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B&Bs

Been to someplace of historical interest? Planning a trip? Have a question? Post here!
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Libby
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Location: Lancashire
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Postby Libby » Tue July 20th, 2010, 10:08 am

The visitor centre at Bosworth is still in the same place. The actual battlefield is on private land so nothing will move.

The 'tarriff' is the price of the room, not the tax.
By Loyalty Bound - the story of the mistress of Richard III.

http://www.elizabethashworth.com

Carla
Compulsive Reader
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Postby Carla » Tue July 20th, 2010, 2:11 pm

"robinbird79" wrote:Also...I am assuming the "tariff" I see mentioned on most sites is the tax on the room?


Please keep the information coming! I'm nervous about planning a trip overseas by myself!


'Tariff' usually means the price, so if a site says "Tariff: £25 per person per night B&B" it means you pay £25 for bed and breakfast. It's common to quote prices based on 2 people sharing a room, so if you're travelling on your own it's as well to check specifically the cost for a single room or single occupancy of a double room. Some establishments will charge a single person in a double room the same price as they would charge for two people; others charge a single person in a double room just the per-person rate; others charge something in between.
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords
Website: http://www.carlanayland.org
Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com

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robinbird79
Avid Reader
Location: Georgia

Postby robinbird79 » Thu July 22nd, 2010, 1:52 pm

Oh! Thanks for that info about the tariff! I was thinking that was added on top of other prices they had listed and I was concerned about how much that was going to cost me (since exchange rates are so horrible at the moment).

I had noted that most say the price is per person per night so going with my hubby will double the amount.

SGM - Thanks for that bit of info about the trail to the new battle site. It is something I am determined to visit. :)
Currently Reading: Crown in Candlelight, R. H. Jarmen

http://almostcrazymommy.blogspot.com

SGM
Compulsive Reader

Postby SGM » Thu July 22nd, 2010, 9:04 pm

I hope you enjoy it. It's not really my period of history and generally I skip battles (very helpful ruse if you are reading War and Peace). However, Stephen Porter has just published a book called The Battle For London about the Battle of Turnham Green during the English Civil War and as I sail past the stop for Turnham Green on the tube every day, I have decided I may well have to visit it as London and the history of the Civil War are two of my passions.

Mind you so are Sussex and the South Downs so I went and celebrated the several Battles of Beachy Head (most of which we lost) last year and revelled in the glories of Beachy Head itself. So I understand your desire.
Last edited by SGM on Thu July 22nd, 2010, 9:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Currently reading - Emergence of a Nation State by Alan Smith

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Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Tue July 27th, 2010, 8:47 pm

"SGM" wrote:London and the history of the Civil War are two of my passions.



I am absolutely fascinated by the history of London (and I hope to visit the city someday, as well). I read London by Edward Rutherfurd many years ago and loved it. Are there any other good histories (either HF or NF) of London that you could recommend?

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Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Outcasts of Time by Ian Mortimer
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Postby Vanessa » Tue July 27th, 2010, 9:44 pm

London Belongs to Me by Norman Collins. I haven't read it but it's on my list to read this year. It's supposedly very good. It's a modern classic.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Wed July 28th, 2010, 2:42 pm

Its not for everyone, but Thames: Sacred River by Peter Ackroyd might fit the bill. I found him all over the place, and hard to follow. But there is some history as he tells the story of the river.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Thames-Sacred-River-Peter-Ackroyd/dp/0099422557

SGM
Compulsive Reader

Postby SGM » Wed July 28th, 2010, 7:16 pm

"Michy" wrote:I am absolutely fascinated by the history of London (and I hope to visit the city someday, as well). I read London by Edward Rutherfurd many years ago and loved it. Are there any other good histories (either HF or NF) of London that you could recommend?


Stephen Inwood's: A History of London
Celina Fox: Londoners (which accompanied the exhibition by the Museum of London)
Walking Shakespeare's London (contains 20 walks). I prefer this period to the typical Dickensian stuff.
Pepys Diary (this is one of my favourite books of all time)
Maureen Waller: 1700 Scenes from London Life
Sam Taylor: East of Islington (but it is just a little quirky and you might need to know the area and the humour might not translate)

I have a really good book which it turns out must the same one that the guides on the river tours use (all those little anecdotes) -- I can't remember its name because I lent it to my brother but will get it back and let you know.

Don't just concentrate on the big tomes covering the whole two thousand years though. The real gems are the ones that concentrate on a small part of it.

Off hand, though I can't particularly think of any fiction but most of Forever Amber takes place in London during the Restoration and although I don't like the characters or the story particularly it is incredibly well set (especially considering the writer had never been to England let alone London). Some the Dickens' Novels will possibly fit the bill and Scott's The Fortunes of Nigel is (I seem to remember) set mostly in London. But Scott can be a bit of a trawl.

But my sister recommends the DVD Martha Meets Frank Daniel and Lawrence as giving a really good visual of London. It has the benefit of having Joseph Fiennes (to my mind) in it (and unfortunately Rufus Sewell) although it is one of those rather formulaic British comedies (a la Richard Curtis although not sure he did this one) we have now come to expect (ie intended for a more international audience). Shakespeare in Love shows the Globe off really well (and has the benefit of having Joseph Fiennes and Geoffrey Rush in it). Geoffrey Rush was wonderful as Mr Henslow.

Try this link for further ideas: http://www.fodors.com/community/europe/books-set-in-london-england.cfm
Last edited by SGM on Wed July 28th, 2010, 7:46 pm, edited 3 times in total.
Currently reading - Emergence of a Nation State by Alan Smith

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Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Wed July 28th, 2010, 7:57 pm

Thank you for the recommendations. They sound wonderful and many of them are available through my library. :)

SGM
Compulsive Reader

Postby SGM » Wed July 28th, 2010, 8:26 pm

"Michy" wrote:Thank you for the recommendations. They sound wonderful and many of them are available through my library. :)


If you decide to delve into Pepys, the diary is available online through Gutenberg and Archive.org but also use the website because it lists most of the places mentioned and what they are now called or what happened to them. It also gives details of the people mentioned in the diary. The joys of being out of copyright. The diary is 350 years old this year. Also of interest is a book called The Plot against Pepys -- and, of course, Dr Johnson's London.

The link for the website is: http://www.pepysdiary.com

Enjoy.
Currently reading - Emergence of a Nation State by Alan Smith


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