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Cover for The Second Duchess

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Elizabeth
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Cover for The Second Duchess

Postby Elizabeth » Wed July 7th, 2010, 11:07 pm

THE RED LILY CROWN: A Novel of Medici Florence.
THE FLOWER READER.
THE SECOND DUCHESS.

www.elizabethloupas.com

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Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Wed July 7th, 2010, 11:10 pm

Very lovely. Just curious as to how much input authors are given (if any) in choosing covers for their books?

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Misfit
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Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Wed July 7th, 2010, 11:27 pm

Gorgeous, and with a full head no less.
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

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Anna Elliott
Compulsive Reader

Postby Anna Elliott » Thu July 8th, 2010, 12:20 am

That is truly gorgeous, Elizabeth!

And to answer your question, Michy, it depends on the publishing house, but I think most authors would say that they have at least some say in cover design. I've definitely had a voice in the art department's final pick, and actually had veto power on the initial design for my first book.
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Author of the Twilight of Avalon trilogy
new book: Dark Moon of Avalon, coming Sept 14 from Simon &Schuster (Touchstone)
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http://www.annaelliottbooks.com

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favorite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Postby MLE (Emily Cotton) » Thu July 8th, 2010, 12:39 am

Very nice cover. Hurrah for the full view!
I was looking at the gown with a re-enactor's eye. What decade is your book set in?

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Elizabeth
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Postby Elizabeth » Thu July 8th, 2010, 12:45 am

"MLE" wrote:Very nice cover. Hurrah for the full view!
I was looking at the gown with a re-enactor's eye. What decade is your book set in?


Thank you! It's set in 1565-66, in Ferrara, Italy. What does your re-enactor's eye discern?
THE RED LILY CROWN: A Novel of Medici Florence.
THE FLOWER READER.
THE SECOND DUCHESS.

www.elizabethloupas.com

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Elizabeth
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Postby Elizabeth » Thu July 8th, 2010, 12:51 am

"Michy" wrote:Very lovely. Just curious as to how much input authors are given (if any) in choosing covers for their books?


We had extensive discussions and I was encouraged to give as much input as I wanted, including pictures and paintings of gowns, of the city of Ferrara, and of Barbara of Austria herself. (I wanted a beagle puppy on the cover, as there are two pocket beagle puppies, wedding gifts from Queen Elizabeth Tudor, who play a part in the plot. Sadly, this was vetoed.) Once the initial design was created, I was again allowed to make comments and the design was actually modified in several ways based on my suggestions. So considering that this is my debut for NAL, I think they were more than fair.

And I do love the result. Although I still think a beagle puppy would have made it irresistible. :)
THE RED LILY CROWN: A Novel of Medici Florence.
THE FLOWER READER.
THE SECOND DUCHESS.

www.elizabethloupas.com

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favorite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Postby MLE (Emily Cotton) » Thu July 8th, 2010, 1:02 am

Nobody else will care, it's a pretty dress and gets the message of 'Ranaissance historical fiction' across very clearly. But overall it has an early-Tudor look. The puffed sleeves fit your date, and Italy, but the skirt should be longer--they swept the floor, hence the invention of a 'garde' or band of fabric decorating the hem which could be replaced or removed to launder separately.

Mostly the square neckline is what dates it. This came in fashion around 1450 and was on its way out by 1550. Of course, dresses were expensive and handed down for generations in more modest families, so outdated fashions might well be worn by the lower gentry. Also, from the 1560s to the end of the century, a ruff was de rigeur for both men and women.

By the 1550s, in both England and the continent, the 'wheel farthingale' was more in use. This made the skirts stand straight out from the waist, and then drop vertically. Although in Spain the cone-shaped 'verdugo' was also popular.

And she's wearing a French hood, which by this time was out of date in most places. Various hats, from the tall stovepipe to the jewelled cap, were more fashionable.

In either case, the bodice should be flat, allowing no curve for the breasts but pushing them up above the neck. Uncomfortable as heck, which is why I only play peasant.

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LoveHistory
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Location: Wisconsin, USA
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Postby LoveHistory » Thu July 8th, 2010, 2:11 am

Gorgeous cover, Elizabeth!

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Elizabeth
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Postby Elizabeth » Thu July 8th, 2010, 2:16 am

"MLE" wrote:Nobody else will care, it's a pretty dress and gets the message of 'Ranaissance historical fiction' across very clearly. But overall it has an early-Tudor look. The puffed sleeves fit your date, and Italy, but the skirt should be longer--they swept the floor, hence the invention of a 'garde' or band of fabric decorating the hem which could be replaced or removed to launder separately.

Mostly the square neckline is what dates it. This came in fashion around 1450 and was on its way out by 1550. Of course, dresses were expensive and handed down for generations in more modest families, so outdated fashions might well be worn by the lower gentry. Also, from the 1560s to the end of the century, a ruff was de rigeur for both men and women.

By the 1550s, in both England and the continent, the 'wheel farthingale' was more in use. This made the skirts stand straight out from the waist, and then drop vertically. Although in Spain the cone-shaped 'verdugo' was also popular.

And she's wearing a French hood, which by this time was out of date in most places. Various hats, from the tall stovepipe to the jewelled cap, were more fashionable.

In either case, the bodice should be flat, allowing no curve for the breasts but pushing them up above the neck. Uncomfortable as heck, which is why I only play peasant.


I think they wanted the Tudor look for marketing reasons. Among the images of the real Barbara I submitted are these two:

Image

Image

I would have loved to have had her dressed as in the first picture, with the high collar and the jaunty little tilted cap. I can see what you mean about the the longer skirt as well. On the other hand, in the engraving she is wearing a square neckline and a French hood. It's odd to see her in two such different styles, separated by thirty years or so. She's identified as "Herzogin von Ferrara" in the engraving so it must have been done after she married Alfonso. I've wondered if it was kind of a stock engraving with her name added. Heh. It certainly doesn't particularly look like her, or at least like the woman in the full-length painting.

Well, as you say, it's pretty and hopefully most people won't be put off by the style. I am muchly impressed by the depth and detail of your knowledge! :)
THE RED LILY CROWN: A Novel of Medici Florence.
THE FLOWER READER.
THE SECOND DUCHESS.

www.elizabethloupas.com


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