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65 years ago. A Rescue at Hiroshima?

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fljustice
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Postby fljustice » Sun July 25th, 2010, 3:22 pm

What a great career! I'm a science geek, but purely amateur. I was hoping my daughter might take the road I missed, but she's got her sights firmly set on an English major. (sigh) Now we're saving up for graduate school.
Faith L. Justice, Author Website
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e.West
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Postby e.West » Mon August 2nd, 2010, 3:40 am

@Ash: Spoiling the grandchild is what we're about. As Farragut might have said at Mobile Bay, Damn the Parents! Full speed ahead on the Big Wheels and the Chocolate!

@fljustice: Jeez. An English major. Her thesis in grad school should be how to teach geeks to write. Get her a job a MIT or Caltech anytime.

--e.West

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fljustice
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Postby fljustice » Mon August 2nd, 2010, 7:56 pm

"e.West" wrote:Jeez. An English major. Her thesis in grad school should be how to teach geeks to write. Get her a job a MIT or Caltech anytime.

--e.West


Actually, I've told her, if she can write a good solid paragraph (and she can) she can get a job anywhere, because so few people know how to write well these days. Her journalist father and novelist mother were just hoping the apple would drop a little farther from the tree. :rolleyes:
Faith L. Justice, Author Website

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e.West
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Postby e.West » Tue August 3rd, 2010, 12:07 am

@fljustice: None of my business, really, but I would have her father journalist explain the realities of the usefulness of a college degree [see http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703720504575377140202306852.html?KEYWORDS=ignorance+by+degrees if you can't get the article, let me know] plus the fact that 15% of all USPS letter carriers have college degrees. [ see: [url]http://www.newyorker.com/talk/comment/2010/06/07/100607taco_talk_mead][/url]

She could probably take a 90-day online course in technical writing and set up her own shop on the 91st day, instead of waiting for 4 years to be in debt and un-hireable with an English degree.

But, what do I know?

--e.West

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fljustice
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Postby fljustice » Tue August 3rd, 2010, 6:34 pm

"e.West" wrote:She could probably take a 90-day online course in technical writing and set up her own shop on the 91st day, instead of waiting for 4 years to be in debt and un-hireable with an English degree. -e.West


You're absolutely right if you think of college as vocational training. And I'm not knocking vocational training in any way - I got my start working with the National Center for Vocational Education at OSU and believe we would be better off with more options in HS than general or college track. I've advised many a "liberal arts" college educated person to go into the trades where the baby boomers are dropping like flies, work can't be shipped overseas, and the money is good.

So why college? For every family it's different. We wanted the usual things for her - opportunity to study something she enjoys, social activities, access to a ready made network of alumni upon graduation. In addition, our daughter happens to be on the autistic spectrum (Asperger's Syndrome - super bright and heartbreakingly clueless.) College offers the additional time to hone her social skills and make the transition to independent life. I know that sounds like college as "special ed", but for us it's necessary.

Plus, the school we chose is known for its independent studies, so she'll learn key "transferable skills": writing, communication skills, and project management are among the most valuable she can master. She can take them anywhere and be successful. I've worked in law, manufacturing, banking, business-to-business and higher education (yes, I was one of the wretchedly underpaid adjunct professors) - if you can write, communicate socially and manage a complicated project, you can pick up the "content" on the job and be successful in almost anything (other than the technical fields! ;) )
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e.West
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Postby e.West » Fri August 6th, 2010, 5:25 am

@fljustice:

Far be it from me to be a college counselor; I count myself fortunate to get out of my own way on a daily basis. But I'm a great fan of junior colleges. They do not have the same wash 'em out early mindset---most really want the students to succeed. And depending on the college, they even have midnight classes for those who work during the day. I can't help but feeling that kids going through a JC first get more attention and more slack than University folk.

I still think she would be better off to be entrepreneural early--like right away, and doing JC for both social and educational needs.

But what do I know? Just a techno-geek writer. Reviewed by professional educators? You could get a front row seat at my auto de fe. Cheap.

e.West


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