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Is this UK's oldest home?

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Rowan
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Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
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Is this UK's oldest home?

Postby Rowan » Wed August 11th, 2010, 7:32 pm

Video included in original story. :)

LONDON – Archaeologists have uncovered the site of Britain's oldest house, the waterside home of nomad hunters dating back about 11,000 years.

The dwelling, which has lake views, a thatched roof and very original features, predates the country's famous Stonehenge monument by around 6,000 years and was built at a time when Britain was still connected to continental Europe.

Teams from the University of York and the University of Manchester working at the site believe the circular shaped home was built in about 8,500 B.C. next to an ancient lake at Star Carr, near Scarborough, in northeastern England.

"This is a sensational discovery and tells us so much about the people who lived at this time," Nicky Milner from the University of York said Wednesday. "From this excavation, we gain a vivid picture of how these people lived."

Discoveries made at the site suggest the house was about 3.5 meters wide (11 feet, 6 inches), constructed of timber posts and likely had a roof of thatched reeds. The site was probably inhabited for between 200 and 500 years, and there were possibly several homes built at the site.

Archaeologists have also uncovered a 11,000-year-old tree trunk, with its bark still intact, and found traces of a wooden jetty-like platform on the bank of the ancient lake that could be the first evidence of carpentry in Europe.

The house is about 500 to 1,000 years older than a building in Howick, northern England, previously thought to have been the country's oldest home.


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Vaughn Entwistle
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Location: Seattle, Washington

oldest house in Britain

Postby Vaughn Entwistle » Thu August 12th, 2010, 3:12 pm

Excellent post, Rowan.

Thanks for bringing this gem to our attention.

Vaughn

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Divia
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Postby Divia » Thu August 12th, 2010, 4:36 pm

This is way cool. I love it!
Thanks for sharing.
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Libby
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Postby Libby » Thu August 12th, 2010, 8:04 pm

That's interesting! Thanks.
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michellemoran
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Postby michellemoran » Fri August 13th, 2010, 7:42 pm

Great post, Rowan. I love discoveries like this!
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LoveHistory
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Postby LoveHistory » Tue August 17th, 2010, 1:31 pm

Fun find, but I must have missed where in the article the "very original features" of the structure were listed.

Like this bit though: " It's thought they...had rituals that involved the use of headdresses fashioned from animal skulls." Maybe they just liked mounting the heads on their walls.


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