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Poll: September 2010 BOTM

Retired Threads

What Should Be Our September 2010 Book of the Month?

Poll ended at Mon August 9th, 2010, 4:36 pm

The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom
2
12%
Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier
4
24%
My Name is Mary Sutter by Robin Oliveira
11
65%
 
Total votes: 17

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boswellbaxter
Bibliomaniac
Location: North Carolina
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Poll: September 2010 BOTM

Postby boswellbaxter » Mon August 2nd, 2010, 4:35 pm

Per the proposal that followed last month's poll, for September we will have a runoff between the three books that tied for second place in August. For October we will start fresh with a new set of nominations.

The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom



When a white servant girl violates the order of plantation society, she unleashes a tragedy that exposes the worst and best in the people she has come to call her family. Orphaned while onboard ship from Ireland, seven-year-old Lavinia arrives on the steps of a tobacco plantation where she is to live and work with the slaves of the kitchen house. Under the care of Belle, the master's illegitimate daughter, Lavinia becomes deeply bonded to her adopted family, though she is set apart from them by her white skin.
Eventually, Lavinia is accepted into the world of the big house, where the master is absent and the mistress battles opium addiction. Lavinia finds herself perilously straddling two very different worlds. When she is forced to make a choice, loyalties are brought into question, dangerous truths are laid bare, and lives are put at risk.
The Kitchen House is a tragic story of page-turning suspense, exploring the meaning of family, where love and loyalty prevail.
Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier



In 1997, Charles Frazier’s debut novel Cold Mountain made publishing history when it sailed to the top of The New York Times best-seller list for sixty-one weeks, won numerous literary awards, including the National Book Award, and went on to sell over three million copies. Now, the beloved American epic returns, reissued by Grove Press to coincide with the publication of Frazier’s eagerly-anticipated second novel, Thirteen Moons. Sorely wounded and fatally disillusioned in the fighting at Petersburg, a Confederate soldier named Inman decides to walk back to his home in the Blue Ridge mountains to Ada, the woman he loves. His trek across the disintegrating South brings him into intimate and sometimes lethal converse with slaves and marauders, bounty hunters and witches, both helpful and malign. At the same time, the intrepid Ada is trying to revive her father’s derelict farm and learning to survive in a world where the old certainties have been swept away. As it interweaves their stories, Cold Mountain asserts itself as an authentic odyssey, hugely powerful, majestically lovely, and keenly moving.
My Name is Mary Sutter by Robin Oliveira



In this stunning first novel, Mary Sutter is a brilliant, head*strong midwife from Albany, New York, who dreams of becoming a surgeon. Determined to overcome the prejudices against women in medicine-and eager to run away from her recent heartbreak- Mary leaves home and travels to Washington, D.C. to help tend the legions of Civil War wounded. Under the guidance of William Stipp and James Blevens-two surgeons who fall unwittingly in love with Mary's courage, will, and stubbornness in the face of suffering-and resisting her mother's pleas to return home to help with the birth of her twin sister's baby, Mary pursues her medical career in the desperately overwhelmed hospitals of the capital.

Like Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain and Robert Hicks's The Widow of the South, My Name Is Mary Sutter powerfully evokes the atmosphere of the period. Rich with historical detail (including marvelous depictions of Lincoln, Dorothea Dix, General McClellan, and John Hay among others), and full of the tragedies and challenges of wartime, My Name Is Mary Sutter is an exceptional novel. And in Mary herself, Robin Oliveira has created a truly unforgettable heroine whose unwavering determination and vulnerability will resonate with readers everywhere.
Susan Higginbotham
Coming in October: The Woodvilles


http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/
http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/

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Brenna
Bibliophile
Location: Delaware

Postby Brenna » Wed August 4th, 2010, 2:17 pm

My Name is Mary Sutter has my vote!
Brenna

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Wed August 11th, 2010, 9:42 pm

"Brenna" wrote:My Name is Mary Sutter has my vote!


Looks like we have a winner.
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

User avatar
Brenna
Bibliophile
Location: Delaware

Postby Brenna » Thu August 12th, 2010, 2:51 pm

Yeah the only problem is I am request # 20 at my library! I have awhile to wait it seems. Unless I go out and buy it :-)
Brenna

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Divia
Bibliomaniac
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Postby Divia » Thu August 12th, 2010, 4:31 pm

"Brenna" wrote:Yeah the only problem is I am request # 20 at my library! I have awhile to wait it seems. Unless I go out and buy it :-)


If we had done this months ago I could have given you my ARC.

Can I just say YAY for American Historical Fiction. Its been 3 months of it(I think)
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

User avatar
Brenna
Bibliophile
Location: Delaware

Postby Brenna » Thu August 12th, 2010, 6:18 pm

[QUOTE=Divia;67161]If we had done this months ago I could have given you my ARC.

I've been wanting to ask this question for weeks. What does ARC stand for? Thank you for the offer Divia, that is very sweet of you!
Brenna

User avatar
Divia
Bibliomaniac
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Postby Divia » Thu August 12th, 2010, 8:30 pm

advance readers copy they give them out before the book is published.

It would have been sweeter if I had the book. Sorry. :(

We do that around here though. :) Thats one reason I love this place. We help each other out.
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.

http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/


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