Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Poll: August 2010 Book of the Month

Retired Threads

What Should be Our August 2010 Book of the Month?

Poll ended at Thu July 15th, 2010, 12:43 pm

The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom
4
15%
Savage Lands by Clare Clark
1
4%
Into the Wilderness by Sara Donati
7
27%
North and South by John Jakes
2
8%
Private Life by Jane Smiley
1
4%
Sacajawea by Anna L. Waldo
1
4%
The Gates of the Alamo by Stephen Harrigan
1
4%
Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier
4
15%
My Theodosia by Anya Seton
1
4%
My Name is Mary Sutter by Robin Oliveira
4
15%
 
Total votes: 26

User avatar
boswellbaxter
Bibliomaniac
Location: North Carolina
Contact:

Poll: August 2010 Book of the Month

Postby boswellbaxter » Fri July 9th, 2010, 12:38 pm

The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom

When a white servant girl violates the order of plantation society, she unleashes a tragedy that exposes the worst and best in the people she has come to call her family. Orphaned while onboard ship from Ireland, seven-year-old Lavinia arrives on the steps of a tobacco plantation where she is to live and work with the slaves of the kitchen house. Under the care of Belle, the master's illegitimate daughter, Lavinia becomes deeply bonded to her adopted family, though she is set apart from them by her white skin.
Eventually, Lavinia is accepted into the world of the big house, where the master is absent and the mistress battles opium addiction. Lavinia finds herself perilously straddling two very different worlds. When she is forced to make a choice, loyalties are brought into question, dangerous truths are laid bare, and lives are put at risk.
The Kitchen House is a tragic story of page-turning suspense, exploring the meaning of family, where love and loyalty prevail.


Savage Lands by Clare Clark

It is 1704 and, while the Sun King Louis XIV rules France from the splendour of Versailles, Louisiana, the new and vast colony named in his honour, is home to fewer than two hundred souls. When a demand is sent requesting wives be dispatched for the struggling settlers, Elisabeth is among the twenty-three girls who set sail from France to be married to men of whom they know absolutely nothing. Educated and skeptical, Elisabeth has little hope for happiness in her new life. It is to her astonishment that she, alone among the brides, finds herself passionately in love with her new husband, Jean-Claude, a charismatic and ruthlessly ambitious soldier.
Auguste, a poor cabin boy from Rochefort, must also adjust to a startlingly unexpected future. Abandoned in a remote native village, he is charged by the colony’s governor with mastering the tribe’s strange language while reporting back on their activities. It is there that he is befriended by Elisabeth’s husband as he begins the slow process of assimilation back into life among the French.
The love Elisabeth and Auguste share for Jean-Claude changes both of their lives irrevocably. When in time he betrays them both, they find themselves bound together in ways they never anticipated.
With the same compelling prose and vividly realized characters that won her widespread acclaim for THE GREAT STINK and THE NATURE OF MONSTERS, Clare Clark takes us deep into the heart of colonial French Louisiana.




Into the Wilderness by Sara Donati

Weaving a tapestry of fact and fiction, Sara Donati’s epic novel sweeps us into another time and place…and into a breathtaking story of love and survival in a land of savage beauty.

It is December of 1792. Elizabeth Middleton leaves her comfortable English estate to join her family in a remote New York mountain village. It is a place unlike any she has ever experienced. And she meets a man unlike any she has ever encountered—a white man dressed like a Native American: Nathaniel Bonner, known to the Mohawk people as Between-Two-Lives. Determined to provide schooling for all the children of the village, Elizabeth soon finds herself locked in conflict with the local slave owners as well as with her own family. Interweaving the fate of the Mohawk Nation with the destiny of two lovers, Sara Donati’s compelling novel creates a complex, profound, passionate portait of an emerging America.


North and South by John Jakes

In the years before the Civil War, the Mains and Hazards achieve their triumphs and suffer their tragedies against the panorama of American history.


Private Life by Jane Smiley

A riveting new novel from the Pulitzer Prize–winner that traverses the intimate landscape of one woman’s life, from the 1880s to World War II.

