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EC2
Bibliomaniac
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Postby EC2 » Wed August 6th, 2014, 1:51 pm

"LadyB" wrote:
My horses are being fed corn though, I don't think we're meant to have corn in this part of the world yet, are we?


Corn in the English language outside of the USA is any sort of cereal crop and comes from an Anglo Saxon word. Many times UK authors will get seized upon by American readers for talking about corn in a historical context when everyone knows that corn is a New World crop don't they? Only it ain't. I am surrounded by ripe cornfields at the moment where I live and they are all either wheat or barley. What the US calls corn, we call sweetcorn. Lindsey Davis had a rant about it once. :-) Scroll down for her 'Corny Rant' x2 http://www.lindseydavis.co.uk/features/rants/
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

User avatar
Lisa
Bibliophile
Favorite HF book: Here Be Dragons by Sharon Kay Penman
Preferred HF: Any time period/location. Timeslip, usually prefer female POV. Also love Gothic melodrama.
Location: Northeast Scotland

Postby Lisa » Wed August 6th, 2014, 3:26 pm

"EC2" wrote:Corn in the English language outside of the USA is any sort of cereal crop and comes from an Anglo Saxon word. Many times UK authors will get seized upon by American readers for talking about corn in a historical context when everyone knows that corn is a New World crop don't they? Only it ain't. I am surrounded by ripe cornfields at the moment where I live and they are all either wheat or barley. What the US calls corn, we call sweetcorn. Lindsey Davis had a rant about it once. :-) Scroll down for her 'Corny Rant' x2 http://www.lindseydavis.co.uk/features/rants/


I had no idea! I've become Americani[sz]ed, oh no... :p

Thanks for pointing that out though, she definitely wrote corn, not maize, so I will take it to mean 'generic crop'. After the author's foreword, in which she explained her process of writing historical fiction stories and trying to get the facts right, it did come as a surprise!

User avatar
EC2
Bibliomaniac
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Postby EC2 » Wed August 6th, 2014, 5:16 pm

"LadyB" wrote:I had no idea! I've become Americani[sz]ed, oh no... :p

Thanks for pointing that out though, she definitely wrote corn, not maize, so I will take it to mean 'generic crop'. After the author's foreword, in which she explained her process of writing historical fiction stories and trying to get the facts right, it did come as a surprise!


LOL! I thought after I wrote it that you weren't American!
I thought Lyndsey's rant was a bit near the knuckle, but entertaining. :-)

I was wondering afterwards though if horses ate grain/corn in the form of wheat or barley. I know they eat oats - which would be called corn in the field, but if you were feeding them to a horse they'd be called oats rather than corn, so I need now to gen up on my own historical horsey fodder! :)
Les proz e les vassals

Souvent entre piez de chevals

Kar ja li coard n’I chasront



'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'


Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal



www.elizabethchadwick.com

User avatar
Nefret
Bibliomaniac
Favorite HF book: Welsh Princes trilogy
Preferred HF: The Middle Ages (England), New Kingdom Egypt, Medieval France
Location: Temple of Isis

Postby Nefret » Wed August 6th, 2014, 10:56 pm

I think we went over the corn/grain regional thing a bit in one of my cooking classes (or maybe it was baking). What I think of as corn is also known as maize. Most of it produced here goes to feeding livestock.
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

User avatar
Lisa
Bibliophile
Favorite HF book: Here Be Dragons by Sharon Kay Penman
Preferred HF: Any time period/location. Timeslip, usually prefer female POV. Also love Gothic melodrama.
Location: Northeast Scotland

Postby Lisa » Thu August 7th, 2014, 8:34 am

"EC2" wrote:LOL! I thought after I wrote it that you weren't American!
I thought Lyndsey's rant was a bit near the knuckle, but entertaining. :-)

I was wondering afterwards though if horses ate grain/corn in the form of wheat or barley. I know they eat oats - which would be called corn in the field, but if you were feeding them to a horse they'd be called oats rather than corn, so I need now to gen up on my own historical horsey fodder! :)


They're in Paris, so I don't think it would be oats. I know they don't tend to grow oats in France nowadays anyway, not sure if that would have changed since the 9th century. So I suppose it'll be wheat or barley, but according to this article that's not the best feed for a horse, unless it's cooked. But then I don't think it would be referred to as corn if it had been cooked...

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EC2
Bibliomaniac
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Postby EC2 » Thu August 7th, 2014, 11:37 am

That's very interesting Lady B. My general knowledge has been expanded! :) I had no idea that a horse's stomach was only the size of a rugby ball! They definitely wouldn't call oats corn when it came to horse fodder, and like you I don't think they'd be feeding wheat to the horse. Hmmm...
Les proz e les vassals

Souvent entre piez de chevals

Kar ja li coard n’I chasront



'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'


Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal



www.elizabethchadwick.com

User avatar
Lisa
Bibliophile
Favorite HF book: Here Be Dragons by Sharon Kay Penman
Preferred HF: Any time period/location. Timeslip, usually prefer female POV. Also love Gothic melodrama.
Location: Northeast Scotland

Postby Lisa » Thu August 7th, 2014, 2:30 pm

"EC2" wrote:That's very interesting Lady B. My general knowledge has been expanded! :) I had no idea that a horse's stomach was only the size of a rugby ball! They definitely wouldn't call oats corn when it came to horse fodder, and like you I don't think they'd be feeding wheat to the horse. Hmmm...


Too bad Naomi Mitchison isn't around any more to ask. And now I'm wondering which crop she's referring to in The Corn King and the Spring Queen... ;)

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DianeL
Bibliophile
Location: Midatlantic east coast, United States
Contact:

Postby DianeL » Fri August 8th, 2014, 11:04 pm

I now want to always spell this word "Americaniszed."
:)
Last edited by DianeL on Fri August 8th, 2014, 11:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

***

The pre-modern world was willing to attribute charisma to women well before it was willing to attribute sustained rationality to them.
---Medieval Kingship, Henry A. Myers

***

http://dianelmajor.blogspot.com/
I'm a Twit: @DianeLMajor

User avatar
Nefret
Bibliomaniac
Favorite HF book: Welsh Princes trilogy
Preferred HF: The Middle Ages (England), New Kingdom Egypt, Medieval France
Location: Temple of Isis

Postby Nefret » Sun August 10th, 2014, 4:49 am

"DianeL" wrote:I now want to always spell this word "Americaniszed."
:)


Don't get things American Sized, except maybe corn.
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

User avatar
Madeleine
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Body in the Ice by A J Mackenzie & A Death in the Dales by Julia Chapman
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Postby Madeleine » Mon August 18th, 2014, 8:21 am

I'm now also in New York.
Currently reading "The Body in the Ice" by A J Mackenzie & "A Death in the Dales" by Julia Chapman


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