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The Wars of the Roses

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robinbird79
Avid Reader
Location: Georgia

Postby robinbird79 » Sun June 28th, 2009, 12:26 am

I have the first of the Posie G-E trilogy but haven't started on it yet...have others I want to read first.

juditharnopp
Scribbler
Location: west wales
Contact:

richard iii

Postby juditharnopp » Thu January 28th, 2010, 4:27 pm

my second favourite book set in the Wars of the Roses (the first is the sunne in splendour) is Reay Tannahill's The Seventh Son. I found the character of Richard the third very solid and the whole story convincing. when i was at school i liked the very saintly portrayal of Richard in Loyalte me lie (author escapes me at the moment, was it somebody Edwards?). i read anything on the wars of the roses, just love it!


currently reading Flambard's Confession by Mariyan Durham

http://www.juditharnopp.com

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ejays17
Reader
Location: Australia
Contact:

Postby ejays17 » Thu February 18th, 2010, 12:25 pm

Have read SKP's The Sunne in Splendour and Jean Plady's The Reluctant Queen in quick succession, and was interested to compare/contrast the 2 novels (hearking back to school essays... :rolleyes :)

Of the 2, I preferred Sunne, of course it's a longer book, and can cover much more, but I thought that it was more - emotional isn't quite right, but I can't thik of a better term at the moment. With Queen, as it was written 1st-person POV, therre was lots of "and then Richard told me / I found out later", which pulled me out of the story. And I thought that Anne got very whiny & self-pitying at the end of the book as well, which annoyed me.
And in both books Edward was hero-worshipped to an amazing degree by Richard, but in the Plaidy he seemed to also acknowledge that Edward had many, many faults, whereas I didn't really take that from the Penman.
One of the bits of Queen that i did like was the friendship (of sorts) that happened between Anne & Margaret of Anjou - i thought that it humanised Margaret a bit. And that she loved her son because he was her son, not just that he should be King.

I would be more likely to re-read Sunne even if it's 4 times the lenght, it was a more satisfying read.
I've got The White Queen on the TBR pile, so another version of events to contrast... :)
"Logic, my dear Zoe, merely enables one to be wrong with authority." The Doctor, Wheel in Space

SLOC: Solid Lump of Comfort (from the Chalet School books by Elinor M Brent-Dyer)

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Thu February 25th, 2010, 8:16 pm

:eek: :eek: :eek:Credit for this goes to Karla over at GR and PBS. I think I may have to mooch this one,

Image

Caught between supporters of the Lancasters and the Yorks, David DAubere, Earl of Lynchburg, swears fealty to Henry VI. His loyalty to the throne is rewarded by marriage to the Earl of Cornwichs daughter and possession of all her landsmore than David could have hoped for.

Lady Riley Snowden, a Yorkist spy, is working at Cornwich castle, waiting for the opportunity to slay the master. When she tries to kill David she is caught and then sent to the dungeons. But when he meets his fragile and mentally challenged wife, David realizes Riley must bear the Cornwich heir.

The natural-born conflict between these two very strong characters boils over in hatred, mistrust and searing passion. There is no denying the fact that they are perfect in bed, but Riley has a mission to accomplish and David is torn between his loyalty to the Lancaster cause and his growing belief that the Yorkists are right about Queen Margarets dangerous plans for England.


BB, you want to go next?

PS, looked at the Amazon reviews and Klausner loved it.
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

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Tanzanite
Bibliophile
Location: Northern Virginia
Contact:

Postby Tanzanite » Fri February 26th, 2010, 1:01 am

Oh dear - He looks like Lorenzo Lamas with bad hair extensions!

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Fri February 26th, 2010, 1:33 am

"Tanzanite" wrote:Oh dear - He looks like Lorenzo Lamas with bad hair extensions!


:eek: :eek:

Good point. This is definitely one for your covers blog. I just read this, especially as Harriet raved about it :D
At home with a good book and the cat...

...is the only place I want to be

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boswellbaxter
Bibliomaniac
Location: North Carolina
Contact:

Postby boswellbaxter » Fri February 26th, 2010, 1:36 am

"Misfit" wrote: :eek: :eek: :eek: Credit for this goes to Karla over at GR and PBS. I think I may have to mooch this one,


BB, you want to go next?

