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Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett

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EC2
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Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett

Postby EC2 » Wed September 3rd, 2008, 10:05 am

Wyrd sisters is more fantasy than historical but it does have plenty of historical elements. 'Witches are not by nature gregarious and they certainly don't have leaders. Granny Weatherwax was the most highly regarded of the leaders they didn't have. But even she found that meddling in royal politics was a lot more difficult than certain playwrights would have you believe.'

It's a skit on Macbeth, but with lots of serious layers amid the humour. But why I've mentioned it on forum is that there's an interesting quote re history at one point in the book

: '....the past is what people remember, and memories are words. Who knows how a king behaved a thousand years ago? There is only recollection and stories. And plays, of course.'
......'You tell me history is what people are told?' said the duchess.
The fool looked around the throne room and found King Gruneberry the Good (906-967). 'Was he?' he said, pointing. 'Who knows now?' What was he good at? But he will be Gruneberry the Good until the end of the world.'

Spot on...
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diamondlil
Bibliomaniac

Postby diamondlil » Wed September 3rd, 2008, 10:09 am

I love the hidden gems that are sprinkled thoughout Pratchett's books. I haven't read this one yet though.
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Postby Carla » Wed September 3rd, 2008, 3:26 pm

Oh, that's one of my favourites! I think it may have been the first Discworld novel I read. It's those sharp observations among the jokes that make Pratchett such a joy. I reckon he's going to be regarded as a classic author in the fullness of time, up there with Dickens and the like.
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annis
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Postby annis » Thu September 4th, 2008, 4:25 am

Terry Pratchett is in a class of his own -as you say he's both very wise and bitingly sharp as well as being extremely funny. He also makes the idea of magic seem perfectly believable.
The witches are probably my favorites, though as a librarian of course I have a soft spot for the Librarian and love the concept of L-space
DEATH is a wonderful creation as well, and I really enjoyed the superannuated barbarians in 'Interesting Times".
I believe movies have been made of "The Colour of Magic" and "Hogfather", though I haven't seen either of them.

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Leyland
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Pratchett 101

Postby Leyland » Thu October 23rd, 2008, 3:33 pm

So, where does a reader start with Pratchett? Are his books a series that should be started and read in order? I'm referring to Discworld, I think. I've not been sure what to buy first whenever I look his many works up on Amazon, so I haven't got anything yet.
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EC2
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Postby EC2 » Thu October 23rd, 2008, 3:54 pm

"Leyland" wrote:So, where does a reader start with Pratchett? Are his books a series that should be started and read in order? I'm referring to Discworld, I think. I've not been sure what to buy first whenever I look his many works up on Amazon, so I haven't got anything yet.


I haven't read them all and it's difficult for me to say because I've read them out of sequence. I think the first one is The Colour of Magic. Guards Guards! is fairly stand alone. Wyrd Sisters (a skit on Macbeth) and Witches Abroad are loosely 1 and 2 of that element of the Discworld stories, but you don't need to read in sequence. Mort is fairly stand alone - I've just read that one. The only thing you need to know when setting out is THAT DEATH ALWAYS SPEAKS IN CAPITAL LETTERS when he appears as a character!
I've just found my copy of Guards! Guards! which is dedicated by Pratchett
to
'They may be called the Palace Guard, the City Guard, or the Patrol. Whatever their name, their purpose in any work of heroic fantasy is identical: it is round about Chapter Three (or ten minutes into the film) to rush into the room, attack the hero one at a time, and be slaughtered. No one ever asks them if they wanted to. This book is dedicated to those fine men.'

There's a wonderful quote in the book about second hand bookshops that every reader should remember:
'Even big collections of ordinary books distort space, as can readily be proven by anyone who has been around a really old-fashioned secondhand bookshop, one of those that look as thought they were designed by M. Escher on a bad day and has more staircases than storeys and those rows of shelves which end in little doors that are surely too small for a full-sized human to enter. The relevant equation is: Knowledge=power=energy=matter=mass; a good bookshop is just a genteel Black Hole that knows how to read.'

Wonderful stuff!
Les proz e les vassals

Souvent entre piez de chevals

Kar ja li coard n’I chasront



'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'


Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal



www.elizabethchadwick.com

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Carine
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Postby Carine » Thu October 23rd, 2008, 4:46 pm

"Leyland" wrote:So, where does a reader start with Pratchett? Are his books a series that should be started and read in order? I'm referring to Discworld, I think. I've not been sure what to buy first whenever I look his many works up on Amazon, so I haven't got anything yet.


This is a link to his page on fantasticfiction.co.uk, maybe it can help Leyland, at least the order in which he wrote them is there.

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Postby Ash » Fri October 24th, 2008, 2:07 am

Here's a better one:

http://www.lspace.org/books/reading-order-guides/the-discworld-reading-order-guide-1-5.jpg

Its a flow chart. You decide which type of books you want (witches, guards, wizards etc) and start from the first listed, then move on from there. Personally my suggestions for beginners are Small Gods, Soul Music, Mort, and Wyrd Sisters. The ones earlier tend to be a little too light (tho are still very good) the ones after them require a little more background.

annis
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Postby annis » Fri October 24th, 2008, 5:02 am

Wyrd Sisters are my favourites-- love those witches. You certainly wouldn't want to cross Granny Weatherwax the wrong way! I have high hopes for young Tiffany Aching as well.

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EC2
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Postby EC2 » Fri October 24th, 2008, 9:56 am

"annis" wrote:Wyrd Sisters are my favourites-- love those witches. You certainly wouldn't want to cross Granny Weatherwax the wrong way! I have high hopes for young Tiffany Aching as well.


My best friend has been loving Wyrd Sisters (her first Pratchett). I'm buying her Mort for Christmas.
Les proz e les vassals

Souvent entre piez de chevals

Kar ja li coard n’I chasront



'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'


Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal



www.elizabethchadwick.com


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