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September 2010: What Are You Reading?

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Ash
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Location: Arizona, USA

Post by Ash » Mon September 27th, 2010, 1:52 pm

I was so excited about Children's Book (Possession is on my all time favorite book list), but also couldn't get passed the first chapter.

Finishing up my reread of Wolf Hall. My sis and I keep finding interesting bits re theatre. She reminded me that much of the scenes that the lawyers do in the book actually happened, often in a cul de sac in the temple area, which is how the Globe theatre got its shape. I also didn't realize how much Henry XIII was involved in theatre at that time.

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JoshuaKaitlyn
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Location: Manchester UK

Post by JoshuaKaitlyn » Mon September 27th, 2010, 2:00 pm

Finished 'The Principessa' - Christie Dickason, (disappointing). Now starting 'Vlad' - C.C. Humphreys.
Alea Jacta Est

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sweetpotatoboy
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Post by sweetpotatoboy » Mon September 27th, 2010, 3:05 pm

[quote=""Ash""]I was so excited about Children's Book (Possession is on my all time favorite book list), but also couldn't get passed the first chapter.
[/quote]

My mum's been trying to read that one for months, for a book group. She doesn't appear able to make any progress...

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Brenna
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Post by Brenna » Mon September 27th, 2010, 3:23 pm

Finished Marsh King's Daughter last night and started Jack Whyte's The Saxon Shore
Brenna

Russ Whitfield
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Post by Russ Whitfield » Mon September 27th, 2010, 4:14 pm

I've always quite fancied Jack Whyte's series, but I've not quite got round to sorting out ordering it. Things to do list!

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Miss Moppet
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Post by Miss Moppet » Mon September 27th, 2010, 6:12 pm

[quote=""Leo62""]Will be interested to hear your opinion of this one. I really liked the sound of it, but couldn't get past the first chapter...[/quote]

A lot of the reviews are disappointed, but I really like the sound of it too so I'm going to give it a try - from the library though.

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cw gortner
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Post by cw gortner » Mon September 27th, 2010, 6:18 pm

Finished The Astronomer. The anarchronistic potato made its appearance in one line: the characters stop at an inn and eat a hearty "potato stew." That was it. Overall, it was a fun read, an adventure story, really, not too heavy on the theological aspects.

Just started The Eight by Katherine Neville.
THE QUEEN'S VOW available on June 12, 2012!
THE TUDOR SECRET, Book I in the Elizabeth I Spymaster Chronicles
THE CONFESSIONS OF CATHERINE DE MEDICI
THE LAST QUEEN


www.cwgortner.com

annis
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Post by annis » Mon September 27th, 2010, 6:54 pm

Posted by CW
Finished The Astronomer. The anarchronistic potato made its appearance in one line: the characters stop at an inn and eat a hearty "potato stew." That was it. Overall, it was a fun read, an adventure story, really, not too heavy on the theological aspects.
Although blatant historical errors can be irritating, sometimes readers can get too focused on nitpicking and forget to just enjoy the story! The anachronistic potato is mentioned only once yet that particular reviewer hardly discussed anything else about the novel-- maybe the reviewer doesn't get out much---

Still reading and enjoying Robyn Young's Insurrection. The ruthless Edward I is now just about to take over Scotland's kingship for himself, and to make the point, has sent some of his men to steal away with the sacred Stone of Scone, the most potent symbol of Scottish kingship. Interestingly recent excavations have confirmed the ancient nature of Moot Hill, where the Stone was originally situated (there's only a replica there now).

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Ludmilla
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Post by Ludmilla » Mon September 27th, 2010, 7:56 pm

[quote=""annis""]
Although blatant historical errors can be irritating, sometimes readers can get too focused on nitpicking and forget to just enjoy the story! The anachronistic potato is mentioned only once yet that particular reviewer hardly discussed anything else about the novel-- maybe the reviewer doesn't get out much---

[/quote]

Some people do seem to get a perverse sense of pleasure pointing out the mistakes of others, often quite disproportionate to the error that was committed. I also wonder if sometimes these so-called mistakes occur because the editor or publisher insists on dumbing down the material (or in some cases using a generalized word as a substitute for the specific or a related, better known word) for the mass consumer.

I'm in between books deciding what to read next. Finished Ryszard Kapuściński 's Imperium (NF) over the weekend, which was excellent.

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Kasthu
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Post by Kasthu » Mon September 27th, 2010, 10:55 pm

Now reading Told By an Idiot, historical fiction in a sense.

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