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UK treasure hunter finds 52,000 Roman coins

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Rowan
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Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
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UK treasure hunter finds 52,000 Roman coins

Postby Rowan » Thu July 8th, 2010, 5:03 pm

Some day I'm going to buy me a metal detector. I just told my friend that a cousin of mine used to sell them. Very nice ones. The kind that will show you what's in the soil, too. :D Though I can't imagine what a "funny signal" might be coming from a metal detector that's actually detected metal. :confused: :confused: :confused:

LONDON – A treasure hunter has found about 52,500 Roman coins, one of the largest such discoveries ever in Britain, officials said Thursday.

The hoard, which was valued at 3.3 million pounds ($5 million), includes hundreds of coins bearing the image of Marcus Aurelius Carausius, who seized power in Britain and northern France in the late third century and proclaimed himself emperor.

Dave Crisp, a treasure hunter using a metal detector, located the coins in April in a field in southwestern England, according to the Somerset County Council and the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

The coins were buried in a large jar about a foot (30 centimeters) deep and weighed about 160 kilograms (350 pounds) in all.

Crisp said a "funny signal" from his metal detector prompted him to start digging.


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annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Thu July 8th, 2010, 6:08 pm

Talk about hitting the jackpot :)

Rosemary Sutcliff's novel The Silver Branch deals with the tenure of Carausius and his overthrow by the usurper, Allectus. It certainly was a turbulent period

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parthianbow
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Location: Nr. Bristol, SW England
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Wow!

Postby parthianbow » Fri July 9th, 2010, 3:57 pm

Oh wow, oh wow! Thanks for posting, Rowan. The article mentions Somerset county council, which is the county I live in. That means it was found not too far away. Exciting! :D
Ben Kane
Bestselling author of Roman military fiction.
Spartacus - UK release 19 Jan. 2012. US release June 2012.

http://www.benkane.net
Twitter: @benkaneauthor

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LoveHistory
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Location: Wisconsin, USA
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Postby LoveHistory » Fri July 9th, 2010, 6:07 pm

Truly amazing! We don't have stuff like that in Wisconsin.

chuck
Bibliophile
Location: Ciinaminson NJ

Postby chuck » Fri July 9th, 2010, 8:00 pm

Great find....I wonder what the story is behind the coins being buried?.....Britain must have been very unstable......

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Rowan
Bibliophile
Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
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Postby Rowan » Sat July 10th, 2010, 1:13 pm

"LoveHistory" wrote:Truly amazing! We don't have stuff like that in Wisconsin.


Oh now I wouldn't say that LoveHistory. You don't know what you might find until you get out there with a metal detector.

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Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Sat July 10th, 2010, 2:43 pm

"Rowan" wrote:Oh now I wouldn't say that LoveHistory. You don't know what you might find until you get out there with a metal detector.


Well, whatever you might find, it's pretty safe to say it won't be ancient Roman coins! ;)

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LoveHistory
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Location: Wisconsin, USA
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Postby LoveHistory » Sat July 10th, 2010, 4:20 pm

Around here it's more likely I'd find old beer cans, and while they might be considered collectible, they wouldn't be worth much. ;)


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