Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Should Anne Frank's life be novelised? With added steam?

A place to debate issues or to rant about what's on your mind. In addition to discussions about historical fiction, books, the publishing industry, and history, discussions about current political, social, and religious issues and other topics are allowed, so those who are easily offended by certain topics may want to avoid such threads. Members are expected to keep the discussions friendly and polite and to avoid personal attacks on other members. The moderators reserve the right to shut down a thread without warning if they believe it necessary.
User avatar
Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Wed July 14th, 2010, 7:04 pm

"Miss Moppet" wrote:Actually I would be interested in reading a novel which focused on the betrayal and how it came about.


I would be interested, too, if it were based on some new facts that came to light. But I'm not interested in reading somebody's imagined version of what might have happened.

As to when enough time has passed, that's an interesting question and I'm sure the answer is different for everyone. Anne and her sister were approximately my mother's age (Margot was a year older and Anne was two years younger), and my mother is still living. So for me, that's too recent.

Incidentally, this discussion revived my interest in her diary. There is a version available on Amazon that presents three versions side-by-side: Anne's original, un-edited version (including pages that only came to light after her father's death); the version she herself revised with hopes of having it published after the war; and the further-revised version that her father had published in the 1950s. It's not cheap but it's very tempting.....

User avatar
Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Wed July 14th, 2010, 7:14 pm

"EC2" wrote:Another vote of disgust, distaste, and disbelief. I certainly shall not be reading or buying this work.


One can only hope that is how the majority of people will react.

Celia Hayes
Reader
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Contact:

Postby Celia Hayes » Thu July 15th, 2010, 10:23 pm

"Miss Moppet" wrote:. The house was overlooked by so many others and what I didn't realise, the annexe feature it had was a typical design feature for that type of house - so it would be easy for a neighbour to see a window open after working hours and put two and two together.


I read - I think in Melissa Muller's biography of Anne, that many of the neighbors did suspect that refugees were hiding in the Annex - and that a lot of them just looked away and pretended they didn't see or hear anything suspicious at all. For another project, I did a lot of research into the WWII underground - specifically the smuggling of shot-down aircrew - and I came around to think that the success of many of the escape-lines depended on lots of neighbors and passers-by ignoring a lot of things; like the presence of suspiciously fit and healthy-looking young men, odd noises in supposedly empty houses, oddly-dressed strangers in a small town, moving lights where there weren't supposed to be anyone ... there were people who did not or could not become involved in smuggling Jews or escaping aircrew - but a hell of a great many who looked in the other direction when it was happening right in front of them!
Celia Hayes
www.celiahayes.com

User avatar
Margaret
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: I can't answer this in 100 characters. Sorry.
Favorite HF book: Checkmate, the final novel in the Lymond series
Preferred HF: Literary novels. Late medieval and Renaissance.
Location: Catskill, New York, USA
Contact:

Postby Margaret » Fri July 16th, 2010, 4:12 am

There is a version available on Amazon that presents three versions side-by-side: Anne's original, un-edited version (including pages that only came to light after her father's death); the version she herself revised with hopes of having it published after the war; and the further-revised version that her father had published in the 1950s. It's not cheap but it's very tempting.....


Definitely tempting. I didn't know that Anne had prepared a revised version of her diary with the thought of publishing it. Do you know what the story is behind that? Did she revise it while they were still in the annex, or in the concentration camp?

I read - I think in Melissa Muller's biography of Anne, that many of the neighbors did suspect that refugees were hiding in the Annex - and that a lot of them just looked away and pretended they didn't see or hear anything suspicious at all. For another project, I did a lot of research into the WWII underground - specifically the smuggling of shot-down aircrew - and I came around to think that the success of many of the escape-lines depended on lots of neighbors and passers-by ignoring a lot of things; like the presence of suspiciously fit and healthy-looking young men, odd noises in supposedly empty houses, oddly-dressed strangers in a small town, moving lights where there weren't supposed to be anyone ... there were people who did not or could not become involved in smuggling Jews or escaping aircrew - but a hell of a great many who looked in the other direction when it was happening right in front of them!


