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Pray for Galveston Texas

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Leyland
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Post by Leyland » Sat September 13th, 2008, 1:22 pm

I can't understand the desire to remain on the immediate coast in a house and wait for the force of the surge to knock the house off its foundations and for the wind to rip the roof off. It defies my sense of logic and self-preservation. I never want to be clinging to a tree or telephone pole while wind and waves threaten my existance. I also can't think of any act more selfish than to stay. Emergency personnel will be at risk when they come to aid of survivors, and other family members will grieve for the ones who perish.

I've been in the paths of several storms from the 1-3 category, but ALWAYS at least 15 miles inland. Riding them out inland is very stressful because of the tornado threat. My prayers go out to all people in Ike's path.
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sat September 13th, 2008, 1:39 pm

[quote=""Leyland""]I can't understand the desire to remain on the immediate coast in a house and wait for the force of the surge to knock the house off its foundations and for the wind to rip the roof off. It defies my sense of logic and self-preservation. I never want to be clinging to a tree or telephone pole while wind and waves threaten my existance. I also can't think of any act more selfish than to stay. Emergency personnel will be at risk when they come to aid of survivors, and other family members will grieve for the ones who perish.

I've been in the paths of several storms from the 1-3 category, but ALWAYS at least 15 miles inland. Riding them out inland is very stressful because of the tornado threat. My prayers go out to all people in Ike's path.[/quote]

Well said. Living on the west coast we of course don't get hurricanes (a big doozy of a wind storm on occasion) but to stay and put the emergency workers at risk of their lives is thoughtless in the extreme. That said, my thoughts are with them and hope for the best.

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Sat September 13th, 2008, 2:09 pm

Agreed.

Its just foolish espically in this day and age when you can track the storms etc. etc. I thought I heard that Galveston is like 2 feet above sea level and they do believe most of it will be under water. Um, sorry, but if I heard that news my ass would be outta town.

Sometimes you reap what you sow
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Ash
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Post by Ash » Sat September 13th, 2008, 2:11 pm

Remember that in the last evacuation, more people were killed trying to escape than they were in the storm (Hurricane Rita) I think Houston needs to do a better job with their evacuation plan if they want more people to trust it.

The area affected are in my thoughts, as are the victims of the storms in Cuba and Haiti (I was listening to a segment about Haiti after the three storms hit. Horrifying, much like Katrina in NOLA, except without a lot of press, and even less governmental help if you could imagine)

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sat September 13th, 2008, 3:24 pm

[quote=""Divia""]Agreed.

Its just foolish espically in this day and age when you can track the storms etc. etc. I thought I heard that Galveston is like 2 feet above sea level and they do believe most of it will be under water. Um, sorry, but if I heard that news my ass would be outta town.

Sometimes you reap what you sow[/quote]

Agreed. Especially after the Tsunamis is there anyone who doubts the power of an angry ocean? I haven't been glued to the news but I thought quite a few stayed in Glaveston and then had a last minute change of heart and wanted out. Like I said, the emergency people have enough on their hands.

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Sat September 13th, 2008, 4:04 pm

*walks in with her soapbox and sits on it rather than standing*

Let me inject a bit of "sense" into this conversation, if I may. I say "sense" because it's only really that if you live anywhere near a coastline in the South.

While I have lived in other areas of the country, New Orleans is where I've spent most of my 36 years on this planet. If you live here, you live here with the understanding that hurricanes can and do come our way.

I know it's easy to sit safely in your home and wonder why the hell people aren't getting out of Dodge so to speak. I've done it myself and I live here. As one who has evacuated for a storm in the past (not Katrina) I can tell you first hand that it is a very draining experience. Both physically and emotionally. It was in 1998 when we evacuated for Hurricane Georges. My aunt and uncle were living in Shreveport, Louisiana at the time (up in the northwest corner of the state) and that's where we evacuated. Normally the travel time there is a maximum of 6 hours. During the evacuation, it took me 13 hours. But then again, that was pre-contra-flow evacuations. I was so exhausted by the time I arrived at my aunt's house, I was crying. So one reason people might not evacuate is just the sheer mental and physical exhaustion that takes its toll.

