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Forthcoming Books: 2012 edition

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Tanzanite
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Post by Tanzanite » Wed April 4th, 2012, 10:07 pm

Crowbone by Robert Low . UK release September 13, 2012.

The long awaited return to his Oathsworn series sees Robert Low back at his full-blooded Viking best
Crowbone, kin of Harold Fairhair of the Yngling line and true prince of Norway. Tryggve’s son and rightful inheritor of Odin’s daughter, is setting out on journey to capture what is rightfully his. In the course of Crowbone’s quest he will stand to lose everything he has ever cared for but he will gain the crown and with it he will change history.

A tale of loyalty and betrayal and of death and glory that will see Crowbone travel the globe in search for what is rightfully his is a chance once more to enter Robert Low’s unforgettable Viking world and stand side by side with this dark and driven hero as he battles for what Gunnhild, the Mother or Kings, will stop at nothing keep from him.

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Tanzanite
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Post by Tanzanite » Wed April 4th, 2012, 10:08 pm

Former People: The Final Days of the Russian Aristocracy by Douglas Smith. Non-fiction. US release October 2, 2012.


The riveting and harrowing story of the Russian nobility caught in the upheaval of the revolution
Epic in scope, precise in detail, and heart-breaking in its human drama, Former People is the first book to recount the history of the aristocracy caught up in the maelstrom of the Bolshevik Revolution and the creation of Stalin’s Russia. Filled with chilling tales of looted palaces and burning estates, of desperate flights in the night from marauding peasants and Red Army soldiers, of imprisonment, exile, and execution, it is the story of how a centuries’-old elite, famous for its glittering wealth, its service to the Tsar and Empire, and its promotion of the arts and culture, was dispossessed and destroyed along with the rest of old Russia.


Yet Former People is also a story of survival and accommodation, of how many of the tsarist ruling class—so-called “former people” and “class enemies”—overcame the psychological wounds inflicted by the loss of their world and decades of repression as they struggled to find a place for themselves and their families in the new, hostile order of the Soviet Union. Chronicling the fate of two great aristocratic families—the Sheremetevs and the Golitsyns—it reveals how even in the darkest depths of the terror, daily life went on.
Told with sensitivity and nuance by acclaimed historian Douglas Smith, Former People is the dramatic portrait of two of Russia’s most powerful aristocratic families, and a sweeping account of their homeland in violent transition.

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Tanzanite
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Post by Tanzanite » Wed April 4th, 2012, 10:10 pm

Centurion by Simon Scarrow. US release October 12, 2012 (I'm not sure if this has been released in the US before, but it was in the UK a few years ago).

Simon Scarrow's bestselling Roman Legion series chronicles the adventures of centurions Macro and Cato as they defend the far reaches of the imperium. The series has been published worldwide to near universal acclaim, with Scarrow often mentioned alongside contemporaries Bernard Cornwell and Conn Iggulden. Like Harry Sidebottom, Scarrow combines stunning historical detail with riveting battles and rich characters to bring the Roman Empire to life.

Already an international bestseller, Centurion follows Marco and Cato to the Eastern edges of the Empire. In the first century AD, Rome faces a potent new threat from its long-standing enemy—Parthia. The two rivals are vying for control of Palmyra, an officially neutral kingdom along the Euphrates river. Palmyra's royal household is on the brink of open revolt, so Rome dispatches a task force under the command of veteran warriors Macro and Cato to defend its king and guard its borders. Macro's cohort must march against the enemy, deep into treacherous territory. If Palmyra is not to fall into the clutches of Parthia, they will have to defeat superior numbers in a desperate siege. The quest for a lasting peace has never been more challenging, nor more critical for the future of the empire.
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Post by Tanzanite » Wed April 4th, 2012, 10:10 pm

The Watchers: A Secret History of the Reign of Elizabeth I by Stephen Alford. Non-fiction. US release November 13, 2012.


A thrilling history of Queen Elizabeth I’s secret service and its ruthless war against the enemies of the realm—a vivid portrait of the original "national security state."


