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Bleeding the well dry, Robin hood and king Arthur

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Michy
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Post by Michy » Tue October 5th, 2010, 7:35 pm

I imagine one big reason why so much is written over and over about Eleanor and Elizabeth I is because when it comes to historical females in positions of power, there aren't many to choose from. Myself, I prefer to read historical books that feature non-royals, but I know not everyone feels that way. In fact, I may be in the minority.... :)

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Miss Moppet
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Post by Miss Moppet » Tue October 5th, 2010, 8:46 pm

[quote=""EC2""]I think Eleanor is still interesting because no-one has properly told her story yet and got at who she really was. SKP perhaps, but only as part of a much broader canvas. Otherwise, even in the supposedly factual arena, there is mucho dross! IMO natch.[/quote]

I just finished Time and Chance and while I loved Sharon's Eleanor and thought her story was very well told, I'd like to read a different version - not something off the wall like The Secret Eleanor, but a new interpretation of the known facts. I'm not convinced, for example, that Henry and Eleanor were as passionate as they're usually portrayed, even in the beginning. I wonder if people assume they were because they had so many children - but queens were brood mares, so it doesn't necessarily follow. I'd also like to read a book dealing with Eleanor's girlhood and marriage to Louis - everything I've read so far has started with her divorce.

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Tue October 5th, 2010, 9:09 pm

[quote=""Miss Moppet""]I just finished Time and Chance and while I loved Sharon's Eleanor and thought her story was very well told, I'd like to read a different version - not something off the wall like The Secret Eleanor, but a new interpretation of the known facts. I'm not convinced, for example, that Henry and Eleanor were as passionate as they're usually portrayed, even in the beginning. I wonder if people assume they were because they had so many children - but queens were brood mares, so it doesn't necessarily follow. I'd also like to read a book dealing with Eleanor's girlhood and marriage to Louis - everything I've read so far has started with her divorce.[/quote]

Sigh...

I'm afraid we might have to wait for EC for that. Although you never know what the research might turn up :rolleyes:
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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Tue October 5th, 2010, 9:18 pm

[quote=""Miss Moppet""]I just finished Time and Chance and while I loved Sharon's Eleanor and thought her story was very well told, I'd like to read a different version - not something off the wall like The Secret Eleanor, but a new interpretation of the known facts. I'm not convinced, for example, that Henry and Eleanor were as passionate as they're usually portrayed, even in the beginning. I wonder if people assume they were because they had so many children - but queens were brood mares, so it doesn't necessarily follow. I'd also like to read a book dealing with Eleanor's girlhood and marriage to Louis - everything I've read so far has started with her divorce.[/quote]

Which is exactly what I believe about their marriage having started the Akashic research and I also intend to start from the beginning, not from the divorce.

Realise I am going off at a tangent, so to bring it back. I think with well known characters, there is still room for re-interpretation and it comes back to general fascination with those characters and public awareness. They are always going to be popular and they will sell. But I also think there is room for lesser known ones. It's just a case of finding the angle and writing something that is going to sell in the market and fire up reader imagination. I would love to see a novel of the Song of Roland. :)
Les proz e les vassals
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'The Brave and the valiant
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For never will cowards fall down there.'

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Miss Moppet
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Post by Miss Moppet » Tue October 5th, 2010, 10:43 pm

[quote=""EC2""]Which is exactly what I believe about their marriage having started the Akashic research and I also intend to start from the beginning, not from the divorce.[/quote]

:) :) :) It will be fascinating to see what the Akashics throw up. I really think it is the only way to get a new view of Eleanor without going right off the rails.[/QUOTE]

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Michy
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Post by Michy » Wed October 6th, 2010, 12:36 am

[quote=""Miss Moppet""]I'm not convinced, for example, that Henry and Eleanor were as passionate as they're usually portrayed, even in the beginning. I wonder if people assume they were because they had so many children - but queens were brood mares, so it doesn't necessarily follow.[/quote]

I've always suspected they married more for political reasons than for anything else. After all, they were both ambitious and politically savvy people who could see the advantages in a marriage to one another. I think maybe their union is viewed as passionate not only because of all the kids, but because of the older woman-younger man aspect. As for all the kids -- well, I'd say that's not so much an indication of passion as it is an indication of less-than-effective birth control! :D And also the queen-as-brood-mare angle, as you say.

