Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Rebecca Gablé

User avatar
Ariadne
Bibliophile
Location: At the foothills of Mt. Level

Postby Ariadne » Mon November 12th, 2012, 10:50 pm

"Gabriele Campbell" wrote:Though not all those German historical fiction books are good. There is a whole bunch that should rather belong in the Romance section - more like characters in costumes, girls dressed up as boys, midwives accused of withcraft several times over (it's a 6 book series by now and judging from the cover blurb the 6th version of book 1 ;) ) and this nonsense about female popes. Somehow the Middle Ages are Germany's Scottish laird with his claymore and the feisty Sassenach lass right now. :D


OK, maybe I won't feel so bad then that I can't read them! I did notice that an awful lot of them dealt with midwives and/or witchcraft.

Anka Sawas
Newbie

Postby Anka Sawas » Wed December 5th, 2012, 5:22 pm

"Ariadne" wrote:OK, maybe I won't feel so bad then that I can't read them! I did notice that an awful lot of them dealt with midwives and/or witchcraft.



Might be, that some German books are like that, but please believe me, Rebecca Gablé is better than that, if not the best German author for historical fiction. I can say: she is a very talented author and pretty detailed in historical facts. As somebody who'd read (and re-read) her books I am looking forward to the first English book of her Waringham-series (Spring 2013).

Although, there is already one book available in English ("The Settlers of Catan"), this is actual - let's say - not her best book. It's true fiction, so no historical facts and backgrounds. It was intended as a story to the game "The Settlers of Catan". For a fan, it might be a nice read for waiting time between books, but not necessarily something to start with. I very much recommend to start with her Waringham-series next year.

User avatar
Ariadne
Bibliophile
Location: At the foothills of Mt. Level

Postby Ariadne » Wed December 5th, 2012, 6:23 pm

"Anka Sawas" wrote:Might be, that some German books are like that, but please believe me, Rebecca Gablé is better than that, if not the best German author for historical fiction. I can say: she is a very talented author and pretty detailed in historical facts. As somebody who'd read (and re-read) her books I am looking forward to the first English book of her Waringham-series (Spring 2013).

Although, there is already one book available in English ("The Settlers of Catan"), this is actual - let's say - not her best book. It's true fiction, so no historical facts and backgrounds. It was intended as a story to the game "The Settlers of Catan". For a fan, it might be a nice read for waiting time between books, but not necessarily something to start with. I very much recommend to start with her Waringham-series next year.


Thanks for the information - I'm looking forward to her first Waringham novel, too! I've already read and reviewed Settlers of Catan and, while I agree it's not your usual historical fiction, it doesn't quite fit as fantasy, either. I was pleased that no familiarity with the game was necessary in order to read it.

User avatar
Ariadne
Bibliophile
Location: At the foothills of Mt. Level

Postby Ariadne » Wed December 5th, 2012, 6:28 pm

Also, I remember seeing her announcement of a spring 2013 pub date, but it's not listed on Amazon yet.

User avatar
Gabriele Campbell
Reader
Location: Germany
Contact:

Postby Gabriele Campbell » Wed December 5th, 2012, 9:27 pm

"Anka Sawas" wrote:Might be, that some German books are like that, but please believe me, Rebecca Gablé is better than that, if not the best German author for historical fiction. I can say: she is a very talented author and pretty detailed in historical facts. As somebody who'd read (and re-read) her books I am looking forward to the first English book of her Waringham-series (Spring 2013).


I agree, Gablé is a different league from Iny Lorentz (She of the Girls Disguised as Men :) ) and whoever wrote that horrible Midwife trash or the novel about the female pope, and so is Iris Kammerer (who wrote some pretty decent books about the Romans). But overall, the German hist fic heaven has some nasty black holes among the sparkly stars. ;)

User avatar
Rissa
Scribbler
Location: Germany

Postby Rissa » Tue September 24th, 2013, 4:06 pm

There are news on an English release.
On her homepage Rebecca Gablé now says that her first historical novel, Das Lächeln der Fortuna, is now named Fortune’s Wheel and will be released as a three part ebook, sstarting in February 2014. It might be released as print book later, but so far there isn't a date for that.
She also mentions that her other Waringham novels might be translated, but nothing is fixed yet.

That's very different to what she said some years ago, but at least there are some news.

User avatar
EC2
Bibliomaniac
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Postby EC2 » Tue September 24th, 2013, 4:53 pm

It's interesting too how many English speaking authors are translated into German for their HF market but not the other way around.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

User avatar
Kveto from Prague
Compulsive Reader
Location: Prague, Bohemia

Postby Kveto from Prague » Tue September 24th, 2013, 7:51 pm

Hi EC,
I know that in central Europe there is a certain bias in favour of translated books from foreign authors. I guess the reasoning is that if they went to all the effort of translating the book then it must be good. On my journey to work by tube, I'll see lots of adds for various foreign authors translations(Jo Nesbo the Norwegian author seems popular recently) but rarely if ever a Czech author like Milan Kundera.

A female Czech writer I know who write patiches of Conan books was asked to used an Anglo-Saxon pen name because it is believed to increase sales if it appears the book was translated from English. So you have a book written in Czech by a Czech author going by the name of, say, Joe Smith. kind of funny when you think about it.


Return to “By Author”