Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

What Are You Eating? Or the Last Thing You Ate

User avatar
SonjaMarie
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 5688
Joined: August 2008
Location: Vashon, WA
Contact:

Post by SonjaMarie » Sat November 15th, 2008, 7:02 am

Raspberry Sherbert.

SM
The Lady Jane Grey Internet Museum
My Booksfree Queue

Original Join Date: Mar 2006
Previous Amount of Posts: 2,517
Books Read In 2014: 109 - June: 17 (May: 17)
Full List Here: http://www.historicalfictiononline.com/ ... p?p=114965

User avatar
Ellie
Reader
Posts: 74
Joined: September 2008
Location: Tasmania, Australia

Post by Ellie » Sat November 15th, 2008, 11:53 pm

Currently munching away on a fruit salad- very proud of myself for going healthy! :D

User avatar
Telynor
Bibliophile
Posts: 1465
Joined: August 2008
Location: On the Banks of the Hudson

Post by Telynor » Sun November 16th, 2008, 12:20 am

Today has been spent making what is called here in the NE, Gravy -- ie, a tomato based spaghetti sauce. It's pretty much an all day process:

Your favourite blend of beef, pork and veal
Onions, chopped
Garlic, minced
2 cans Hunts whole peeled tomatoes (run through the blender) or Crushed tomatos
1 or 2 bay leaves
oregano, basil and thyme to taste
2 cans Campbells tomato soup
1 can of tomato paste, if needed

Brown meats, onion & garlic, and drain off fat as much as possible. In another pot, put in the tomatos and herbs, and start simmering. Add meat and let it cook. Once it starts to thicken add tomoto soup (but NO WATER), and if the sauce is too soupy, add the paste, and cook slowly. Add plenty of mushrooms if you want. Serve over hot pasta. Can be multiplied as needed.

User avatar
EC2
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3661
Joined: August 2008
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Post by EC2 » Sun November 16th, 2008, 1:22 am

[quote=""Telynor""]Today has been spent making what is called here in the NE, Gravy -- ie, a tomato based spaghetti sauce. It's pretty much an all day process:

[/quote]

Goodness that's a coincidence - that's almost exactly what we had for dinner tonight and it's one of my basics.

Just eating the first mince pie of the season with my last mug of tea before bed-time. I'm a night owl. it's 1.20am here in the UK!
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

User avatar
diamondlil
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2642
Joined: August 2008

Post by diamondlil » Sun November 16th, 2008, 9:58 am

I went to a friends house for lunch and we had a great feast!

Prawns, spanish omeletter, chorizo, bread, barbecued meats etc etc.

BTW EC, I had my first piece of Christmas Cake a couple of days ago.
My Blog - Reading Adventures

All things Historical Fiction - Historical Tapestry


There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4237
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Sun November 16th, 2008, 12:55 pm

I'm still dousing my Christmas cake every week with brandy before I put the marzipan and icing on it!!

I had spaghetti bolognaise last night and this morning I've had egg on toast.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
diamondlil
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2642
Joined: August 2008

Post by diamondlil » Sun November 16th, 2008, 7:58 pm

Mine was store bought, so yours will be infinitely better.
My Blog - Reading Adventures

All things Historical Fiction - Historical Tapestry


There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

User avatar
Telynor
Bibliophile
Posts: 1465
Joined: August 2008
Location: On the Banks of the Hudson

Post by Telynor » Sun November 16th, 2008, 8:52 pm

As a sidenote, what sort of foods are traditional to various folk at this time of year? I know that for Americans, there's Thanksgiving coming up, and then Christmas or Hannukah. I'd love to hear what other traditional foods there are out there. Myself, I make plenty of latkes (potato pancakes) at Hannukah, and generally anything that can be fried in oil for the holiday. And what is Christmas Cake?

chuck
Bibliophile
Posts: 1073
Joined: August 2008
Location: Ciinaminson NJ

Post by chuck » Mon November 17th, 2008, 12:10 am

Christmas cake sounds like something out of Dicken's "A Christmas Carol"......Latkes sounds delicious......Has anybody out there experienced Plumb Pudding?.....I would love to give it a go.......

User avatar
EC2
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3661
Joined: August 2008
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Post by EC2 » Mon November 17th, 2008, 12:38 am

[quote=""Telynor""]As a sidenote, what sort of foods are traditional to various folk at this time of year? I know that for Americans, there's Thanksgiving coming up, and then Christmas or Hannukah. I'd love to hear what other traditional foods there are out there. Myself, I make plenty of latkes (potato pancakes) at Hannukah, and generally anything that can be fried in oil for the holiday. And what is Christmas Cake?[/quote]

I've often heard of latkes but never actually tried making them. Are they easy?

Christmas cake is basically a very rich fruit cake further enriched with alcohol. When it has nicely matured (often being fed with more brandy as it does so), it is covered in a layer of marzipan and then white icing. Decorations are added according to taste, which can be classy or tacky. Here's Delia Smith's version (Delia being a British institution). It's a basic recipe and some people will like their cake considerably more alcoholic, but you get the idea...
http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/the- ... 93,RC.html

Chuck, plum pudding is another name for Christmas pudding. http://whatscookingamerica.net/Cake/plumpuddingTips.htm
It's somewhat similar in taste to a Christmas cake, but eaten hot - most gangsters would not need to put concrete shoes on people who have eaten a full Xmas dinner of roast turkey, 3 different stuffings, sausage bacons rolls, brussels sprouts, other veg, followed by a portion of plum pudding with brandy sauce. (followed by cheese and biscuits and After Eight dark chocolate mint thins, and then a heart attack!)
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

Post Reply

Return to “Chat”