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Forthcoming Books: 2012 edition

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.
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Tanzanite
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Postby Tanzanite » Tue November 15th, 2011, 5:55 pm

The Empress by Meg Clothier. UK release July 19, 2012.

Love and treachery during the Crusaders’ siege of Constantinople in
1204

Spoilt, imperious and proud, Princess Agnes of France is only eight when she is sent to marry the emperor of Constantinople’s son. And by the time she is twelve Agnes is a widow, her husband killed by his cousin, the power hungry Andronikos. Captivated by Agnes’s beauty, Adronikos marries her. He is sixty-five.

For two years, Agnes is at the mercy of a depraved and power-crazed man. But by the time she is fourteen Andronikos too is dead, torn limb from limb by an angry mob. During her years with Andronikos, only one man, Theodore Branas, tried to help save her from the worst of his excesses.

Agnes and Theodore first met on her voyage when she was a young, spoilt princess. Now, as the politics of Constantinople ebb and flow around them, Agnes and Theodore start to make a life together. But once again, she nearly loses everything during one of the most shocking and bloody events of the thirteenth century as the Crusaders lay siege to Constantinople. Separated from Theodore, only Agnes’s French blood saves her from an horrific death. And as the city erupts in flames around her, she goes in search of Theodore, because she will not leave the city without him.

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Tanzanite
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Postby Tanzanite » Tue November 15th, 2011, 5:56 pm

The Wild Princess by Mary Hart Perry. US release July 31, 2012.

The marriage of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert produced nine children—five of them princesses, all trained for the role of marriage to future monarchs. However, the fourth princess, Louise—later the duchess of Argyll—became known by the court as “the wild one.” She fought the constraints placed on her brothers and sisters. She broke with tradition by marrying outside of the elite circle of European royals at a time when no child of the English throne had wed a commoner in 300 years. Some said she married for love. Others whispered of scandal covered up by the Crown.

In fact, many years after Louise’s death, a civil lawsuit claimed that the teenage princess secretly gave birth to a baby boy out of wedlock. One Henry Locock sought to prove through DNA evidence that his grandfather was Louise’s child, delivered by Queen Victoria’s gynecologist then secretly adopted by the doctor’s young son and his wife, thereby avoiding scandal and preserving the line of succession to the throne. But the mysteries and drama involving Louise’s life don’t stop there...This is her story.
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gyrehead
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Postby gyrehead » Wed November 16th, 2011, 5:52 pm

The Last Caesar looks interesting.

Not sure about the last entry. Well I am pretty sure just based on the promotional copy since it is so, well, sadly amusing:

She broke with tradition by marrying outside of the elite circle of European royals at a time when no child of the English throne had wed a commoner in 300 years.


Someone needs to buy or at least borrow a book on the Hanoverians if she thinks it was 300 years.

In fact, many years after Louise’s death, a civil lawsuit claimed that the teenage princess secretly gave birth to a baby boy out of wedlock. One Henry Locock sought to prove through DNA evidence that his grandfather was Louise’s child, delivered by Queen Victoria’s gynecologist then secretly adopted by the doctor’s young son and his wife, thereby avoiding scandal and preserving the line of succession to the throne.


Is it really hard to figure out British Royal succession and the fact that no child of Louise's legitimate or not would play a role in the succession? Let alone have a role in "preserving it". I'm not even sure what that means. Exactly how would this child being publicly known result in the line of succession not being preserved? Bizarre. I have to wonder what book the author read and thought "hey I can do that!"

rebecca
Compulsive Reader

Postby rebecca » Thu November 17th, 2011, 4:36 am

I think if memory serves me correctly another Princess in the Danish court had a child out of wedlock. The Princess in question was the sister to Alexandra and Dagmar, I think her name was Princess Thyra? (sp?).

I wonder if anyone will write her story? It would make for interesting reading.

Bec :)

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Tanzanite
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Postby Tanzanite » Wed November 30th, 2011, 11:41 pm

The Last Romanov by Dora Levy Mossanen. US and UK release April 12, 2012.
The love affair between Nicholas II and Alexandra, the sickly heir to the throne, the influence of the enigmatic Rasputin on Russia and its Court, the Bolshevik Uprising that changed the face of history, the ruthless execution of the royal family, and the disputed survival of the heir: it's a cinematic chaos that the masterful Dora Levy Mossanen unravels for the reader. Seen through the eyes of Darya, Imperial Russia bursts into life. When the murderous events of 1917-18 unfold, Darya is haunted by the prophecy made by the Empress's advisor, Rasputin, and the hints to her true identity. She must find the missing Tsarevich Alexis Romanov and restore the monarchy, if she is to save herself. As in her previous novels, Mossanen draws on dramatic political history, romance, folklore to create a seductive tale of intrigue, love, sex, murder, violence and retribution.
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Tanzanite
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Postby Tanzanite » Wed November 30th, 2011, 11:41 pm

The Seven Wonders by Steven Saylor. US and UK release May 22, 2012.


An enthralling prequel to Steven Saylor’s bestselling Roma Sub Rosa series of mysteries set in the Ancient World.

The year is 92 B.C. Gordianus has just turned eighteen and is about to embark on the adventure of a lifetime: a far-flung journey to see the Seven Wonders of the World. Gordianus is not yet called “the Finder”—but at each of the Seven Wonders, the wide-eyed young Roman encounters a mystery to challenge the powers of deduction.

Accompanying Gordianus on his travels is his tutor, Antipater of Sidon, the world’s most celebrated poet. But there is more to the apparently harmless old poet than meets the eye. Before they leave Rome, Antipater fakes his own death and travels under an assumed identity. Looming in the background are the first rumblings of a political upheaval that will shake the entire Roman world.

