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"Historical" Movies

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donroc
Compulsive Reader
Location: Winter Haven, Florida
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Postby donroc » Sat November 8th, 2008, 4:47 pm

Irene Dunne sang a very good song. Watch her in Showboat and Roberta. Wonderful screwball comedienne as well.
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Bodo the Apostate, a novel set during the reign of Louis the Pious and end of the Carolingian Empire.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXZthhY6OtI&feature=channel_page

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Christina
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Location: Yorkshire, England
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Postby Christina » Mon November 10th, 2008, 12:40 am

I utterly withdraw my "Lion in Winter" comments then :-) , and yes about Irene Dunne being magnificent in "Mudlark" :-) . I believe she played a totally different role from her usual perfomances...and an amazing role it was!

I also loved Alan Rickman's portrayal as the eponymous hero of "Rasputin" but was not so happy with Ian McKeown (sp) as Nicholas II...Anyone see and love that film?

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Emily
Scribbler
Location: Brazil

Postby Emily » Mon November 10th, 2008, 4:05 am

hahaha, I'll back up your LIW comments, Christina ;) I rented it after reading "Devil's Brood" and only got about 1/2 way through it before calling it quits. My opinion probably isn't worth much though considering I'm fairly young and when I first saw Eleanor thought, "That doesn't look like Audrey Hepburn." Did I really just admit to that?

I went through a Braveheart phase, but after I watched a history channel program on "the real William Wallace" it hasn't been the same for me. The scenery is breathtaking though.

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michellemoran
Bibliophile
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Postby michellemoran » Mon November 10th, 2008, 4:50 am

I can't stand Gwynneth Paltrow, especially in that version of Emma. Give me Kate Beckinsale's Emma any day.


Oh, I've never seen the Kate Beckinsale version! I'll have to put it on my to-rent list.

I adore historical films, even the ones that are just average and not historically accurate. Here's a list of the one's I've seen (some are foreign), and I've starred/bolded the ones I can highly recommend.

The Lives of Others*
Malena*
La Vie En Rose*
Goodbye, Lenin*
Shakespeare in Love*
Gone With the Wind*
Amadeus*
The Color Purple*
Braveheart*
Elizabeth: The Golden Age*
Last of the Mohicans*
Gladiator*
The Count of Monte Cristo*
HBO's Rome Series*
HBO's Adams Series*
The Red Violin*

Evita
The Importance of Being Earnest
Persuasion
Northanger Abbey
Pride and Prejudice
Mansfield Park
The Other Boleyn Girl
The Incredible Journey of Mary Bryant
Emma
Alfred the Great
Horatio Hornblower
Raise the Red Lantern
Memoirs of a Geisha
Chocolat
Queen Margot
Henry V
Farewell My Concubine
Moliere
Vanity Fair (I'd give this one a skip)
The Cuckoo (I'd probably skip this one too)
Russian Ark (if you enjoy torturing yourself, rent this... if you're a true masochist, watch until the end)
A Knight's Tale
Joan
La Dolce Vita
Sense and Sensibility
The Scarlett Empress
English Patient
All Creatures Great and Small
Duchess
Gangs of New York
Far and Away
Nicholas Nickleby
Immortal Beloved
Copying Beethoven
Sleepy Hollow
Scarlett
The Man in the Iron Mask
King Arthur
Beowulf
300
Chicago
A Tale of Two Cities
Oliver
Last edited by michellemoran on Fri November 14th, 2008, 5:25 am, edited 6 times in total.
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Margaret
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Interest in HF: I can't answer this in 100 characters. Sorry.
Favorite HF book: Checkmate, the final novel in the Lymond series
Preferred HF: Literary novels. Late medieval and Renaissance.
Location: Catskill, New York, USA
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Postby Margaret » Mon November 10th, 2008, 5:31 am

Last of the Mohicans is one of the movies my husband loves to watch over and over. I enjoyed it, too, and did watch more than once. Mark Twain gave the James Fenimore Cooper novel a scathing review. I did take the novel down from a library shelf after seeing the movie, but after dipping into the opening pages, I decided I was unlikely to disagree with Twain. It's interesting how much a director can do to improve a novel when filming it. Has anyone read Cooper's novel, and if so, do you know how closely the film follows the story?
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michellemoran
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Postby michellemoran » Mon November 10th, 2008, 5:44 am

I can watch that movie over and over again, too! I have to admit, I've never read the book. It was something we were supposed to read for EC in junior high, but I never got around to it. I have read Twain's review - and yikes!
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MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favorite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Postby MLE (Emily Cotton) » Mon November 10th, 2008, 6:21 am

"Margaret" wrote:Last of the Mohicans is one of the movies my husband loves to watch over and over. I enjoyed it, too, and did watch more than once. Mark Twain gave the James Fenimore Cooper novel a scathing review. I did take the novel down from a library shelf after seeing the movie, but after dipping into the opening pages, I decided I was unlikely to disagree with Twain. It's interesting how much a director can do to improve a novel when filming it. Has anyone read Cooper's novel, and if so, do you know how closely the film follows the story?


The film doesn't follow the story at all. As I recall, Hawkeye and the older chief were contemporaries, and the lovers were actually Uncas and Cora. Switching the romantic lead is a rather major change, don't you think?
As for the rest, it was a lot of very slow, overly descriptive eighteenth-century prose. I can hardly remember any of it.

Michelle, I watched a movie called the weeping camel, but it wasn't HF, it was set in modern-day Mongolia. As a breeder of camelids (llamas are little camels) I got a hoot out of their attempts to make it look like the baby camel wasn't nursing. That camel calf was a perfectly ordinary calf with no nursing problems whatever, and was plainly wondering what the filmmakers were trying to do. It showed a nice clip of the culture, but the plot was blown to bits for anybody who knew animals.
Was this the same film you are referring to, or is it another by the same name?
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michellemoran
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Postby michellemoran » Mon November 10th, 2008, 5:33 pm

MLE: You're right! I cut and pasted my list of movies from my blog, and shouldn't have included TWC . Such a cute movie - although yes, I suspect not very accurate. My husband and I are planning a trip to see a former student in Mongolia, and I'm eager to see how the movie compares to the reality. Doubtful... I suppose... especially the weeping camel part ;)
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MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favorite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Postby MLE (Emily Cotton) » Mon November 10th, 2008, 6:43 pm

Actually, the movie was given to us by our friends who lived in Erdenet, Mongolia, for three years. They said that it was pretty representative of rural Mongolian life. Not so much in the 'big' cities, like Ulan Bator, but very much what Mongolians consider the 'real' Mongolia.

I'd love to go there myself, and envy you the chance! Try the national drink, fermented mare's milk, for me.
my facebook posts https://www.facebook.com/emilylaurencotton are public, generally things I find amusing.
my passions: fair trade, ending slavery, and justice.
"Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects." Will Rogers
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michellemoran
Bibliophile
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Postby michellemoran » Mon November 10th, 2008, 7:37 pm

Try the national drink, fermented mare's milk, for me.


Oh gosh, really?!!! I may have to become a vegan...

This is probably an ignorant question, but do llamas produce milk that's considered drinkable?
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