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Trip to England

Been to someplace of historical interest? Planning a trip? Have a question? Post here!
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Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Silent Companions by Laura Purcell & And So It Begins by Rachel Abbott (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Postby Vanessa » Wed October 20th, 2010, 8:28 am

"Tanzanite" wrote:SGM - that's good to know about Bradford - we don't feel so bad now although it was terribly frustrating. the hotel fit into my "maximum points for maximum nights scheme" and was a decent stopping point on our way back south but I'm not sure we would ever go there again!!



A place to be avoided at all costs, in my opinion! :eek:

Glad you enjoyed your trip, though, Tanzanite.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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Madeleine
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: A Trail through Time by Jodi Taylor & Angel by L J Ross
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Postby Madeleine » Wed October 20th, 2010, 11:11 am

Most mini-roundabouts are so small that it's too tight a turn to drive round them properly, so most people do drive pretty much straight over them

I had some wires come away from my headlight a few months ago, my mechanic fixed it pretty quickly, but the same thing happened to a friend too, and I'm sure it's going over all those speed humps that's done it! And as Vanessa says, it doesn't do the car's suspension any good either.
Currently reading "A Trail through Time" by Jodi Taylor & "Angel" by L J Ross

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sweetpotatoboy
Bibliophile
Location: London, UK

Postby sweetpotatoboy » Wed October 20th, 2010, 1:37 pm

Many if not most UK city centres are an almost nightmare to drive in unless you know the routes like the back of your hand.
London obviously. But also.. Reading, Birmingham!! and most others I imagine. I steer clear of them by car if I possibly can.

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parthianbow
Compulsive Reader
Location: Nr. Bristol, SW England
Contact:

Postby parthianbow » Wed October 20th, 2010, 3:07 pm

I have to say I'm impressed by the ground you and your husband managed to cover, Tanzanite! I'm really glad that it was a good trip.

Given some of the previous posts, I also feel obliged to speak up in defence of sleeping policemen.

I say this as someone who used to speed in urban areas. Now, I live in a village without afore mentioned sleeping policemen. It is also a place where many drivers see fit to drive at speeds of up to 40+ mph. (How can I tell this? By the speed at which they pull away from me when I'm doing 30 mph.) Consequently, and as the father of 2 young children, I think that sleeping policemen are excellent. If I could, I would instal them all over our village.

A few sobering statistics:
95% of pedestrians die when hit by a car doing 40 mph.
If that vehicle is doing 35, it's still a scary 45%.
At 30 mph, it's just 15%.

*Stops writing, climbs off soapbox.*
Ben Kane
Bestselling author of Roman military fiction.
Spartacus - UK release 19 Jan. 2012. US release June 2012.

http://www.benkane.net
Twitter: @benkaneauthor

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Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Wed October 20th, 2010, 3:09 pm

Just curious by your use of "mph" -- do you use miles in Britain rather than kilometers?

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sweetpotatoboy
Bibliophile
Location: London, UK

Postby sweetpotatoboy » Wed October 20th, 2010, 3:21 pm

"Michy" wrote:Just curious by your use of "mph" -- do you use miles in Britain rather than kilometers?


Yes we do.

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Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Wed October 20th, 2010, 3:45 pm

That's interesting, especially because Canada uses kph (I tried driving up there a couple of years ago and never could get a handle on how fast I was actually going!!). Do other commonwealth (or former commonwealth) countries use miles? Or kilometers?

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favorite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Postby MLE (Emily Cotton) » Wed October 20th, 2010, 4:58 pm

We have a couple of wide streets in our town that have inadvertently become much used as by-passes for commute and high school traffic. Since they are residential neighborhood streets, the speed is supposed to be 25 mph. Of course this was frequently exceeded.

After a couple of pedestrian (child) deaths, they solved the problem with speed humps (sleeping policemen, to you brits) and solar-powered flashing signs that give your speed and tell you to slow down! in big red letters when it is more than 5 mph over the limit. It appears to have worked even on the high school drivers who are the worst offenders.

One comment on the speed humps, though-- in ours, there is a flat spot right where the driver side tires go through, which reduces the 'whump' effect by about half and makes it easier on the car. But you have to be going slowly enough to guide your tire through the exact place.

SGM
Compulsive Reader

Postby SGM » Wed October 20th, 2010, 5:23 pm

"MLE" wrote:One comment on the speed humps, though-- in ours, there is a flat spot right where the driver side tires go through, which reduces the 'whump' effect by about half and makes it easier on the car. But you have to be going slowly enough to guide your tire through the exact place.


There are many sleeping policemen in London which is probably understandable. But they are a nightmare when you are on the top of a double-decker bus with heavy shopping and trying to get down the stairs.

In my street they have adjusted the height of the humps at least three times, every time they get a little shallower, having disrupted travel down the road for three weeks whilst the adjustments are carried out.

They are slightly less noticeable on the single-decker "bendy buses" but as those are being phased out for the Route Master replacement...who knows.
Currently reading - Emergence of a Nation State by Alan Smith


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