In a Europe aflame with wars of religion and dynastic conflicts, Elizabeth I came to the throne of a realm encircled by menace. To the great Catholic powers of France and Spain, England was a heretic pariah state, a canker to be cut away for the health of the greater body of Christendom. Elizabeth’s government, defending God’s true Church of England and its leader, the queen, could stop at nothing to defend itself.


Headed by the brilliant, enigmatic, and widely feared Sir Francis Walsingham, the Elizabethan state deployed every dark art: spies, double agents, cryptography, and torture. Delving deeply into sixteenth-century archives, Stephen Alford offers a groundbreaking, chillingly vivid depiction of Elizabethan espionage, literally recovering it from the shadows. In his company we follow Her Majesty’s agents through the streets of London and Rome, and into the dank cells of the Tower. We see the world as they saw it—ever unsure who could be trusted or when the fatal knock on their own door might come. The Watchers is a riveting exploration of loyalty, faith, betrayal, and deception with the highest possible stakes, in a world poised between the Middle Ages and modernity.
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Vanessa
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Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
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Post by Vanessa » Thu April 5th, 2012, 8:03 am

It's good to know that Karen Maitland has written another book! Look forward to seeing it published.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Thu April 5th, 2012, 8:45 am

The new KM book sounds good, I don't think I've come across many books set in Iceland before, certainly sounds a bit different.
Currently reading: "The Lantern Men" by Elly Griffiths

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Post by annis » Thu April 5th, 2012, 8:06 pm

Quite coincidentally KM is treading ground already marked out by Robert Lyndon in his recent epic adventure Hawk Quest, which is rather unfortunate.

I have to say that I found KM's last novel, Gallows Curse, disappointingly flat- despite being an interesting subject it just never seemed to catch fire.

Another forthcoming novel which sounds interesting (have mentioned it elsewhere but will add here as well) - Illuminations, by Mary Sharratt (Daughters of Witching Hill). It's based on the life of medieval Benedictine abbess and mystic, Hildegard of Bingen. It's due out in October.
Last edited by annis on Sun April 15th, 2012, 8:05 am, edited 3 times in total.

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Post by annis » Sun April 15th, 2012, 8:14 am

Someone a while ago was asking about the second book in Robyn Young's Insurrection trilogy. I've just noticed from RY's website that Bk 2, titled Renegade, is due out in the UK August this year.

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Post by rebecca » Mon April 16th, 2012, 2:43 am

[quote=""annis""]Someone a while ago was asking about the second book in Robyn Young's Insurrection trilogy. I've just noticed from RY's website that Bk 2, titled Renegade, is due out in the UK August this year.[/quote]

I think that may have been me. I have Robyn's first book and could find no word on her sequels. Thanks for the info Annis...I'll bookmark it and pre-order it closer to the date of release.

Bec :)

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wendy
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Post by wendy » Thu April 19th, 2012, 1:52 pm

Is any one else as excited as I am about Toni Morrison's forthcoming book HOME (Knopf, May 8th)?

Here's the blurb:

"America’s most celebrated novelist, Nobel Prize-winner Toni Morrison extends her profound take on our history with this twentieth-century tale of redemption: a taut and tortured story about one man’s desperate search for himself in a world disfigured by war.
Frank Money is an angry, self-loathing veteran of the Korean War who, after traumatic experiences on the front lines, finds himself back in racist America with more than just physical scars. His home may seem alien to him, but he is shocked out of his crippling apathy by the need to rescue his medically abused younger sister and take her back to the small Georgia town they come from and that he’s hated all his life. As Frank revisits his memories from childhood and the war that have left him questioning his sense of self, he discovers a profound courage he had thought he could never possess again.
A deeply moving novel about an apparently defeated man finding his manhood—and his home."

I hope it's as good as PARADISE!
Wendy K. Perriman
Fire on Dark Water (Penguin, 2011)
http://www.wendyperriman.com
http://www.FireOnDarkWater.com

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