PS, looked at the Amazon reviews and Klausner loved it.


I don't know if my poor heart can take it. And I hope someone gives a shirt to this man by the time he gets to Towton.

Unfortunately, when I hear "Earl of Lynchburg" I think of Jerry Falwell.
Susan Higginbotham
Coming in October: The Woodvilles


http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/
http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Fri February 26th, 2010, 3:04 am

Heh, I could have sworn Klausner's reviews were more coherent back in the early days but no......

In 1460, the Earl of Cornwich learns his son died on the battlefield. Stunned by his loss, his Queen informs him that his daughter will marry the landless but loyal Earl David D'Aubere. Like all the lesser lords, David is caught between sides during the War of the Roses. However, his loyalty has paid off as he gains the hand of Lady Jeanette, Cornwich's daughter and an estate.
However, instead of a hero's welcome at Cornwich Castle, he finds a York supporter, Lady Riley Snowden poised to kill him, but he makes her his prisoner. When he meets his wife by proxy David finds the teenager to have the mind of an infant and a young girl's body. Her father insists David insure she become pregnant so that Cornwich blood flows in future generations as no other child exists. David offers Riley her freedom if she willingly gives birth to his child and leaves it with him. Neither one realized that initial attraction will flame into love.

HEART OF A WARRIOR is an exciting historical romance that centers on star-crossed lovers caught between the Lancaster-York war and dangerous conspiracies to control the throne. The story line blends history inside a powerful period piece filled with action and romance. David is a wonderful character who early on in the plot obtains his life goal only to learn the cost. Riley is heroic as she adheres to her beliefs even when love enters her heart. Betty Davidson provides sub-genre fans with a powerful romantic look at a pivotal moment in Anglo history.


Harriet Klausner


Another review talks about the author's imagery of 13C England. :confused: :confused:

Another says the sex is so hot the pages will scorch you (Shelf of Shame here I come :D )
At home with a good book and the cat...

...is the only place I want to be

User avatar
Rowan
Bibliophile
Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
Contact:

Postby Rowan » Tue June 29th, 2010, 5:26 pm

Okay guys... put on your face masks while I dust this thread off a bit.

*coughs violently* :o

After many unsuccessful trips to bookstores, I finally managed to snag one of Susan's books. Yes, I know I could've ordered the doggone thing, but sometimes I'm too lazy to do that. I admit it. :p Fathers Day weekend I was house sitting for my cousin and my friend and I hit the Barnes & Noble after seeing a movie. There, I found The Stolen Crown and bought it.

I'm finally about to read it, but I realise I really have little knowledge beyond the basics of the Wars of the Roses. I've scanned this thread and picked up some good titles to read in addition to Susan's book, but they don't go back far enough for me. I know the Wars didn't start until Henry VI was in power, but I would like to read about Edward III as well since the origins seem to begin with him.

Can anyone recommend any good reading about Edward III?

(You can remove your face masks now. I think the dust has settled. :D )

User avatar
boswellbaxter
Bibliomaniac
Location: North Carolina
Contact:

Postby boswellbaxter » Tue June 29th, 2010, 5:37 pm

"Rowan" wrote:Okay guys... put on your face masks while I dust this thread off a bit.

*coughs violently* :o

After many unsuccessful trips to bookstores, I finally managed to snag one of Susan's books. Yes, I know I could've ordered the doggone thing, but sometimes I'm too lazy to do that. I admit it. :p Fathers Day weekend I was house sitting for my cousin and my friend and I hit the Barnes & Noble after seeing a movie. There, I found The Stolen Crown and bought it.

I'm finally about to read it, but I realise I really have little knowledge beyond the basics of the Wars of the Roses. I've scanned this thread and picked up some good titles to read in addition to Susan's book, but they don't go back far enough for me. I know the Wars didn't start until Henry VI was in power, but I would like to read about Edward III as well since the origins seem to begin with him.

Can anyone recommend any good reading about Edward III?

(You can remove your face masks now. I think the dust has settled. :D )


Thanks for buying! Ian Mortimer's The Perfect King is good, as is W. M. Ormrod, The Reign of Edward III (though it's quite dry).
Susan Higginbotham

Coming in October: The Woodvilles





http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/

http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/


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