Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Disappointed by a book from a favourite author?

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.
annis
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4585
Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Sat October 2nd, 2010, 7:05 pm

Posted by MM Bennetts
Also, and this is not historical fiction, I've always been a huge fan of Dick Francis, but the book where he brought Sid Halley back--it was his third outing--that read like flat champagne. It had once had sparkle but now, nothing.
The Dick Francis/Felix Francis books aren't a patch on the original DF novels, and the latest couple have been real dogs.

laktor
Reader
Posts: 108
Joined: September 2010

Post by laktor » Sat October 2nd, 2010, 9:17 pm

[quote=""Michy""]I loved Rutherfurd's Sarum and London (I liked-but-not-loved Russka and The New Forest, and didn't read his books on Ireland). I was so looking forward to New York, since I would love to read a really good history of the city and who to do it better than Rutherfurd, right? I was soooo disappointed; the book was a total dud. Maybe the problem was that I listened to an audio version that was condensed (so all the good parts were cut out?). Has anyone read a printed version? Is it any good?[/quote]

I just finished reading New York barely 2 weeks ago and enjoyed it. In your terms, I liked it but didn't love it. Still, I found it well worth my time. It must have just come out in paperback as I saw it in the bookstore today. I've never "listened" to a book before and I really don't care to. But if I did, it would have to be the complete edition, not abridged. Russka, I got about 3/4 through and quit. Just couldn't bother with finishing it. As for his Ireland books, I read the first one and enjoyed it, although the story got a bit bogged down and I got a bit confused with the characters toward the end. Haven't read the second one yet. On another note, Edward Rutherfurd came to Toronto last fall for a book signing but I didn't go. I have seen John Jakes and Ken Follett in person and had my books signed.

User avatar
rockygirl
Avid Reader
Posts: 349
Joined: August 2010
Location: Upstate New York

Post by rockygirl » Sun October 3rd, 2010, 12:13 am

The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver. No matter how I try, I can't get past chapter 5.

User avatar
Gabriella
Scribbler
Posts: 20
Joined: September 2010
Location: Antarctica

Post by Gabriella » Sun October 3rd, 2010, 1:20 am

I loved Philippa Greogy's 'The Other Boleyn Girl', the 'Wideacre' trilogy, and most all the other books she has written that I have read. But when I read 'The White Queen' I was sorely disappointed.

laktor
Reader
Posts: 108
Joined: September 2010

Post by laktor » Sun October 3rd, 2010, 6:28 am

[quote=""Gabriella""]I loved Philippa Greogy's 'The Other Boleyn Girl', the 'Wideacre' trilogy, and most all the other books she has written that I have read. But when I read 'The White Queen' I was sorely disappointed.[/quote]

I bought "The Other Boleyn Girl", the first novel of hers I tried reading, but quit after about 1/4 of the way into it. I found it dull.

User avatar
Kveto from Prague
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 919
Joined: September 2008
Location: Prague, Bohemia

Post by Kveto from Prague » Sun October 3rd, 2010, 6:39 am

ive only read two books from him so i dont know if he can qualify as a favourite, but Graham Shelby's "knights of dark reknown" was a face paced tale set in the end of the crusader state. his "villains of the piece", set in steven and matyldas civil war, was dishwater dull.

User avatar
rockygirl
Avid Reader
Posts: 349
Joined: August 2010
Location: Upstate New York

Post by rockygirl » Sun October 3rd, 2010, 12:12 pm

[quote=""laktor""]I bought "The Other Boleyn Girl", the first novel of hers I tried reading, but quit after about 1/4 of the way into it. I found it dull.[/quote]

I thought I was the only one here who didn't like it.

Actually, I'm not too keen on PG.

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2475
Joined: August 2008
Location: Arizona, USA

Post by Ash » Sun October 3rd, 2010, 3:08 pm

Youre so not alone; I read OBG and I didn't care at all for the characterization of Anne. Because my sis loved her work so much, I tried to read Queen's Fool and Virgin Lover and found so many off the wall interpretations of characters, as well as glaring inaccuracies that I was turned off from her books totally. That being said I am curious to revisit her view of Mary Boleyn after rereading Wolf Hall. I really liked Mantel's take on her, and am trying to remember what Gregory did with her.

Not HF, but I have been rather disappointed by the last couple of Pratchett books. I do wonder if his illness is getting in his way. He has a new one out and I'm getting it and crossing my fingers.

Other non HF authors who have disappointed me: Amy Tan, Anne Tyler, John Irving. All three started out great, then little by little their books started sounding like retreads.

SCW
Avid Reader
Posts: 286
Joined: October 2010
Preferred HF: Lately World Two or the time immediately before and after this period
Location: Australia

Post by SCW » Sun April 1st, 2012, 5:49 am

"A Place called Freedon' and 'Jackdaws' by Ken Follett.
'The Constant Princess and The Virgins Lover (worst novel about Elizabeth the First I have ever read) by Philippa Gregory.

annis
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4585
Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Sun April 1st, 2012, 6:22 am

The book I'm just reading - Counting the Stars by Helen Dunmore. The story of Roman poet Catullus and his married lover Clodia is as limp and damp as the sheets the lovers roll about on in the sticky heat of a Roman summer. Neither character exhibits any personality trait but tedious self-indulgence and the volatile political events of the time barely get a nod.

I've enjoyed others of Dunmore's novels, but this one is distinctly "meh". An opportunity missed.
Last edited by annis on Sun April 1st, 2012, 6:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

Post Reply

Return to “General Discussion”