Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

November 2010: What Are You Reading?

Retired Threads
Locked
User avatar
Kasthu
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 699
Joined: December 2008
Location: Radnor, PA
Contact:

Post by Kasthu » Tue November 16th, 2010, 12:14 am

Now reading a book I've been anxious to get to: The Distant Hours, by Kate Morton.

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4241
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Tue November 16th, 2010, 8:17 am

Don't forget to let us know what you think of it!! It's a recent addition to my TBR pile.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Brenna
Bibliophile
Posts: 1358
Joined: June 2010
Location: Delaware

Post by Brenna » Tue November 16th, 2010, 2:05 pm

Picked up The House at Riverton by Kate Morton from the library.
Brenna

User avatar
cw gortner
Bibliophile
Posts: 1288
Joined: September 2008
Location: San Francisco,CA
Contact:

Post by cw gortner » Tue November 16th, 2010, 5:08 pm

It must be a trend :) I've heard so much about her books, I picked up House of Riverton yesterday. If I like it, I'll probably get Distant Hours.

In the middle of Heresy; it's picked up steam and I'm enjoying it, though I'm not quite sure yet why Giordano Bruno is the lead. It seems as though the author could have used any well-educated Catholic with a charge of heresy against them, even perhaps made the lead a fictional one; Bruno's astonishing historical persona so far has almost no bearing on the story itself. Nevertheless, it's an engrossing read, in the mold of C.J. Sansom's work.
THE QUEEN'S VOW available on June 12, 2012!
THE TUDOR SECRET, Book I in the Elizabeth I Spymaster Chronicles
THE CONFESSIONS OF CATHERINE DE MEDICI
THE LAST QUEEN


www.cwgortner.com

User avatar
EC2
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3661
Joined: August 2008
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Post by EC2 » Tue November 16th, 2010, 5:40 pm

I tried The House At Riverton but was so-so. It wasn't the best thing since sliced bread but it wasn't totally dire either, just average and better at the beginning than it was at the end. I probably won't read another as I have so much else on the TBR.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

User avatar
Tanzanite
Bibliophile
Posts: 1963
Joined: August 2008
Location: Northern Virginia
Contact:

Post by Tanzanite » Tue November 16th, 2010, 6:03 pm

Finished Helen Hollick's The Kingmaking (loved it) and will be starting The Lady's Slipper by Deborah Swift later today. It's a bit of a departure from the time periods I normally read about so I know virtually nothing about the historical facts.

User avatar
Brenna
Bibliophile
Posts: 1358
Joined: June 2010
Location: Delaware

Post by Brenna » Wed November 17th, 2010, 12:06 am

[QUOTE=cw gortner;73912]It must be a trend :) I've heard so much about her books, I picked up House of Riverton yesterday. If I like it, I'll probably get Distant Hours.

C.W I have just started Part II of the book and I am enjoying it! The way she writes makes me want more!
Brenna

User avatar
Amanda
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 910
Joined: August 2008
Location: Sydney, Australia

Post by Amanda » Wed November 17th, 2010, 1:22 am

[quote=""Amanda""]I'm reading Clean: The Unsanitised History of Washing by Katherine Ashenburg[/quote]

Felt I had to share this quote from the book, a small factoid in the margin:

"Shortly before Louis XIV died in 1715, a new ordinance decreed that faeces left in the corridors of Versailles would be removed once a week."
:eek:


I remembered reading in Farewell My Queen, that Versailles was a thoroughly stinky place and infested with rats, but this is a new level of understanding just how stinky!

User avatar
Margaret
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2440
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: I can't answer this in 100 characters. Sorry.
Favourite HF book: Checkmate, the final novel in the Lymond series
Preferred HF: Literary novels. Late medieval and Renaissance.
Location: Catskill, New York, USA
Contact:

Post by Margaret » Wed November 17th, 2010, 4:07 am

"Shortly before Louis XIV died in 1715, a new ordinance decreed that faeces left in the corridors of Versailles would be removed once a week."
Once a day would be excessively persnickety, I guess. (I was going to use another word than "persnickety" but thought the pun might be going too far.)
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings (probably well over 5000 by now, but I haven't re-counted lately) and over 700 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

User avatar
Madeleine
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 5724
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: Now you see them by Elly Griffiths
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Post by Madeleine » Wed November 17th, 2010, 8:42 pm

Just as well they clean up a bit more often nowadays, especially with the number of visitors there!

I whizzed through "Club Dead", and am now reading "Dead to the World".
Currently reading: Now you see them by Elly Griffiths

Locked

Return to “Archives”