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Worst reaction ever to a critical review?

Got a question/comment about the business of writing or about the publishing industry? Here's your place to post it!
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Alisha Marie Klapheke
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Post by Alisha Marie Klapheke » Wed March 30th, 2011, 7:17 pm

Oh geez. This is all just awful. Just like Brenna, I actually thought it might have been played out in that fashion on purpose for publicity, but now I think it is just a review that turned ugly. I hope I don't snap like that when people call me out. You never know...bwah ha ha ha! (Just kidding here people!)

Celia Hayes
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Authors behaving badly...

Post by Celia Hayes » Wed March 30th, 2011, 7:48 pm

Yeesh ... this epic flamewar has gone everywhere in the last two days. Heck, I even read of it on a science-fiction author's blog. It was like fifteen-car smash-up on the highway: awful, but you just couldn't look away.

On the up-side: maybe JH will hire a copy-editor, next time. Ya think?
Celia Hayes
www.celiahayes.com

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wendy
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Post by wendy » Wed March 30th, 2011, 11:24 pm

The prerequisite of being a published author is a very thick skin!
If you can't stand the heat . . .
Wendy K. Perriman
Fire on Dark Water (Penguin, 2011)
http://www.wendyperriman.com
http://www.FireOnDarkWater.com

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Margaret
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Post by Margaret » Thu March 31st, 2011, 12:55 am

The prerequisite of being a published author is a very thick skin!
If you can't stand the heat . . .
Having this kind of thick skin and the ability to respond graciously to a critical analysis of one's work is the way that many exceptionally good writers became exceptionally good. Nobody writes brilliantly the first time they write the first draft of a novel, or short story, or whatever. If a writer can listen to criticism with an open mind, decide what criticism is valid (and what isn't), and then revise the work so it communicates more effectively to readers, the writer's work is going to keep improving over time - perhaps to the point of true greatness, and certainly to the point of greater readability!
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings (probably well over 5000 by now, but I haven't re-counted lately) and over 700 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

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Elysium
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Post by Elysium » Thu March 31st, 2011, 6:10 pm

I read this yeaterday and it totally made my day! That's one hissy fit.

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N. Gemini Sasson
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Post by N. Gemini Sasson » Sat April 2nd, 2011, 7:33 pm

[quote=""Margaret""]Having this kind of thick skin and the ability to respond graciously to a critical analysis of one's work is the way that many exceptionally good writers became exceptionally good. Nobody writes brilliantly the first time they write the first draft of a novel, or short story, or whatever. If a writer can listen to criticism with an open mind, decide what criticism is valid (and what isn't), and then revise the work so it communicates more effectively to readers, the writer's work is going to keep improving over time - perhaps to the point of true greatness, and certainly to the point of greater readability![/quote]

Very well said, Margaret.

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