I'm glad to know this. It sheds additional light on the complexity of living in Germany during these terrible years, and shows that some Germans did care about their neighbors and resist what was going on, each in their own way.
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings (probably well over 5000 by now, but I haven't re-counted lately) and over 700 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

User avatar
Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Fri July 16th, 2010, 5:18 am

"Margaret" wrote:Definitely tempting. I didn't know that Anne had prepared a revised version of her diary with the thought of publishing it. Do you know what the story is behind that? Did she revise it while they were still in the annex, or in the concentration camp?


Anne revised her diary while they were still in hiding. Her diary was left behind in the annex when they were taken away. Miep Gees -- who had been one of her father's employees and was one of the people who helped hide them -- found the diary and Anne's papers and kept them with the intention of giving them back to Anne after the war. Of course, Anne didn't survive the war, so Miep gave it to Anne's father.



I'm glad to know this. It sheds additional light on the complexity of living in Germany during these terrible years, and shows that some Germans did care about their neighbors and resist what was going on, each in their own way.


They were actually hiding in Amsterdam, not Germany. The Netherlands was, as a whole, much more sympathetic to the Jews. Of course, that's not to say there weren't secretive efforts in Germany, also, to help the Jews.
Last edited by Michy on Fri July 16th, 2010, 5:38 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Margaret
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: I can't answer this in 100 characters. Sorry.
Favorite HF book: Checkmate, the final novel in the Lymond series
Preferred HF: Literary novels. Late medieval and Renaissance.
Location: Catskill, New York, USA
Contact:

Postby Margaret » Fri July 16th, 2010, 8:39 pm

They were actually hiding in Amsterdam, not Germany. The Netherlands was, as a whole, much more sympathetic to the Jews.


That explains it. It's been so long since I read Diary that I had forgotten where they were hiding. There still seems to be a lingering resentment against Germans in the Netherlands, which undoubtedly stems from the Nazi era. I picked up on it when I traveled to Germany via a Netherlands airline which made a stop in, I think, Amsterdam.
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings (probably well over 5000 by now, but I haven't re-counted lately) and over 700 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

User avatar
Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Fri July 16th, 2010, 8:55 pm

Anne's father moved the family to the Netherlands shortly after Hitler came to power, in an effort to get away from the anti-Jewish laws that were being put in place in Germany.

Your comment about the Netherlands-Germany relationship is interesting. I knew a young woman many years ago who was from Austria but who had come here to go to college. She was my age -- born in the 60s -- but even during her growing up, she said Austrians struggled with feelings of guilt over their country's role in WWII, and also because Hitler originally came from Austria.

And then I heard on the news recently, some sort of stir over Germans expressing "too much nationalism" by exhibiting their flags, or something like that. I can't remember what the scenario was, it might have been the World Cup. Anyway, I guess since the end of WWII that has been somewhat frowned upon.

So the lingering effects of WWII are still being felt, and probably will be for some time to come.

User avatar
Margaret
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: I can't answer this in 100 characters. Sorry.
Favorite HF book: Checkmate, the final novel in the Lymond series
Preferred HF: Literary novels. Late medieval and Renaissance.
Location: Catskill, New York, USA
Contact:

Postby Margaret » Fri July 16th, 2010, 9:01 pm

some sort of stir over Germans expressing "too much nationalism" by exhibiting their flags


Yes, I vaguely recall this. I think it was at some international sports event where some of the German fans were waving German flags.

When I visited Germany, I found the lack of German flags quite noticeable. I can't remember seeing even one - they don't even fly them over the post office. Quite a contrast to the U.S.! If a German flew a German flag on his porch or from a flagpole in his yard, the way people do U.S. flags here, I imagine it would set off a really huge controversy!
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings (probably well over 5000 by now, but I haven't re-counted lately) and over 700 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

User avatar
LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Contact:

Postby LoveHistory » Fri July 16th, 2010, 9:04 pm

The Nazis are very active in Germany, and were even in the 1990s. My Mom's ex was living over there at that time and said that anti-anybody-who's-not-German sentiment was getting very high. He ended up quitting his job and moving back to the States because he felt it wasn't safe there for him anymore.

Whatever school my half-brothers were going to had already rewritten the history books to make Germany look not so bad in the WWII section.

Flags are the least of anyone's worries.

User avatar
Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Fri July 16th, 2010, 11:14 pm

I remember hearing about the rise of xenophobia in Germany back in the 90s. I don't ever hear about it anymore, so I thought (hoped) it had mostly gone away. :(


Return to “Debate/Rant Forum”