Margaret Mayfield is nearly an old maid at twenty-seven in post–Civil War Missouri when she marries Captain Andrew Jackson Jefferson Early. He’s the most famous man their small town has ever produced: a naval officer and a brilliant astronomer—a genius who, according to the local paper, has changed the universe. Margaret’s mother calls the match “a piece of luck.”

Margaret is a good girl who has been raised to marry, yet Andrew confounds her expectations from the moment their train leaves for his naval base in faraway California. Soon she comes to understand that his devotion to science leaves precious little room for anything, or anyone, else. When personal tragedies strike and when national crises envelop the country, Margaret stands by her husband. But as World War II approaches, Andrew’s obsessions take a different, darker turn, and Margaret is forced to reconsider the life she has so carefully constructed.

Private Life is a beautiful evocation of a woman’s inner world: of the little girl within the hopeful bride, of the young woman filled with yearning, and of the faithful wife who comes to harbor a dangerous secret. But it is also a heartbreaking portrait of marriage and the mysteries that endure even in lives lived side by side; a wondrously evocative historical panorama; and, above all, a masterly, unforgettable novel from one of our finest storytellers.


Sacajawea by Anna L. Waldo

Clad in a doeskin, alone and unafraid, she stood straight and proud before the onrushing forces of America's destiny: Sacajawea, child of a Shoshoni chief, lone woman on Lewis and Clark's historic trek -- beautiful spear of a dying nation.She knew many men, walked many miles. From the whispering prairies, across the Great Divide to the crystal capped Rockies and on to the emerald promise of the Pacific Northwest, her story over flows with emotion and action ripped from the bursting fabric of a raw new land.
Ten years in the writing, SACAJAWEA unfolds an immense canvas of people and events, and captures the eternal longings of a woman who always yearned for one great passion -- and always it lay beyond the next mountain.


The Gates of the Alamo by Stephen Harrigan

A huge, riveting, deeply imagined novel about the siege and fall of the Alamo in 1836-an event that formed the consciousness of Texas and that resonates through American history-The Gates of the Alamo follows the lives of three people whose fates become bound to the now-fabled Texas fort: Edmund McGowan, a proud and gifted naturalist whose life's work is threatened by the war against Mexico; the resourceful, widowed innkeeper Mary Mott; and her sixteen-year-old son, Terrell, whose first shattering experience with love leads him instead to war, and into the crucible of the Alamo. The story unfolds with vivid immediacy and describes the pivotal battle from the perspective of the Mexican attackers as well as the American defenders. Filled with dramatic scenes, and abounding in fictional and historical personalities-among them James Bowie, David Crockett, William Travis, and General Santa Anna-The Gates of the Alamo enfolds us in history and, through its remarkable and passionate storytelling, allows us to participate at last in an American legend.


Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier

In 1997, Charles Frazier’s debut novel Cold Mountain made publishing history when it sailed to the top of The New York Times best-seller list for sixty-one weeks, won numerous literary awards, including the National Book Award, and went on to sell over three million copies. Now, the beloved American epic returns, reissued by Grove Press to coincide with the publication of Frazier’s eagerly-anticipated second novel, Thirteen Moons. Sorely wounded and fatally disillusioned in the fighting at Petersburg, a Confederate soldier named Inman decides to walk back to his home in the Blue Ridge mountains to Ada, the woman he loves. His trek across the disintegrating South brings him into intimate and sometimes lethal converse with slaves and marauders, bounty hunters and witches, both helpful and malign. At the same time, the intrepid Ada is trying to revive her father’s derelict farm and learning to survive in a world where the old certainties have been swept away. As it interweaves their stories, Cold Mountain asserts itself as an authentic odyssey, hugely powerful, majestically lovely, and keenly moving.


My Theodosia by Anya Seton

Anya Seton’s bestselling first novel, originally published in 1941, captures all the drama of the short life of Theodosia Burr (1783–1813).
Theodosia’s father is Aaron Burr--Thomas Jefferson’s vice president, most famous for his great duel with Alexander Hamilton. With charm and tenderness, he holds sway over young Theodosia’s heart, but his arrogance forces her to choose between the man he insists she marry and her love for a young soldier who will turn out to play a decisive role in her father’s fate. Persuaded by Aaron that she will soon be crowned princess of the Kingdom of Mexico as a result of his treasonable plans, she is received like royalty on Blennerhassett Island, only to end up trying to exonerate him as he awaits trial in a Richmond jail, repudiated by his fickle son-in-law and friends.
Theodosia remains a haunting figure in American history, still lovely, still imperious, never vanquished.





