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Trip to England

Been to someplace of historical interest? Planning a trip? Have a question? Post here!
Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Sun September 12th, 2010, 1:48 pm

but the atmosphere which is elegant but cosy in a kind of 1930s retro way.

Oh definitely, thats what got us to stop in our tracks and check it out. The first time we were there, we didn't have much money so just came in for some tea and soaked in the atmosphere . The white table cloths and piano player made us feel like we were rich beyond measure. Later trips tho....mmmmmmmmm yum. Glad to hear its still there, hope to visit again.

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EC2
Bibliomaniac
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Postby EC2 » Sun September 12th, 2010, 2:29 pm

Yes, layers are a very good idea and generally speaking it will get slightly colder the more northwards you go. At the moment I'm in short sleeved tee-shirts with a cardigan to hand just in case, because the evenings are drawing in and becoming chilly - but not so chilly that I need to put the heating on. However, another month will probably change that.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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Madeleine
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: A Trail through Time by Jodi Taylor & Angel by L J Ross
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Postby Madeleine » Sun September 12th, 2010, 4:17 pm

Yes it can get pretty chilly especially in the evenings, and it will also be dark earlier which will add to the brrr factor. I'd say take a fleece, and also an umbrella or light raincoat, preferably a fold-up one that you can put in a bag, basically be prepared for anything! However there can be some beautiful autumn days too, and it can get surprisingly warm.
Currently reading "A Trail through Time" by Jodi Taylor & "Angel" by L J Ross

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Tanzanite
Bibliophile
Location: Northern Virginia
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Postby Tanzanite » Sun September 12th, 2010, 5:38 pm

Layers are a way of life in Denver. This time of year you could really use the air conditioning and the heat in a 24 hour period (a couple of mornings ago it was 39 degrees when I left for work but the afternoon high later that day was in the 90's. When we were in Wales last year in was very cloudy and misty/light rain most of the time we were there. I didn't mind getting wet - plus it seemed to add some atmosphere to the castle ruins and especially at Tintern Abbey. When we went to Disney World several years ago it was pouring down rain - we just got some of those bright yellow rain ponchos and didn't have to wait in line for any of the rides and could ride them several times - sometimes we were the only ones on them! They closed the rides down for about an hour due to some lightening but we had a great time despite the rain and probably more so because of it!

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Madeleine
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: A Trail through Time by Jodi Taylor & Angel by L J Ross
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Postby Madeleine » Mon September 20th, 2010, 1:32 pm

One word of warning when you're in Scotland - beware the midges! I was there end of October in the Pitlochry area (north east, between Edinburgh and Inverness) and they were huge! So take some insect stuff with you if you're venturing into the countryside. I had lovely ankle chains of bites.....
Currently reading "A Trail through Time" by Jodi Taylor & "Angel" by L J Ross

Minnie

Postby Minnie » Mon September 20th, 2010, 5:55 pm

What a terrific trip, Tanzanite - and there's been so much in the way of good advice already on this thread.
I'd just add a word of warning about E Anglia: poorly served by road network, so getting around takes more time than you might think. And the place is stuffed with sights-worth-seeing - not merely Ely, but also Norwich, Bury St Edmunds, and a clutch of glorious manors and stately homes (including birthplace of Anne Boleyn).
Don't miss Lincoln Cathedral, whatever you do/wherever you go - and say 'hello' to the Imp!
I agree with all the posters who've recommended the following:

Re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings (these chaps know their stuff!)
Ightham Mote
York
Northumberland (Alnwich, Bamburgh, Lindisfare if poss) - and don't miss Durham en route there!

If straying on the other side of the country, yes, Stokesay's fab - and it's not far from Shrewsbury, which is a great place for a few hours' wandering (with or without Cadfael and Hugh Berenger - first home of Charles Darwin, also; battlefield where Hotspur died not far outside).
Pleased to see you visited Tintern on your last trip (my house was a few miles upriver). Did you visit Penallt Old Church (one of Wm Marshal's foundations)? Gorgeous spot.
Hope you'll be seeing something of the enormous riches of historic Somerset if you haven't already. If not, I could tell you about some wondrous places, many hidden away. But as inclined to blather for ages about 'em, will spare you!

Am sure you'll have a fab time, anyway. Wish you bon voyage :) .

Minnie

Postby Minnie » Mon September 20th, 2010, 6:13 pm

Aaarrkkkkhhh, Tanzanite, did I really type 'Alnwich'? For shame! I apologise to all good Geordies (and Lads of Alnwick). AlnwicK!
If you are travelling to York & Scotland, do check out Beverley online to see if it tempts you. Lovely market town with lots of interesting buildings & a big, bold beautiful minster (notable for stonemasons who were into de bangin' choons - or, rather, plentiful carvings of medieval musicians, if you're interested). Also stunningly unspoilt (off the beaten track, let alone tourist routes).

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Tanzanite
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Location: Northern Virginia
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Postby Tanzanite » Tue September 21st, 2010, 12:29 am

"Madeleine" wrote:One word of warning when you're in Scotland - beware the midges! I was there end of October in the Pitlochry area (north east, between Edinburgh and Inverness) and they were huge! So take some insect stuff with you if you're venturing into the countryside. I had lovely ankle chains of bites.....


Thanks for the tip - is a midge like a mosquito??

Also, I really appreciate everyone's ideas and thoughts. I really wish I could just take 6 months off and live there for a while, but unfortunately there are bills and college tuition to pay...

I'll be blogging about the trip when we get back (on the same blog I used for the last trip!)

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Tue September 21st, 2010, 3:31 am

I'd forgotten about Beverly; it was one of the smaller places we went to in our hunt for Miserichords and we found some lovely ones in their cathedral. We happened to be there on market day and it was great fun.

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Madeleine
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: A Trail through Time by Jodi Taylor & Angel by L J Ross
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Postby Madeleine » Tue September 21st, 2010, 11:09 am

"Tanzanite" wrote:Thanks for the tip - is a midge like a mosquito??Also, I really appreciate everyone's ideas and thoughts. I really wish I could just take 6 months off and live there for a while, but unfortunately there are bills and college tuition to pay...

I'll be blogging about the trip when we get back (on the same blog I used for the last trip!)


Yup, just as pesky and judging by the ones I saw, about 6 times bigger! :eek: :mad:
Currently reading "A Trail through Time" by Jodi Taylor & "Angel" by L J Ross


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