Another reason people don't evacuate is that they know their area better than some weatherman thousands of miles away in another city. As our meteorologists here love to remind us, forecasting is guess work at best. I think people who have survived past storms - or their houses weren't destroyed - know what they and their properties can tolerate. These reports focus on the water levels as they rise, but do they ever stop and consider that people in Galveston and other areas have built or rebuilt houses to withstand destruction?? They might seem stupid to decide to stay, but they might not be as stupid as you think.

The most popular reason by far to not evacuate is sheer stubbornness. This is the factor that kept most people here in New Orleans for Katrina. Those who took this position were mostly elderly who'd lived here all their lives. "I was born in New Orleans and I'm gonna die in New Orleans!" was their mantra.


***Soapbox time***

Another pretty popular reason for not evacuating is people expecting the government to take care of them no matter what. This seems rather ironic when there are so many people in this country complaining about Big Brother intruding into their lives. It's only when people get themselves in a jam that they want Big Brother around, yet otherwise they don't want the intrusion. That's the biggest thing that griped me about Katrina. More than half of the thousands of people who wound up in the Superdome could've gotten out but maintained the attitude that the government would bail them out if worse came to worse.

And another thing... don't be fooled by any reports this time of FEMA not wanting to give much aid. They got burnt big time by "victims" of Katrina. People got aid money which was supposed to help them with food and shelter and instead most of that money went to buying sh!t they didn't need. Like big screen televisions. High priced clothes. All kinds of stuff like that.

**Jumps off soapbox**

If it had come here instead of Texas, I know the vast majority of people would not have evacuated again for the sheer cost of it. My family and I are lucky in that we were able to evacuate to a family member's home so the cost for us wasn't that great. But there are hundreds of people who incur the cost themselves and it's almost enough to break the bank. I personally was worried while away for Gustav that I'd missed an entire week of work with no pay. Thankfully I returned and discovered I'd be paid for it regardless. That was a huge relief for me. But I know not everyone is as fortunate.

I'm not trying to justify peoples' actions by any means. I'm just trying to shed some light on what it's like living here in an area of the country where hurricanes are the norm.

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Sat September 13th, 2008, 4:41 pm

Well if its too emtionally draining for someone to evcuate when their house is gonna be under water then maybe they shouldnt live there. It sounds cruel, but common. Living 2 feet above sealevel? thats what it is right?

And then thinking the gov is going to help them. When the people in charge say get out of dodge get the hell out.

If my house was in a fire zone and the fire was coming I wouldnt sit on my proch and watch it from a distance waiting for it to come to me. Thats just plain stupid. it is what it is.

I hope no one gets hurt but dude, if you want to play with fire dont bitch that you get burned.
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Leyland
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Post by Leyland » Sun September 14th, 2008, 1:28 am

[quote=""Rowan""]Normally the travel time there is a maximum of 6 hours. During the evacuation, it took me 13 hours. But then again, that was pre-contra-flow evacuations. I was so exhausted by the time I arrived at my aunt's house, I was crying. So one reason people might not evacuate is just the sheer mental and physical exhaustion that takes its toll.

Another reason people don't evacuate is that they know their area better than some weatherman thousands of miles away in another city. As our meteorologists here love to remind us, forecasting is guess work at best. I think people who have survived past storms - or their houses weren't destroyed - know what they and their properties can tolerate. These reports focus on the water levels as they rise, but do they ever stop and consider that people in Galveston and other areas have built or rebuilt houses to withstand destruction?? They might seem stupid to decide to stay, but they might not be as stupid as you think.[/quote]

I got caught in the 1999 FL GA & SC evacuation for Floyd trying to get out of Charleston SC and it took me almost 6 hours to get 20 miles because of the failure to initiate contra-flow on I26. I had planned to meet up with family in Greenville SC, which is normally a 4 hour trip along I26. I was alone with three pets and finally turned around for home (which took twenty minutes to get back to) as the first rain bands started coming ashore and darkness began to fall. I turned around and drove home while crying a lot of the way, gathered some sleeping stuff and then headed north toward Georgetown SC along Hwy 17 to avoid the interstates. Anyway, it was truly awful, but a deadly storm needs to be avoided no matter how exhausting the ordeal.

