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Pray for Galveston Texas

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princess garnet
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Post by princess garnet » Mon September 15th, 2008, 11:15 pm

One year there was a hurricane that came up towards the mid-Atlantic region. (I was in high school) Prior to its arrival, the Navy had to send some of its ships up from Annapolis to Baltimore. We had a day off from school--lots and lots of rain fell that day. Fortunately my town is in the middle of the state so the rain was the biggie.

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Leyland
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Post by Leyland » Tue September 16th, 2008, 1:16 am

I just read a headline about the humanitarian crisis in Texas and Lousiana in the wake of Ike. My heart goes out to all those folks who were in the path all the way up to the northern states who are now in recovery mode.

For the record when I was wondering before why anyone would stay on the coast during a huge hurricane, I was born in New Orleans but have spent more than half my life on the SC coast plus five years living in Pensacola FL. I've heard personal experience stories from older relatives and their friends all my life. After Camille - never ever stay close to the coast. After Betsy in New Orleans - pack all the clean clothes, linens and hygiene products, paper included, as possible in your car and go north. As least you can sleep in your car and stay sort of clean if you have to! Bring lots of food and water. If you have room for photographs, that's great, but a carload of survival supplies is more practical. I loaded up my Toyota Camry this way for Floyd because my Mt Pleasant SC townhouse was at the end of Shem Creek which is fed directly from the ocean and vulnerable to storm surge. It takes a long time to get your house rebuilt and I was afraid Floyd was going to kill mine!

My parents' house in SC was two streets and a canal back from the Atlantic Ocean and ended up with a five feet high watermark after Hugo's storm surge. Their foundation and roof held, but parts of other houses were all over their yard. I saw houses on Pawleys Island moved across the creek and resting in the marsh - I can't begin to imagine being in one while it floated inland. My father and brother and his wife rode Hugo out in my father's Georgetown SC office building. The most terrifying sound my sister-in-law says she's ever heard was the high screeching sound of the nails being pulled away from holding the roof down during Hugo's fiercest gusts. Hurricanes are scary and the authorities are right - get far away as early as possible or risk death.

I talked to friends of people in McClellanville SC who had to scramble up into the ceiling of the shelter school as surge water came up to their chests. They had to push children up above their heads as this was happening. There are financially needy people there and they thought they'd be safe since they didn't quite have the means to evacuate.

Surviving the storm itself and then its aftermath takes courage and preparation and a great deal of personal responsibilty. Before evacuating, it is also very wise to check that neighbors, whether they've ever been spoken to or not, have a way out. If they don't, and they want to go, then room can be made. At least that's what I learned to do.
Last edited by Leyland on Tue September 16th, 2008, 1:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Afterthought! Many of favorite childhood books got 'drowned' at my parents' in Hugo - Johnny Tremain was barely salvagable!
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Tue September 16th, 2008, 2:06 pm

A few interesting photos I found on Yahoo...

The first one is of two women (sisters I think) who stayed behind to care for a cat and dog....


Image

Image

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Tanzanite
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Post by Tanzanite » Tue September 16th, 2008, 10:33 pm

Wow! I think the bottom one (of the road) looks more like an earthquake hit than a hurricane.

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Telynor
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Post by Telynor » Wed September 17th, 2008, 5:45 am

When I was growing up, I spent part of my time at my grandparents place in Washington state on the banks of a river. The lower part of the property was all flatland protected by a levee for when the winter and spring floods happened, and the house was perched on a bluff looking down over the flats. The two were connected by a rather steep track, with the sheepfolds and barns about part way down. One year the levee broke, and we all had to move those blasted sheep up the track to the folds, on an incredibly greasy, miserable track. Sheep can be incredibly stupid animals, especially when flood waters are concerned.

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SonjaMarie
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Post by SonjaMarie » Wed September 17th, 2008, 5:47 am

[quote=""Telynor""]When I was growing up, I spent part of my time at my grandparents place in Washington state on the banks of a river. The lower part of the property was all flatland protected by a levee for when the winter and spring floods happened, and the house was perched on a bluff looking down over the flats. The two were connected by a rather steep track, with the sheepfolds and barns about part way down. One year the levee broke, and we all had to move those blasted sheep up the track to the folds, on an incredibly greasy, miserable track. Sheep can be incredibly stupid animals, especially when flood waters are concerned.[/quote]

What river? I always hear of rivers flooding in my state, and last year was a particularly bad year for floods! We seem to have a lot of Washingtonians or those who spent time here on the forum!

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Telynor
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Post by Telynor » Wed September 17th, 2008, 5:59 am

SM -- It was the Snohomish. I remember the year there was -really- bad flooding, and a photo of Snoqualimie Falls that looked like a spillway off of a dam.

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SonjaMarie
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Post by SonjaMarie » Wed September 17th, 2008, 6:08 am

[quote=""Telynor""]SM -- It was the Snohomish. I remember the year there was -really- bad flooding, and a photo of Snoqualimie Falls that looked like a spillway off of a dam.[/quote]

When I was in Elementary school my class went to a school camp for a week and I saw Snoqualmie, which is very impressive, the first and only waterfall I've ever seen. I can remember the name of the camp but not how to spell it, shoot!

Edit: it was Camp Waskowitz, ha remembered!

SM
Last edited by SonjaMarie on Wed September 17th, 2008, 6:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
The Lady Jane Grey Internet Museum
My Booksfree Queue

Original Join Date: Mar 2006
Previous Amount of Posts: 2,517
Books Read In 2014: 109 - June: 17 (May: 17)
Full List Here: http://www.historicalfictiononline.com/ ... p?p=114965

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Wed September 17th, 2008, 10:21 am

There are some pretty scary pictures showing the destructive path of Ike over at The Big Picture this week.
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Sat September 20th, 2008, 2:43 pm

I found this Newsweek article online that talks about the psychology behind people who stay during a bad storm. It's quite interesting.

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