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Storytelling 2.0

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.
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diamondlil
Bibliomaniac

Storytelling 2.0

Postby diamondlil » Mon September 1st, 2008, 9:05 am

I saw this over at Publisher's Weekly and thought that some here might find it interesting.

Dutton has laid out big money for what it's dubbing a "digi-novel" by the creator of the C.S.I. television franchise. The Penguin imprint paid millions for a multimedia three-book series from Anthony Zuiker that, at its centerpiece, features a mystery novel which will send readers to a Web site with companion footage relating to the plot.

Zuiker's chapters will close with codes that readers can use online to unlock "motion picture footage" that continues the storyline from the book.


You can read the full story here.

So what do you think? Is this the book of the future?
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Divia
Bibliomaniac
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Postby Divia » Mon September 1st, 2008, 2:16 pm

For some I think it will be great. For me I just want to read my novel. Then maybe I want to go to the author's website where they may have additional information such as books they used, photos of the famous people etc.

I think my students maybe interestedin this sort of thing though. Hmm Maybe its a generational gap.
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Margaret
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: I can't answer this in 100 characters. Sorry.
Favorite HF book: Checkmate, the final novel in the Lymond series
Preferred HF: Literary novels. Late medieval and Renaissance.
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Postby Margaret » Mon September 1st, 2008, 6:41 pm

The whole idea makes me feel exhausted. I want the story and the characters to be interesting enough to carry the reading experience on their own, without my having to click on a bunch of distracting options. I can see how this might appeal to people who have grown up with computers and want a more interactive experience - but could it compete with the completely interactive experience of a video-game?
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User avatar
Divia
Bibliomaniac
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Postby Divia » Mon September 1st, 2008, 6:52 pm

I think if students had a choice they would rather play video games than read a book.

However, I can see how this might appeal to readers, younger and male ones. Males are so visual anyway. They like to look at stuff and this may help bridge the gap and get people who wouldnt normally read to give it a go.

But I agree with you the thought itself is exhausting and something I really wouldnt want to do.
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.

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