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Dog trainning question

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Divia
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Dog trainning question

Post by Divia » Mon January 10th, 2011, 9:20 pm

Ok, so here is my question.

I have a new dog. Yay. But so far its been harder than my last dog. booo.

My last dog I would open up the gate and it would go into the fenced area and do its thing. Well now there is snow and you cant see the pool. So I put a lead in the area, shoved out a spot and put the dog there. It just sat there. grrrr.

I cannot waked up 5 Am every morning and take the dog for anice 15 min stroll. Ain't gonna happen.

So my question is...how do I train the dog that it has to go to the bathroom when I let it outside on the lead.

suggestions?
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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Mon January 10th, 2011, 9:48 pm

Divia, it is natural for dogs to defecate in the same spot. Putting some of her freshest poop in the place where you want her to go will help her get the urge. It's not sure-fire, but the physiological result is similar to putting your hand in warm water--that generally makes you feel the need to pee.

Dogs have a harder time relaxing the sphincter when they feel uneasy, which is common in a new environment. They are always looking around to see if danger is pending -- they don't want to be caught with their pants down, so to speak.

Humans have the same problem 'going' in unfamiliar places. When we took groups out on the trail, I used to give a 10-minute talk to each gender about handling bodily functions in the wilderness. If I didn't, there would always be some poor soul who would go four days without defecating, too embarrassed to say anything until it became an emergency.

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Post by Elizabeth » Mon January 10th, 2011, 10:24 pm

The same thing works for the dog peeing. Get her to pee once in the area, then take her back to the same spot. There are sprays and "pee posts" that might help, although I've never tried any of them.

But the best training aid is lavish praise when she does what you want. It takes a little more time upfront (obviously you have to catch her doing what you want her to do, where you want her to do it) but I believe it's the surest method long-term.

Also, get her on a schedule. Doggies love routine. (At least ours do.) Feed her at the same time(s) every day and put her out at the same times. With lots of praise when she does well, she'll quickly get the picture.
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Divia
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Post by Divia » Mon January 10th, 2011, 10:47 pm

She was able to pee in the area but that was only after she was off the lead and I was freezing my butt off as I stood in the snow.

When she whines I'll take her outside and put her on the lead again and leave her there. Maybe that will trigger it. I dunno.

Thanks for the suggestions.
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Post by cw gortner » Mon January 10th, 2011, 11:02 pm

[quote=""Divia""]She was able to pee in the area but that was only after she was off the lead and I was freezing my butt off as I stood in the snow.

When she whines I'll take her outside and put her on the lead again and leave her there. Maybe that will trigger it. I dunno.

Thanks for the suggestions.[/quote]

Leaving her on a lead and expect her to poo is probably not the best idea or even the most proactive. She needs to get used to the area and know what it is you expect her to do there. I agree, leaving some of her own poo there will help. Also, some dogs need to be exercised a bit before they get the urge to do #2. Every dog is different, so I wouldn't just expect her to behave as your last dog did. They're individuals, like us, and she's new to your home, right? Is she a rescue? If so, she may have bad associations with leads, so it won't help her or you to simply tie her out there.

Try to be patient with her and give her some time to figure it out. Experiment with the routine until you find one that works for you both.
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Divia
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Post by Divia » Mon January 10th, 2011, 11:16 pm

No she was a show dog, who has a crooked tooth so she couldn't do that anymore. :p

I'm trying to be patient, but my other dog was super easy. I miss that. :(
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Post by Susan » Mon January 10th, 2011, 11:29 pm

I don't know anything about dog training, but I do want to know what the new dog's name is!
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Post by Vanessa » Tue January 11th, 2011, 8:14 am

[quote=""Divia""]No she was a show dog, who has a crooked tooth so she couldn't do that anymore. :p

I'm trying to be patient, but my other dog was super easy. I miss that. :( [/quote]

Both our English Springer Spaniels were bred to be show dogs, but couldn't due to crooked teeth, which is why we ended up with them. And, of course, we didn't have to pay as much for them.

I think training is just a case of repetiveness and rewarding.

Do you have any dog training classes nearby? I remember going to some of those with our first dog. I quite enjoyed it.
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Post by N. Gemini Sasson » Thu January 13th, 2011, 12:47 am

Divia - I forgot, but how old is your new dog? Did her former owner have a specific command or routine for pottying?

No matter the age, start it out like a puppy. Take it out frequently, but only for reasonably short periods. When you pick up the leash to take her outside, ask her, "Do you need to go outside/go potty?". When you go outside, repeat a specific command. I say, "Hurry up, go potty." Don't make a big deal out of it, don't let her make it play time until she's done her business. Just say the command a few times, wait a few minutes. If she goes, praise her when she's done. If she doesn't, just take her back inside and put her in a small area, like a crate or gated off laundry room. Repeat at intervals.

Some dogs have 'bashful bladders'. They don't like to do their business with someone watching, but sometimes it's just a necessity. If the area is fenced, is there a reason why you take her out on leash? Is it because of the pool? Have you tried just letting her out in the yard and watching from a window to see when she's done?

I like Cesar Millan's philosphy on dog training because he tries to help you understand why dogs do what they do. Here's a book of his that covers housebreaking that you might find helpful: http://www.amazon.com/How-Raise-Perfect ... 307461300/
Last edited by N. Gemini Sasson on Thu January 13th, 2011, 1:36 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Thu January 13th, 2011, 3:05 am

She is 1 and the people would let her run around in a pen like I do and she would go then.

After a few days she has realized that when we go out in the pen she needs to do her thing. I have to stand there, but I dont have to walk with her like I once had to. Today I was shoveling and she ran away and did her thing.

I am also bringing out a squeaky chicken so she knows that is playtime. The rest of the time its business. I didn't get to play with her today cause my heat is broke so I am dealing with that. But my roomie brought her otu to play, however the dog with the chicken.

Susan, the dog identifies with its name Kabiou. However they also called her Boo, which works well with me since I'm a ghost fan and I LOVE Halloween. So I think its gonna have to be Boo.
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