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Nominations: February 2011 BOTM

A monthly discussion on varying themes guided by our members. (Book of the Month discussions through December 2011 can be found in this section too.)
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boswellbaxter
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Nominations: February 2011 BOTM

Post by boswellbaxter » Sat January 1st, 2011, 2:14 am

I'm going through some of the suggestions for Book of the Month themes that have been made. For February 2010, the theme will be historical fiction about ordinary, entirely fictional people--no famous people, and no ordinary people who interact with famous people.

Nominations will close on January 5.
Susan Higginbotham
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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
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Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Sat January 1st, 2011, 2:52 am

Whe you say 'ordinary' do you mean not noble? And if so, would gentry count?

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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Sat January 1st, 2011, 3:09 am

[quote=""MLE""]Whe you say 'ordinary' do you mean not noble? And if so, would gentry count?[/quote]

I suppose gentry or upper-middle-class people, depending on the era, are OK--as long as they're fictional people and the famous people are offstage.
Susan Higginbotham
Coming in October: The Woodvilles


http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/
http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/

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Vanessa
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Post by Vanessa » Sat January 1st, 2011, 3:07 pm

Do you mean February 2011 or are we time travelling? :p ;) :D
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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Sat January 1st, 2011, 3:33 pm

[quote=""Vanessa""]Do you mean February 2011 or are we time travelling? :p ;) :D [/quote]

Whoops! Fixed now.
Susan Higginbotham
Coming in October: The Woodvilles


http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/
http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Sat January 1st, 2011, 4:57 pm

What about The Mistress of Nothing: A Novel by Kate Pullinger
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Vanessa
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Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Sat January 1st, 2011, 6:26 pm

Not as easy as I thought! A lot of my books appear to have factual characters in them alongside fictional ones. I don't think this one does, though.

Sacred Hearts by Sarah Dunant
1570 in the Italian city of Ferrara, and the convent of Santa Caterina is filled with noble women who are married to Christ because many cannot find husbands outside. Enter sixteen-year-old Serafina, ripped by her family from an illicit love affair, howling with rage and hormones and determined to escape. While on the other side of the great walls, counter-reformation forces in the Church are pushing for change, inside, Serafina's spirit and defiance ignite a fire that threatens to engulf the whole convent. SACRED HEARTS is a novel about power, creativity and passion - both of the body and of the soul. Hidden history brought alive by a wonderful storyteller, renowned for her Italian Renaissance novels.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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Elizabeth
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Post by Elizabeth » Sat January 1st, 2011, 7:33 pm

In SACRED HEARTS, there are a few mentions of historical members of the Este family, and I believe one of the duke's sisters makes a cameo appearance, but they don't really have that much to do with the story. I liked SACRED HEARTS a lot and would love to discuss it.

I'd nominate RED ADAM'S LADY, but I think it's too hard to find copies of it.

What about one of the Susan Howatch historicals, THE WHEEL OF FORTUNE or PENMARRIC or CASHELMARA? Great turn-of-the-century (19th-20th) sagas with all fictional characters, yet re-enacting Plantagenet drama.
THE RED LILY CROWN: A Novel of Medici Florence.
THE FLOWER READER.
THE SECOND DUCHESS.

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sat January 1st, 2011, 8:27 pm

What about one of the Susan Howatch historicals, THE WHEEL OF FORTUNE or PENMARRIC or CASHELMARA? Great turn-of-the-century (19th-20th) sagas with all fictional characters, yet re-enacting Plantagenet drama.
I'll second that and would make for some fun discussion.
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Divia
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Post by Divia » Sat January 1st, 2011, 11:39 pm

[quote=""Vanessa""]Not as easy as I thought! A lot of my books appear to have factual characters in them alongside fictional ones. I don't think this one does, though.

Sacred Hearts by Sarah Dunant
1570 in the Italian city of Ferrara, and the convent of Santa Caterina is filled with noble women who are married to Christ because many cannot find husbands outside. Enter sixteen-year-old Serafina, ripped by her family from an illicit love affair, howling with rage and hormones and determined to escape. While on the other side of the great walls, counter-reformation forces in the Church are pushing for change, inside, Serafina's spirit and defiance ignite a fire that threatens to engulf the whole convent. SACRED HEARTS is a novel about power, creativity and passion - both of the body and of the soul. Hidden history brought alive by a wonderful storyteller, renowned for her Italian Renaissance novels.[/quote]

Did we read this before? I think we did, but maybe not.
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