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Michy
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Post by Michy » Thu October 7th, 2010, 5:46 am

This is in a slightly different vein, but along the same lines. That is, not people who are "over-exposed" in HF, but perhaps places.

When I think back over the HF books I've read since I started reading HF in my teens, the vast majority have been set in England -- no surprise. Of those, the far, far majority have either been set in London (again, no surprise) or Cornwall. Why Cornwall?

This could just be a reflection of a lack of diversity in my reading material. Then again, perhaps it is something that others have noticed? If so, what is the attraction of Cornwall over other parts of England as a setting for HF?

M.M. Bennetts

Post by M.M. Bennetts » Thu October 7th, 2010, 7:24 am

That's funny about Cornwall. You're right.

My family comes from there. And everyone down there is a cousin. Everyone. So here in the UK there are lots of jokes about the gene-pool of four.

I wonder how much of it has to do with Daphne du Maurier's Vanishing Cornwall? (She was a neighbour of the grandparents...) It's seen as this romantic, rugged, remote place...sea on all sides, cliffs, barren stretches of moorland. Lots of wind. Island fortresses like St. Michael's Mount. Funny names that sound all 'romanticky'.

And it did, because of the distance from London remain far less 'civilised' than the nearer counties. Same with Yorkshire or Northumberland in its way.

I've never even considered setting a novel down there though. It would be like talking about my back garden--I'd probably just complain about all the weeds and how I hadn't mucked in the roses yet for autumn. Boring, boring, boring.

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Thu October 7th, 2010, 9:37 am

[quote=""Michy""]This is in a slightly different vein, but along the same lines. That is, not people who are "over-exposed" in HF, but perhaps places.

When I think back over the HF books I've read since I started reading HF in my teens, the vast majority have been set in England -- no surprise. Of those, the far, far majority have either been set in London (again, no surprise) or Cornwall. Why Cornwall?

This could just be a reflection of a lack of diversity in my reading material. Then again, perhaps it is something that others have noticed? If so, what is the attraction of Cornwall over other parts of England as a setting for HF?[/quote]

I suppose it has entered the national psyche as a place that's slightly mysterious, beautiful, rugged, out on the edge (still had its own separate language until fairly recently) and terribly romantic - and those elements have then been exported in the same manner that all things Scottish have been. (Stateside you gets kilts and heather and 'Och wee lassie' rather than deep fried Mars Bars and Rab. C. Nesbitt. Cornwall is a major holiday destination for the rest of the UK and as with all touristy places, the area tends to loom larger in terms of visibility. People tend to think in epic, romantic terms of Cornwall. You wouldn't set a detective series there unless it was Midsomer Murders, but it's perfect for period dramas and historical tales from all eras. Of course this doesn't reflect the diverse reality, but my opening comments reflect what the rest of the nation has distilled about Cornwall, regardless of what the Cornish themselves think!
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Thu October 7th, 2010, 10:41 am

Cornwall's certainly very evocative, it also does retain, despite all the touristy bits, it's own character and identity, in fact there was a campaign to have it re-named Kernow (the old Celtic name) and to have the Cornish language kept as an official language - I haven't been down there for a few years so not sure what progress they've made! Plus, stuck on its own "leg" at the bottom of the UK, it does have a feel of being slightly separate from the rest of the country. Add the facts that it's surrounded on 3 sides by water, with its' dramatic coastline, all those caves and inlets, its' smuggling history, the moorland and yes, the du Maurier and Poldark effect, and possibly the fact that it's the end of England - next stop the US - I think there are endless possibilities there!

Do you still live there, or have you ever lived there, MMB?
Currently reading: Now you see them by Elly Griffiths

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