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The Worst Thing Today

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Miss Moppet
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Postby Miss Moppet » Wed July 13th, 2011, 10:05 pm

"LoobyG" wrote:Hope he makes a swift recovery Miss Moppet - I've got a friend who is suspected of having a grumbling appendix, and the doctors are very reluctant to remove it, but it's giving her a lot of trouble :(


Sorry to hear that, Looby. I know how difficult it is to live with chronic pain. Why don't they want to remove it?

"MLE" wrote:Glad they caught it in time, Moppet. A friend of our had his burst, and he was in the hospital for a week, getting a peritoneal lavage (washing the innards) daily through an open incision until the bacteria count was back to normal.


Nasty! Yes, I am so relieved that they caught it in time. First case of appendicitis that I know of in our family. Apparently 7% of people get it, more males than females :confused: . Personally I will be very quick to get bad abdominal pain checked out in future!

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Miss Moppet
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Postby Miss Moppet » Wed July 13th, 2011, 10:16 pm

"EC2" wrote:Good thing you got him to the doctors and then hospital Moppet. I don't have any care advice, but can ask son's girlfriend who lives with us as she has just become a qualified nurse (got a first). She's in bed at the moment, but will talk to her tomorrow. Sounds as if you know what you're doing though. Hugs :)


Thanks EC :) :) . We are lucky to be registered with a very good practice five minutes' walk away. Yes, I would love to hear what your son's GF advises, and thanks so much for asking. I've looked a bit online and it seems watching for any sign of infection is important. I've had surgery a fair few times myself but it's always been laparascopic so the cuts were very small and the risk of infection wasn't as high.

ETA: Oh and congratulations on your son's GF's first! That is a wonderful achievement - you must be very proud. I hope it's the start of a great career for her.
Last edited by Miss Moppet on Wed July 13th, 2011, 10:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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LoobyG
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Postby LoobyG » Thu July 14th, 2011, 9:02 am

I'd like to second that congratulations EC, it's an amazing achievement to qualify in nursing and with a first is spectacular :) It's a difficult time to qualify too at the moment with all the government cuts, so I wish your son's gf all the best. I'm a nurse but I work with terminally ill people Miss Moppet, so I'm afraid I'd be no good with an appendectomy - but two weeks sounds about right to me, with a practice nurse looking after the wound and observing it for signs of infection I'd imagine? :) They're very reluctant to tae my friend's appendix out yet because they don't think it's bad enough, but she's struggling along to work and in such discomfort with her abdomen. I really hope they change their minds soon! :)

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Miss Moppet
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Postby Miss Moppet » Thu July 14th, 2011, 9:52 am

"LoobyG" wrote:I'd like to second that congratulations EC, it's an amazing achievement to qualify in nursing and with a first is spectacular :) It's a difficult time to qualify too at the moment with all the government cuts, so I wish your son's gf all the best. I'm a nurse but I work with terminally ill people Miss Moppet, so I'm afraid I'd be no good with an appendectomy - but two weeks sounds about right to me, with a practice nurse looking after the wound and observing it for signs of infection I'd imagine? :) They're very reluctant to tae my friend's appendix out yet because they don't think it's bad enough, but she's struggling along to work and in such discomfort with her abdomen. I really hope they change their minds soon! :)


So do I! It must be very difficult to live with. You are doing a great job BTW, I remember we really appreciated the support from the nurses when my mother was in the hospice for her last few weeks.

Going to buy a thermometer - I found this one on the Superdrug site, hope it's okay. Some of the Boots ones are much more expensive but would they necessarily do a better job? I remember we had the old fashioned mercury thermometer that you had to shake and you had to look at it quickly before it cooled down. My mother also had a strip thing to put on a child's forehead but they don't seem to sell those any more.

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LoveHistory
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Postby LoveHistory » Thu July 14th, 2011, 2:13 pm

I have had my appendix removed and had periotonitis subsequent to the surgery. Don't let him do too much (no lifting) to be on the safe side. He needs rest and to keep his fluid intake up. Oh, and if he's in pain he should take any medicine that's prescribed for it. No need to be a hero when you've had surgery. The hospital staff should give you a bunch of guidelines as well. Absolutely watch for fever, also for constant and steadily worsening pain in the abdomen (started out feeling like bad gas in my case and kept getting worse).

Hope he heals well.

