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December 2010: What are you reading?

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SonjaMarie
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Post by SonjaMarie » Tue December 28th, 2010, 7:46 pm

I've finished "Aristocrats: Power, Grace, and Decadence: Britain's Great Ruling Classes From 1066 to the Present" by Lawrence James (403pgs, 2009)*. An interesting look at the lives of the aristocrats. Some chapters were more interesting then others though.

SM
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Elysium
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Post by Elysium » Tue December 28th, 2010, 9:26 pm

Reading Hand of Isis by Jo Graham. I'ts about Cleopatra but told from Charmian's point of view. She was the other servant who died with Cleopatra. I've liked it so far.

annis
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Post by annis » Tue December 28th, 2010, 10:29 pm

Just finished Elisabeth Storrs' novel, The Wedding Shroud, which is set in the fifth century BC. It's the story of a young Roman woman who is used as a pawn by marriage in the ongoing conflict between two cities - aggressively expansive Rome (the lean and hungry wolves) and the prosperous, sophisticated Etruscan city of Veii. Very absorbing look at a pivotal point in history from the POV of a woman who struggles to reconcile her stern duty to Rome with the seductions of life as the wife of an Etruscan nobleman. Slow, sinuous and almost hypnotic, it's probably not going to appeal to someone wanting a blood-and-guts historical adventure, but it's a fascinating read.

Ariadne has done an excellent review at her Reading the Past blog:

Next up, The Dressmaker by Posie Graeme-Evans.

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Kasthu
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Post by Kasthu » Wed December 29th, 2010, 1:23 am

I'm maybe the last person to read this, but I'm now reading The Little Stranger, by Sarah Waters--an impulse purchase at a Borders kiosk in the Philadelphia airport, but I'm liking it 40 pages in...

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Brenna
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Post by Brenna » Wed December 29th, 2010, 1:26 am

In two days, I read and finished The Many Lives and Secret Sorrows of Josephine B by Sandra Gulland. I just have to order the other two even though my mom asked me to wait until my birthday in a month. I just don't think I can!
Brenna

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Ariadne
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Post by Ariadne » Wed December 29th, 2010, 2:20 am

[quote=""annis""]Just finished Elisabeth Storrs' novel, The Wedding Shroud, which is set in the fifth century BC. It's the story of a young Roman woman who is used as a pawn by marriage in the ongoing conflict between two cities - aggressively expansive Rome (the lean and hungry wolves) and the prosperous, sophisticated Etruscan city of Veii. Very absorbing look at a pivotal point in history from the POV of a woman who struggles to reconcile her stern duty to Rome with the seductions of life as the wife of an Etruscan nobleman. Slow, sinuous and almost hypnotic, it's probably not going to appeal to someone wanting a blood-and-guts historical adventure, but it's a fascinating read.[/quote]

I'm happy to hear you also enjoyed the book, Annis (and thanks for linking to my review!). Yours is an excellent short writeup. I found it fascinating to see the differences between the Romans and Etruscans in those early days, considering how Roman customs would develop later on.

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Ariadne
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Post by Ariadne » Wed December 29th, 2010, 2:21 am

[quote=""Kasthu""]I'm maybe the last person to read this, but I'm now reading The Little Stranger, by Sarah Waters--an impulse purchase at a Borders kiosk in the Philadelphia airport, but I'm liking it 40 pages in...[/quote]

I loved that book. Seriously creepy. I made the mistake of reading it in bed, and it had me glancing around the room nervously before I turned the light out.

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Nefret
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Post by Nefret » Wed December 29th, 2010, 3:45 am

[quote=""Kasthu""]I'm maybe the last person to read this, but I'm now reading The Little Stranger, by Sarah Waters--an impulse purchase at a Borders kiosk in the Philadelphia airport, but I'm liking it 40 pages in...[/quote]

I rather liked that one. Let me know what you think when you finish. ;)
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

SCW
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Post by SCW » Wed December 29th, 2010, 6:54 am

Five Quarters of the Orange by Joanne Harris of which I've read a third of the way in. When I finish that, then I'll start on Wolf Hall

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Wed December 29th, 2010, 11:51 am

[quote=""Ariadne""]I loved that book. Seriously creepy. I made the mistake of reading it in bed, and it had me glancing around the room nervously before I turned the light out.[/quote]

Yup, it's very spooky - I read it in bed too, and often found myself looking over my shoulder! I enjoyed it though.
Currently reading: "Fear on the Phantom Special" by Edward Marston.

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