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Swords, Sandals, Sex and Sin

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Ludmilla
Bibliophile
Location: Georgia USA

Postby Ludmilla » Wed September 22nd, 2010, 12:56 pm

Russ,

any chance Gladiatrix will be released as an ebook in the future (perhaps when the sequel comes out)?

Russ Whitfield
Reader
Location: Richmond, Surrey
Contact:

Postby Russ Whitfield » Thu September 23rd, 2010, 9:40 am

Hi Ludmilla - there's a 100% chance. I just got a revised contract through stating that an e-book will be released. Its at home and I'm at work, so not sure when its coming out, though.

I'll check and let you know - but thanks so much for asking! :-)

Cheers

Russ

Russ Whitfield
Reader
Location: Richmond, Surrey
Contact:

Postby Russ Whitfield » Fri September 24th, 2010, 8:32 am

Oh...it doesn't say when it'll be out as an e-book. I reckon March next year then, when the sequel is (finally) out!

Cheers

Russ

User avatar
Ludmilla
Bibliophile
Location: Georgia USA

Postby Ludmilla » Fri September 24th, 2010, 12:49 pm

Thanks for the update, Russ. I've added it to the wish list.

Russ Whitfield
Reader
Location: Richmond, Surrey
Contact:

Postby Russ Whitfield » Sat September 25th, 2010, 9:21 am

And I love you for it, thanks Ludmilla

Cheers

Russ x

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Fri October 1st, 2010, 3:50 am

I think I may have found another contender for this list! I picked up a couple of old F. Van Wyck Mason historical novels at a trash ‘n’ treasure sale. One is called Lysander and is set in ancient Greece, the other, which I’m now reading, is set in Carthage around the Second Punic War period. It’s called Barbarians, and is very much in the macho ‘50s tradition of what is described as the “lusty novel of war and love”.

Cealwyn, a bold and brawny young Celt from the Cassiterides, becomes the love-slave of a nymphomanic Carthiginian noblewoman, beautiful but cruel Tiratha, but falls in love with her Roman slave-handmaiden, Valeria. With a group of other slaves looking for vengeance, he plots rebellion and escape. It’s quite good as an adventure, though very much of its time, but Carthage is extremely decadent, and Van Wyck Mason goes round the block in his attempts to describe its licentiousness without upsetting anyone, in ways which seem pretty funny now :) The hilarious “volcano” appears (spouting lava rather than honey this time) ”—when all the senses had been twisted into unendurable rapture, when the volcano spewed forth its molten fire and the thunder bellowed in Cealwyn’s ears.” Van Wyck Mason does manage to get a bit risqué at one point, (assuming the reader understands the fig reference) with this bit: “Don’t let the perfumed croup of your mistress or the spice of her wine lead you away from your purpose. The riven fig has betrayed better men than you, Barbarian.”

I’m looking forward to seeing what other inventive euphemisms Van Wyck Mason comes up with as the story progresses :D

What is it with barbarians? I notice that they feature quite a bit on these lists. Did less "civilized" equal sexier in historical fiction of a certain vintage?
Last edited by annis on Fri October 1st, 2010, 7:04 am, edited 10 times in total.

Russ Whitfield
Reader
Location: Richmond, Surrey
Contact:

Postby Russ Whitfield » Fri October 1st, 2010, 9:25 am

"annis" wrote:I think I may have found another contender for this list!


You've sold them to me, Annis!

On the barbarian thing - well, I remember reading one in the 80s called "Brack the Barbarian" (I think). He just went around drinking, shagging and fighting all the time - might as well have been wearing an England football shirt really. Maybe its cos "barbarian" has a hint of "no rules" about it and that appeals to some readers.
Last edited by Russ Whitfield on Fri October 1st, 2010, 9:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Sat October 2nd, 2010, 4:59 am

Posted by Russ Whitfield
He just went around drinking, shagging and fighting all the time - might as well have been wearing an England football shirt really


Lol! Once guys like this were the heroes of Norse sagas, now they're anti-social pests-- it all depends on cultural perceptions :)

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Sat October 2nd, 2010, 10:46 am

Terry Pratchet does a great send up on those kind of books, called The Last Hero.

http://www.amazon.com/Last-Hero-Discworld-Fable-Novels/dp/0061040967

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Sat October 2nd, 2010, 7:42 pm

I love Cohen the Barbarian and the Silver Horde! Interesting Times is one of my favourite TP novels.

Cealwyn, btw, is finding life much more peaceful since his escape from Carthage. Instead of the sexually voracious Tiratha, he now only has pirates, Roman press-gangs, the siege of Syracuse and the frustratingly virtuous Valeria to deal with--


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