My Name is Mary Sutter by Robin Oliveira

In this stunning first novel, Mary Sutter is a brilliant, head*strong midwife from Albany, New York, who dreams of becoming a surgeon. Determined to overcome the prejudices against women in medicine-and eager to run away from her recent heartbreak- Mary leaves home and travels to Washington, D.C. to help tend the legions of Civil War wounded. Under the guidance of William Stipp and James Blevens-two surgeons who fall unwittingly in love with Mary's courage, will, and stubbornness in the face of suffering-and resisting her mother's pleas to return home to help with the birth of her twin sister's baby, Mary pursues her medical career in the desperately overwhelmed hospitals of the capital.

Like Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain and Robert Hicks's The Widow of the South, My Name Is Mary Sutter powerfully evokes the atmosphere of the period. Rich with historical detail (including marvelous depictions of Lincoln, Dorothea Dix, General McClellan, and John Hay among others), and full of the tragedies and challenges of wartime, My Name Is Mary Sutter is an exceptional novel. And in Mary herself, Robin Oliveira has created a truly unforgettable heroine whose unwavering determination and vulnerability will resonate with readers everywhere.
Susan Higginbotham
Coming in October: The Woodvilles


http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/
http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/

User avatar
Divia
Bibliomaniac
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Postby Divia » Fri July 9th, 2010, 12:46 pm

OMG American history! I'm so shocked I don't knwo what to do with myself. And yes I am being snarky. Its been a rough mourning and its only 8 Am.
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Fri July 9th, 2010, 12:52 pm

"Divia" wrote:OMG American history! I'm so shocked I don't knwo what to do with myself. And yes I am being snarky. Its been a rough mourning and its only 8 Am.


Yeah, and you were going during nomination time. I presumed to nominate one for you - hope that's OK....
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

User avatar
Divia
Bibliomaniac
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Postby Divia » Fri July 9th, 2010, 12:59 pm

"Misfit" wrote:Yeah, and you were going during nomination time. I presumed to nominate one for you - hope that's OK....


Thats cool. Which one was it :)
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.

http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

User avatar
Matt Phillips
Reader

Postby Matt Phillips » Tue July 13th, 2010, 7:46 pm

Savage Lands sounds intriguing, so I voted for it. I'd also be happy with Cold Mountain or North and South, though, since I recently read the former (well, last year, but I remember it vividly) and am re-reading the latter, the book that started it all for me way back when! After seeing the miniseries on TV, I read the first two books of the trilogy, then Jakes' Kent Family Chronicles, and my historical fiction addiction was born.

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Tue July 13th, 2010, 8:33 pm

"Divia" wrote:Thats cool. Which one was it :)


Mary Sutter. I think we're losing though
At home with a good book and the cat...

...is the only place I want to be

User avatar
Divia
Bibliomaniac
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Postby Divia » Tue July 13th, 2010, 9:15 pm

"Misfit" wrote:Mary Sutter. I think we're losing though


Figures. While I would have enjoyed to talk about the book with others it is what it is. We read it n' discussed the novel. :)
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.

http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

User avatar
boswellbaxter
Bibliomaniac
Location: North Carolina
Contact:

Postby boswellbaxter » Thu July 15th, 2010, 11:05 pm

Our winner:

Into the Wilderness by Sara Donati.
Susan Higginbotham

Coming in October: The Woodvilles





http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/

http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/

User avatar
boswellbaxter
Bibliomaniac
Location: North Carolina
Contact:

Postby boswellbaxter » Thu July 15th, 2010, 11:06 pm

Here's a suggestion: since we had three books tie for second place with 4 votes apiece, why don't we do a run-off in September for those three? Thoughts?
Susan Higginbotham

Coming in October: The Woodvilles





http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/

http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Thu July 15th, 2010, 11:26 pm

I like that idea.
At home with a good book and the cat...

...is the only place I want to be


Return to “Archives”