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What Are You Eating? Or the Last Thing You Ate

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LCW
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Post by LCW » Wed October 15th, 2008, 4:57 pm

Now Chili is an American dish, right? Are there any other American dishes that Europeans eat on a regular basis?
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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Wed October 15th, 2008, 5:14 pm

[quote=""1lila1""]Now Chili is an American dish, right? Are there any other American dishes that Europeans eat on a regular basis?[/quote]

It's kind of sold as Mexican in the UK.
There are a lot of American snack dishes and fast food - Tortilla chips, hamburgers (but called beefburgers). All the commercial junk food stuff. American breakfast muffins (like giant fairy cakes?) have made their way over to the UK. New York Cheesecake (so called). That appears in quite a few recipe books. Hot dogs! Fried chicken. These days the UK seems uneasy with its own cuisine. The older generation still love their tradtional meat and two vegetables kind of dishes but pasta and rice, Indian, Chinese and Italian dishes are just as likely to appear on the dinner table - but adapted for UK tastes. Chicken Tikka, Sweet and sour chicken, (both out of jars) pizza or spaghetti bolognse. Younger son and his student nurse girlfriend are eating lasagne tonight. We're out at the gym but will come home to poached eggs on toast.
I can't think of anything American I cook other than chilli, but there are a lot of American influences in commercial foods. Occasionally the cookery mags (aimed at the middle classes) will do an American feature, especially around Thanksgiving and Halloween.
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Carine
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Post by Carine » Wed October 15th, 2008, 5:19 pm

I can't really think of anything specific that I cook that is an American dish, but as EC says there are American influences in commercial foods here in Belgium too.

Tonight we had homemade meat loaf with apple sauce. Which is one of my youngest son's favourites.
I suppose meat loaf is something that is known in a lot of countries.

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LCW
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Post by LCW » Wed October 15th, 2008, 5:39 pm

Yes, meatloaf is a popular dish here too. It's a classic comfort food. I'm looking forward to the cooler weather so I can cook some nice stews and soups. There's nothing better than a big bowl of soup with hot buttered bread. Mmmm!!

BTW, a tip: when you cook chili, instead of regular canned tomatoes substitute one can of roasted tomatoes. It makes a huge difference in the flavor! I happily came across this by accident last year when I ran out of crushed tomatoes. Yummy!!
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Leyland
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Post by Leyland » Wed October 15th, 2008, 7:08 pm

[quote=""EC2""]The older generation still love their tradtional meat and two vegetables kind of dishes [/quote]

There are many home-cooking style restaurants in my region that only serve meat and several choices of vegetables, along with a bread biscuit or a dinner roll. Sweetened iced tea, soda or water is the usual beverage. The outside signs advertise lunch as "Meat & three w/tea for $4.95" or a similar price. The price gets the buyer their choice of one meat serving (chix, beef, or pork) and a choice of three different servings of veggies.

[quote=""EC2""]I can't think of anything American I cook other than chilli, but there are a lot of American influences in commercial foods. [/quote]

I love the basic beef chili made with red kidney and black beans, and with yellow corn added with the tomato, too. Plenty of cumin and chili powder and I'm done! I've got a little recipe book for chili and other stews, but there are so many other ingredients required, that I just going back to the basic one I love. Grilled cheese sandwiches with chili on a cold day just can't be beat.

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Post by SonjaMarie » Wed October 15th, 2008, 7:59 pm

An Apple Berry Chewy Bar (generic) and Toast.

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pat
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Post by pat » Thu October 16th, 2008, 3:28 am

I have loved the topic on Shepherds Pie! A friend here moved out here when he was a lad, coming origonally from the north of England. Here he eventually married a young lady from Singapore. His in-laws came over, and as his wife was working overtime he cooked dinner: Shepherds Pie! They loved it! The next night he did them Ham, eggs and chips! The in laws were so pleased with him! They took home the recipie! When he later went to visit them, he was asked to cook a Shepherds Pie for the family!


BTW. I have just had a cheese salad wrap!
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Post by SonjaMarie » Thu October 16th, 2008, 9:39 pm

Slice of Sausage Pizza.

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LCW
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Post by LCW » Fri October 17th, 2008, 2:27 am

[quote=""EC2""]American breakfast muffins (like giant fairy cakes?) have made their way over to the UK. [/quote]

LOL, "fairy cakes" sure is an accurate description! I never really understood how people can basically eat dessert for breakfast. Pancakes with sweetened fruit topping and whipped cream, huge muffins that are basically no better than cake. I might as well have cheesecake for breakfast! Don't get me wrong, I'm all about my sweettooth! But I prefer not to mix business (healthy well rounded meals) with pleasure (yummy sweet dessert goodness)! :D
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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Fri October 17th, 2008, 2:36 am

I have had cheesecake for breakfast on occasion! Very decadent!

Speaking about unusual breakfasts reminds me of one of the breakfasts that we had when I was touring Europe.

We were in Budapest and for dinner we had a very nice goulash and chocolate mud cake. When it was served up again for breakfast it wasn't quite as appetising! Luckily they did have rolls etc as well.
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