your plate from the buffet and pay by weight. We'd been to a chain that worked like that in Canada but never anything here.

It was a bit pricey but the food was very nice.

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Mon November 17th, 2008, 7:40 pm

Berry flavoured natural yoghurt for breakfast.
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SonjaMarie
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Post by SonjaMarie » Mon November 17th, 2008, 8:14 pm

Great Grains Crunchy Pecan Cereal.

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Vanessa
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Post by Vanessa » Mon November 17th, 2008, 10:46 pm

Roast lamb, roast spuds, peas, carrots and sprouts followed by bananas and cream - round at a friend's this evening - completely on the spur of the moment.
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LCW
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Post by LCW » Tue November 18th, 2008, 1:02 am

[quote=""EC2""] - most gangsters would not need to put concrete shoes on people who have eaten a full Xmas dinner of roast turkey, 3 different stuffings, sausage bacons rolls, brussels sprouts, other veg, followed by a portion of plum pudding with brandy sauce. (followed by cheese and biscuits and After Eight dark chocolate mint thins, and then a heart attack!)[/quote]


LOL!! Sounds like a typical US holiday too! :D

Do you all have turkeys over there in Europe? It's probably a stupid question but I just thought they were only eaten here in America. I didn't think our almost National bird was popular anywhere else!

Totally off topic but everytime I think of turkeys I think of living in KY doing my graudate field work. There were turkey's literally everywhere in the woods and my dog had a blast keeping me safe from them, lol!! She would pounce through the underbrush like a deer chasing them away. :)
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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Tue November 18th, 2008, 2:16 am

We have roast turkey here for Christmas lunch or part of a roast turkey. I don't think we ever cook the whole thing.
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