I lived in the Caribbean and experienced a Cat 1 there (being in the eye of a hurricane is a very unique experience), but clearly didn't evacuate to the mainland US for it. I got caught during Opal when the airport closed while visiting family in Pensacola and thought that Cat 5 was actually going to devastate the shelters and homes where I stayed, but it weakened to a Cat 3. Big whew!

Anyway, the point is that living in a risky area during cycles of intense storms is a really tough part of the year. Evacuations are necessary. An individual that has any kind of difficulty coping with leaving during the storms, should move somewhere else. Even if you stay and survive in a relatively safely constructed structure, electricity and basic human needs may not be met for a few weeks by the government in the aftermath of a killer storm. And the National Guard in SC usually comes in right after the storm passes to prevent looting and safeguard property owners until can return. That's a major reason many people don't want to leave - being looted while they're gone and can't get back quickly enough!

Ultimately, I'd rather be safe, so I always evacuated and endured the stressful fatigue rather than risk myself and others during a huge and intense storm. I'll tell you from experience, when you live just a few miles from the ocean in SC, it really helps to know ALL the little country backroads. I found them after the Floyd debacle.

When I lived in southern California, I decided that fire season is a lot like hurricane season. Be ready to go at all times and then get out fast when you're told!
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

Ash
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Post by Ash » Sun September 14th, 2008, 12:49 pm

[quote=""Divia""]Well if its too emtionally draining for someone to evcuate when their house is gonna be under water then maybe they shouldnt live there. It sounds cruel, but common. Living 2 feet above sealevel? thats what it is right?

And then thinking the gov is going to help them. When the people in charge say get out of dodge get the hell out.

If my house was in a fire zone and the fire was coming I wouldnt sit on my proch and watch it from a distance waiting for it to come to me. Thats just plain stupid. it is what it is.

I hope no one gets hurt but dude, if you want to play with fire dont bitch that you get burned.[/quote]

I would never question the habitat choices of anyone. I live in an area of severe summer storms that cause flooding, that take off roofs and take down trees. People do die. But there are enough reasons to be here that we put up with them. Some people live in tornado alley, or in California with annual fires. Some people like the Tsunami victims have lived their for generations and the ocean is their livelihood. Id never make a judgement. But yes, I'd evacuate if need be, and I am surprised they are going in now to 'rescue' those who refused.

There is no question that many in storms have taken advantage of aid - not just Katrina, but in flood regions of the Mid West and in Florida. We have been through these disasters enough that you'd think that the governemtn and aid agencies would have figured our how to disperse aid fairly and reasonably. BTW did you know that FEMA never distributed tons of donated items to victims, but were left in trailers or given away to those whod didn't need them

Speaking of government assistance: This is an excellent book
RISING TIDE: THE GREAT MISSISSIPPI FLOOD OF 1927 AND HOW IT CHANGED AMERICA This is the flood that the song Louisiana by Randy Newman was based on. The flood was so severe and the reports of the conditions of the inhabitants (many of whom were share croppers and didn't have much of a choice of moving) that people demanded the goverment step in. I think one of the reasons for governemtn is to assist people who lose everything in these disasters, and yes, some people might be expecting it. But if you have actually lost everything, and had no insurance or your insurance denies your claim, what in the heck are people supposed to do? Again, distribution needs to be planned out. But I think most people are grateful for the aid they get. The people who aren't, who are out for a quick buck, are the minority.

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Sun September 14th, 2008, 1:19 pm

I dont care if people want to live in those places. However if you live on a cliff that gets a lot of rain and mudslides and your house goes into the water, don't be shocked by it cause you probably knew it was gonna happen anyway.

However, if you do live in these places then you better be ready to move quickly in case something like this happens. Don't sit on your hands and say its too emotionally drainning. In some cases the alternative is death. Or putting other people's lives at risk and how dare you be so selfish to those resecue workers.

I know every year we will get over 100 inches of snow. I prepair the house, and I get ready. This is a way of life. I dont pretend it won't happen. I'm ready for it.
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