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Puppy advice

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Divia
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Puppy advice

Post by Divia » Tue December 28th, 2010, 7:21 pm

I am going to get a puppy, unless I back out of it, which could happen.

The dog books I have been reading have been making me feel like crap. It seems that in their world no one works or has a full time job and everyone is romping with their puppy all the time.

In my reality...I have a job. I will be away from the puppy for 8 hr a day.

So what do I do with the dog during that time? I will be crate trainning the dog, but some say thats not nice to do on a puppy for 8 hour a day. Some say let them roam around the house. Some say put pads in where they sleep in the crate.

I'm really confused.

What have other people done?

And I'm afraid I can't get apuppy sitter or someone to walk the dog while I am gone.
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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Tue December 28th, 2010, 8:06 pm

The puppy can have a room or space designated for the time you will be at work. You have to make sure the pup can't escape from it though. He/she will need a bathroom area, food, water, toys, and the crate for taking naps.

When we go someplace and leave our dog at home we turn the radio on so she can still hear human voices.

One of those bears with a heartbeat (or even a wind-up alarm clock cleverly concealed in a towel or pillow) might help as well.

Plenty of people have jobs and still get pets. Just don't get a breed that desperately needs to be with people all the time. Do your homework and find the dog that's right for you in terms of grooming, exercise, and temperament.

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Tue December 28th, 2010, 8:33 pm

I found a dog that I like and I think will be a good fit. I meet the breeder and her dogs are very quite and not at all crazy like your typical Australian Shperard because she breeds em for show quality not stock quality.

This is a huge investment and I don't want to plop down the cash and then have to give teh dog up in a few months.
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Elizabeth
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Post by Elizabeth » Tue December 28th, 2010, 8:39 pm

A babygate can come in handy to block off a room for the puppy, if you don't have a room with doors. If you can, pick a room with a tiled floor so cleanup, if necessary, is easy.

Some dogs will eat just what they need and others (like beagles) will eat everything you set out in one gulp. When I had to be gone all day I had a two-compartment food dish, battery-operated, with two timers, so I could set it to open two "meals" at pre-set times. Plenty of water in a plain dish.

Definitely the crate with a comfy pad. A regular-size bed pillow fits perfectly inside a medium-sized crate. <-- personal experience here. :)

Kong toys are good--they're hollow hard rubber balls and other shapes. You put kibbles or small treats inside. The dog has to roll them or turn them just right to get the treat to fall out. They will keep a dog occupied for a good long time.

I've seen ads on TV for litter-tray-like contraptions for dogs, with Astro-turf style grass and a tray underneath. Something cleanable would probably be cheaper in the long run than the pee-pads.

If you can find a copy of THE WEEKEND DOG by Myrna M. Milani, grab it. It's full of great information on living the work life and still loving your doggie. :)
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Divia
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Post by Divia » Tue December 28th, 2010, 8:48 pm

I really don't have a room that can be blocked off, that's another issue. I guess I could put him in the mud room.

I went on a dog forum to ask for advise and they pretty much told me I'm the scum of the earth for even suggesting leaving a dog alone for 8 hours a day.

I'm so confused. I really am. A part of me is thinking that I might as well just say screw it and forget about the whole adoption thing.
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Elizabeth
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Post by Elizabeth » Tue December 28th, 2010, 9:12 pm

If only people who stay home all day could have dogs, there would be a lot of homeless dogs. That's what we're trying to AVOID. Pay no attention to the haterz.

One possibility would be to adopt an adult dog rather than buying a puppy. All three of mine have been adult rescues and I can't recommend it highly enough. If you want an Australian Shepherd, there are Aussie breed rescue groups. A dog that's at least two or three years old, particularly one that's come through a rescue group's foster-home structure, will be housebroken, generally crate-trained, and mature, which translates to more easy-going.

And no doggie will ever love you like an adult rescue. Call me crazy, but they know.
THE RED LILY CROWN: A Novel of Medici Florence.
THE FLOWER READER.
THE SECOND DUCHESS.

www.elizabethloupas.com

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Tue December 28th, 2010, 9:20 pm

I havent had luck with rescue dogs. They want a lot for them,a nd most of the dogs I have looked at have massive issues. Plus there are no Aussie rescues around me.

You are right there are a lot of haters out there! Yikes!

I have until noon tomorrow to figure it out. As of right now I am leaning towards no.
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Michy
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Post by Michy » Tue December 28th, 2010, 9:34 pm

I think that, for people who live alone and work full-time, getting puppies or kittens can be a real challenge, since they need so much attention during that stage. Have you considered a slightly older dog? One that is still young, but out of the puppy stage? For my last pet, a cat, that is what I did. She was young when I got her -- less than a year old -- but out of that destructive-claw-everything-to-shreds kitten stage. Ok, well, she did fill the back of my vinyl chair full of holes. :p I got it recovered in velvet, which didn't appeal to her at all and so she left it alone from then on.

Anyway, it's just a thought. Maybe a slightly older dog that is still young enough to be cute and trainable would be your least-stressful solution.

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Elizabeth
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Post by Elizabeth » Tue December 28th, 2010, 9:35 pm

Does your breeder have any young-adult dogs available? In general, an older dog can adjust better to being alone all day than a puppy can.

I'm sorry your rescues didn't work out. I'm a great fan of dog rescue groups, and in fact my first book signing, on March 5, 2011, at Murder by the Book in Houston, is going to be a combination booksigning/beagle adoption event with Houston Beagle and Hound Rescue. There are two beagle puppies in the book, so it all ties in. :)

Good luck!
THE RED LILY CROWN: A Novel of Medici Florence.
THE FLOWER READER.
THE SECOND DUCHESS.

www.elizabethloupas.com

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Michy
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Post by Michy » Tue December 28th, 2010, 9:43 pm

[quote=""Divia""]
I went on a dog forum to ask for advise and they pretty much told me I'm the scum of the earth for even suggesting leaving a dog alone for 8 hours a day.

[/quote] I experienced something similar when I was looking for a pet several years ago. I went to a local pet store that had cats, kittens and puppies available from local animal shelters. There was a woman there (from the shelter, I assume, since she wasn't a store employee) who was managing the animals. I believe she had puppies, because I remember telling her that I didn't have adequate yard for a dog (I was living in a condo at the time that didn't have a back yard), and so I wasn't going to get a puupy, but I just wanted to hold one because they were soooo cute. She wouldn't let me -- she glared at me and said that I couldn't have one of the dogs because of my yard situation. Like I was a 5-year-old child who didn't have enough sense of my own to make the right decision. Needless to say I was very upset, but I think I waited until I got to my car before I started crying! :o

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