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Miss Moppet
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Postby Miss Moppet » Thu July 14th, 2011, 2:32 pm

"LoveHistory" wrote:I have had my appendix removed and had periotonitis subsequent to the surgery. Don't let him do too much (no lifting) to be on the safe side. He needs rest and to keep his fluid intake up. Oh, and if he's in pain he should take any medicine that's prescribed for it. No need to be a hero when you've had surgery. The hospital staff should give you a bunch of guidelines as well. Absolutely watch for fever, also for constant and steadily worsening pain in the abdomen (started out feeling like bad gas in my case and kept getting worse).

Hope he heals well.


Thank you LH, this is very useful. Sorry to hear you had such an awful experience! I hadn't realised you could get peritonitis after surgery. I am also wary because a close family friend died of peritonitis (not appendix-related) last year. In her case the pain was masked by medication for another condition and the hospital, tragically, made the wrong call. So I will be on the lookout for all of this.

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EC2
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Postby EC2 » Thu July 14th, 2011, 5:38 pm

Kim didn't have a lot to say beyond watch the wound for getting hot and pulsing (as in you can feel the heart beat in it), and general signs of being unwell, which may indicate infection.
When DH got an infection after his stomach wrap operation, he had an elevated pulse and respiratory rate.
She's gone off on a night shift now, and I only caught her briefly this morning - realised afterwards that she probably thought we were talking keyhole, so I'll have another word, but basically same as Looby G said.
Looby, she's hoping to work on the A&E admissions ward at QMC. She's there on final placement at the moment and has been asked by the matron pretty please if she will put in an application to work on that ward. They want her and she wants the job, but it's just a case of jumping through the hoops of the system now.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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Miss Moppet
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Postby Miss Moppet » Thu July 14th, 2011, 6:05 pm

"EC2" wrote:Kim didn't have a lot to say beyond watch the wound for getting hot and pulsing (as in you can feel the heart beat in it), and general signs of being unwell, which may indicate infection.
When DH got an infection after his stomach wrap operation, he had an elevated pulse and respiratory rate.
She's gone off on a night shift now, and I only caught her briefly this morning - realised afterwards that she probably thought we were talking keyhole, so I'll have another word, but basically same as Looby G said.


Thank you EC, I will pass it on. Have just brought brother home and he seems to be coping much better than I usually do after surgery. They have given him some Tramadol which always makes me throw up but he is okay with it so not in too much pain at the moment.

Looby, she's hoping to work on the A&E admissions ward at QMC. She's there on final placement at the moment and has been asked by the matron pretty please if she will put in an application to work on that ward. They want her and she wants the job, but it's just a case of jumping through the hoops of the system now.


Hope it works out for her. It must take a lot of energy to cope with night shifts on A&E!

I have to say things like this make me very grateful for the NHS. Apart from anything else it's such a relief to know that a big bill isn't going to arrive in the post.

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LoobyG
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Postby LoobyG » Thu July 14th, 2011, 9:37 pm

"Miss Moppet" wrote:So do I! It must be very difficult to live with. You are doing a great job BTW, I remember we really appreciated the support from the nurses when my mother was in the hospice for her last few weeks.

Going to buy a thermometer - I found this one on the Superdrug site, hope it's okay. Some of the Boots ones are much more expensive but would they necessarily do a better job? I remember we had the old fashioned mercury thermometer that you had to shake and you had to look at it quickly before it cooled down. My mother also had a strip thing to put on a child's forehead but they don't seem to sell those any more.


Thank u Miss Moppet, we do a lot of patient and family support around end of life care, and when we're able to make a difference, it's a very rewarding thing :) I think the digital thermometers are in use generally everywhere now, they're the ones we use on our ward and I think you should be fine with that one. Bet your brother is glad to be home and getting on that road to recovery!

EC - A&E admissions sounds like a really exciting job, a great one for experience and for career progression - I bet she'll love it! I wish her all the best :) I've only been to the QMC briefly once for a conference and I've heard good things about it - apart from the parking :rolleyes:

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Miss Moppet
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Postby Miss Moppet » Fri July 15th, 2011, 7:23 pm

"LoobyG" wrote: Bet your brother is glad to be home and getting on that road to recovery!


He is actually much chirpier than I usually am after even minor operations, but whereas his health is generally good, mine isn't, so it's no wonder he is bouncing back faster.


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