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M M Kaye

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LCW
Compulsive Reader
Location: Southern California

Postby LCW » Thu December 4th, 2008, 5:29 pm

OK so I finished TFP and I have to say the book got so much better...pretty much right after I posted. I was riveted by the suttee scene and all the events surrounding it. The last 150 pages about the Second Afghan Campaign seemed like they should've been part of another novel. They just seemed slapped on the last part of the novel for no reason. She should've added them much much earlier in the novel and adjusted the timeline of her ficitonal story accordingly. I know it's a faux pau for readers to make comments like that but I just couldn't help myself, it's all I could think about while reading it. But I looved the ending! So all in all it's a 4 star novel for me! No if I could just get, as someone here once so geniously put it, my "review mojo" back, lol!!
Books to the ceiling,
Books to the sky,
My pile of books is a mile high.
How I love them! How I need them!
I'll have a long beard by the time I read them. --Arnold Lobel

Caveowl
Scribbler

Open Note to Misfit

Postby Caveowl » Fri December 5th, 2008, 8:45 am

re "Trade Wind."* The book was an enriching history lesson, but I skimmed at an increasing rate in the second half.* It would interest me to know how Kaye worked, or not, with editors.The specific scene involving Hero and Rory seemed possible, but improbable.* I chose not to read the Amazon reviews, but I'm confident of the scene to which you refer. To me, Rory's acts of revenge were not congruent with the book's ending.* For the sake of those who haven't yet read "Trade Wind," I'll say not much more; however, the concept, and vast sales, of the "Bodice Ripper" genre isn't a phenomenon that I comprehend.* Could "Trade Wind" be fairly described to have an element of that genre?That said, next, after re-reading a Robert Goddard LP, "Into the Blue," I'll try "Far Pavillions" in regular print.* (Interesting to google "suttee scene.")Re LP: Having had cataract surgeries, and then another surgery for recurrent corneal erosion, I tend to give up on regular print much more quickly than LP books.

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Fri December 5th, 2008, 1:48 pm

"LCW" wrote:. I know it's a faux pau for readers to make comments like that but I just couldn't help myself, it's all I could think about while reading it. !


Why a faux pas? We are discussing a book and in the discussion I'd expect people to say what they didn't like. I think you have a very good point, actually. But glad you ultimately liked it - and yes that suttree scene was amazing.

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Fri December 5th, 2008, 2:49 pm

Could "Trade Wind" be fairly described to have an element of that genre?


I really wouldn't see it that way. What maddened me is the way some reviewers carried on and I'm like how many soap opera bad guys started out doing that very same thing and they get turned into the next super hero and marry the woman. Nobody has a problem with that though......

Re LP: Having had cataract surgeries, and then another surgery for recurrent corneal erosion, I tend to give up on regular print much more quickly than LP books.


I think it's great that these books are availalbe. I'd never known that until I accidentally took one out from the library. :)

User avatar
LCW
Compulsive Reader
Location: Southern California

Postby LCW » Fri December 5th, 2008, 6:35 pm

"Ash" wrote:Why a faux pas? We are discussing a book and in the discussion I'd expect people to say what they didn't like. I think you have a very good point, actually. But glad you ultimately liked it - and yes that suttree scene was amazing.


I"ve read in various places that readers should review an author's work based on what they actually wrote, not the way the reader wished they wrote it. I try to do that but I couln't help thinking she should've rearranged some things in TFP.
Books to the ceiling,

Books to the sky,

My pile of books is a mile high.

How I love them! How I need them!

I'll have a long beard by the time I read them. --Arnold Lobel

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Sat December 6th, 2008, 3:51 am

I understand - but there are many times when its obvious what the author needed to do to make the story better. I don't think there's anything wrong at bringing that up. But then I don't think there should be much restriction on how a reader critiques a book, esp for a informal discussion.

User avatar
LCW
Compulsive Reader
Location: Southern California

Postby LCW » Sat December 6th, 2008, 5:50 am

Yes, I agree! And that's a good point about informal discussions!!
Books to the ceiling,

Books to the sky,

My pile of books is a mile high.

How I love them! How I need them!

I'll have a long beard by the time I read them. --Arnold Lobel

User avatar
diamondlil
Bibliomaniac

Postby diamondlil » Tue August 4th, 2009, 11:59 am

I bought a copy of Shadow of the Moon for $1 today! Yay!
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There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Tue August 4th, 2009, 1:57 pm

"diamondlil" wrote:I bought a copy of Shadow of the Moon for $1 today! Yay!


Good job. Watch out for those last 200 pages they're a killer (no sleep).
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be


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