Teacher and pupil journey to the fabled cities of Greece and Asia Minor, and then to Babylon and Egypt. They attend the Olympic Games, take part in exotic festivals, and marvel at the most spectacular constructions ever devised by mankind. Along the way they encounter murder, witchcraft and ghostly hauntings. Traveling the world for the first time, Gordianus discovers that amorous exploration goes hand-in-hand with crime-solving.

The mysteries of love are the true wonders of the world, and at the end of the journey, an Eighth Wonder awaits him in Alexandria.

Her name is Bethesda.
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Postby Tanzanite » Wed November 30th, 2011, 11:42 pm

A Blaze of Glory: A Novel of the Battle of Shiloh by Jeff Shaara. US and UK release May 29, 2012.


In the first novel of a spellbinding new trilogy, New York Times bestselling author Jeff Shaara returns to the Civil War terrain he knows best. A Blaze of Glory takes us to the action-packed Western Theater for a vivid re-creation of one of the war’s bloodiest and most iconic engagements—the Battle of Shiloh.

It’s the spring of 1862. The Confederate Army in the West teeters on the brink of collapse following the catastrophic loss of Fort Donelson. Commanding general Albert Sidney Johnston is forced to pull up stakes, abandon the critical city of Nashville, and rally his troops in defense of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. Hot on Johnston’s trail are two of the Union’s best generals: the relentless Ulysses Grant, fresh off his career-making victory at Fort Donelson, and Don Carlos Buell. If their combined forces can crush Johnston’s army and capture the railroad, the war in the West likely will be over. There’s just one problem: Johnston knows of the Union plans, and is poised to launch an audacious surprise attack on Grant’s encampment—a small settlement in southwestern Tennessee anchored by a humble church named Shiloh.

With stunning you-are-there immediacy, Shaara takes us inside the maelstrom of Shiloh as no novelist has before. Drawing on meticulous research, he dramatizes the key actions and decisions of the commanders on both sides: Johnston, Grant, Sherman, Beauregard, and the illustrious Colonel Nathan Bedford Forrest. Here too are the thoughts and voices of the junior officers, conscripts, and enlisted men who gave their all for the cause: Confederate cavalry lieutenant James Seeley, Private Fritz “Dutchie” Bauer of the 16th Wisconsin Regiment—brave participants in a pitched back-and-forth battle whose casualty count would far surpass anything the American public had yet seen in this war. By the end of the second day of fighting, as Grant’s bedraggled forces regroup for what looks like a last stand, two major events—one of them totally unexpected—would turn the tide of the battle and perhaps the war itself.

A Blaze of Glory brings the exhilaration of battle to life and illuminates a pivotal clash-at-arms that changed the course of American history.

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Postby Tanzanite » Wed November 30th, 2011, 11:43 pm

Elizabeth and Essex by Lytton Strachey. Non-fiction. US and UK reissue June 19, 2012.


One of the most famous and tortured romances in history—between Elizabeth I, Queen of England, and Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex— began in 1587, when she was 53 and he was 19. Their passionate affair continued for five years, until Essex was beheaded for treason in 1601.

In a fast-paced succession of brilliantly-rendered scenes, Lytton Strachey portrays Elizabeth and Essex's compelling attraction for each other, their impassioned disagreements, and their mutual struggle for power, which culminated so tragically—for both of them. Alongside the doomed love affair, Strachey pins colorful portraits of the leading characters and influential figures of the time: Francis Bacon, Walter Raleigh, Robert Cecil, and other members of her glittering court who fought to assert themselves in a kingdom and a country defined by Elizabeth's incomparable reign.

Strachey here illuminates, in spellbinding prose, one of the most poignant affairs in history alongside the glamour and intrigue of the Elizabethan era.
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Postby Tanzanite » Wed November 30th, 2011, 11:44 pm

Queen Victoria by Lytton Strachey. Non-fiction. US and UK reissue June 19, 2012.


Awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, Strachey's classic biography remains one of the best and most readable accounts of the Queen who defined an era

Lytton Strachey's acclaimed portrayal of Queen Victoria revolutionized the art of biography by using elements of romantic fiction and melodrama to create a warm, humorous, and very human portrait of this iconic figure.

We see Victoria as a strong-willed child with a famous temper, as the 18-year-old girl queen, as a monarch, wife, mother, and widow. Equally fascinating are the depictions of her relationships: with her governess“precious Lehzen,” with Peel, Gladstone, and Disraeli, with her beloved Albert, and, in later life, her legendary devotion to her Highland servant John Brown, all of which show a different side of the staid, pious image that is so often attached to her.
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Tanzanite
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Postby Tanzanite » Wed November 30th, 2011, 11:44 pm

Legions of Rome by Stephen Dando-Collins. Non-fiction. US release July 3, 2012 (released in the UK in 2010.


The complete history of every Imperial Roman legion and what it achieved as a fighting force, by an award-winning historian

In this landmark publication, Stephen Dando-Collins does what no other author has ever attempted to do: provide a complete history of every Imperial Roman legion. Based on thirty years of meticulous research, he covers every legion of Rome in rich detail. In the first part of the book, the author provides a detailed account of what the legionaries wore and ate, what camp life was like, what they were paid, and how they were motivated and punished. Part two examines the histories of all the legions that served Rome for three hundred years starting in 30 BC . The book’s final section is a sweeping chronological survey of the campaigns in which the armies were involved, told from the point of view of the legions. Featuring more than 150 maps, photographs, diagrams and battle plans, Legions of Rome is an essential read for ancient history enthusiasts, military history experts and general readers alike.
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