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January 2011: What Are You Reading?

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Brenna
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Post by Brenna » Fri January 14th, 2011, 6:29 pm

[quote=""Misfit""]And that is always the downside of google :o

Careful if you are ever looking for the Smart Bitches Trashy Books blog. Do not, I repeat do not, just google Smart Bitches. Especially at work :eek: [/quote]

The thought wouldn't have occured to me! :D I just laughed out loud pretty loudly though and I think some people are work are now worried about my mental stability :o Oh well. Thanks for the laughs though!
Brenna

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SonjaMarie
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Post by SonjaMarie » Fri January 14th, 2011, 6:33 pm

I thought it meant "Darling Husband" lol.

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rockygirl
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Post by rockygirl » Fri January 14th, 2011, 9:13 pm

You're all doing better than me. I thought it meant designated hitter! ;)

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Kasthu
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Post by Kasthu » Fri January 14th, 2011, 10:34 pm

Reading some nonfiction: A Woman's Place, by Ruth Adam.

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emr
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Post by emr » Fri January 14th, 2011, 11:31 pm

[quote=""SonjaMarie""]I thought it meant "Darling Husband" lol.

SM[/quote]

In some context I've seen it used as Damn Husband :D
"So many books, so little time."
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Jack
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Post by Jack » Sat January 15th, 2011, 12:11 am

Just got Confessions of Catherine de Medici by Christopher Gortner. Starting it this weekend. Also reading The Moses Expedition by Juan Gomez-Jurado.

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sat January 15th, 2011, 6:42 pm

The Fires of July by Sharon Salvato. American Revolution, set in South Carolina. I've already learned something new, about the War of Regulation. The cover screams romance, but I'll with hold judgment for a bit yet.
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Berengaria
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A Question

Post by Berengaria » Sun January 16th, 2011, 7:30 pm

I am reading The Hammer of the Scots by Jean Plaidy. I'm finding it an enjoyable read and I'm adding to my very sparse knowledge of this time period. A question, though. Edward I expelled the Jews, and Italian bankers who had come to England, filled the financial positions. Now the Jews, being non-Christians, could use usary in their transactions, but how did the Italians, being Christian, make a profit from their loans? :confused:
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“No entertainment is so cheap as reading, nor any pleasure so lasting. She will not want new fashions nor regret the loss of expensive diversions or variety of company if she can be amused with an author in her closet.” ~Lady Montagu

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
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Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Sun January 16th, 2011, 8:42 pm

The Italians had different semantics. Instead of calling it usury, they had 'risk-sharing companies' with a special name which I used to know but have forgotten (anybody out there know?) where one person would do the traveling and another party or parties would bankroll them. Some early efforts at pooling capital, like Genoa, actually had citizens buying shares of stock in a sea venture, originating the phrase "when your ship comes in."

They adapted their semantics to English, and suddenly everything is okay, as far as the law is concerned.

I would also think that Christians could have gotten around the usury prohibition by dismissing it as Old Testament, and pointing to the Parable of the Talents, where the master (loan originator) suggests that if the money given for safekeeping was not invested in some business, it could at least have been placed with the money-lenders so that it would collect interest.

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Berengaria
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Post by Berengaria » Sun January 16th, 2011, 8:56 pm

[quote=""MLE""]The Italians had different semantics. Instead of calling it usury, they had 'risk-sharing companies' with a special name which I used to know but have forgotten (anybody out there know?) where one person would do the traveling and another party or parties would bankroll them. Some early efforts at pooling capital, like Genoa, actually had citizens buying shares of stock in a sea venture, originating the phrase "when your ship comes in."[/quote]

Thanks so much for giving me this info! :)
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“No entertainment is so cheap as reading, nor any pleasure so lasting. She will not want new fashions nor regret the loss of expensive diversions or variety of company if she can be amused with an author in her closet.” ~Lady Montagu

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