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Blood of Flowers by Anita Amirrezvani

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Wed October 22nd, 2008, 8:10 pm

"Carla" wrote: I found the ending excessively abrupt, so much so that at first I thought there must be some pages missing. Having seen the narrator grow up and take control of her own life, I would have liked to know what she did with it, .


I agree. The folk tale at the end also baffled me as well,tho I did detect a positive ending (tho that might just be my own wishful thinking). Then again, I have ranted before about unneeded epilogues and things wrapped up too much. But it could have been a little. This book is going to be discussed by my book group in a few months; it will be interesting to see their take on it.

BTW Carla I liked your discription of transparent writing. Books like this, I don't even feel as if I am reading, I feel like I am watching a movie right on the page. Like that term.

Carla
Compulsive Reader
Contact:

Postby Carla » Thu October 23rd, 2008, 8:42 am

I'm glad it wasn't just me that was baffled by the ending! If anyone works it out, please explain it to me :-)

Misfit - I see what you mean about the narrator's selfish choices. I didn't hold them too much against her, because she's only 15 or 16 through most of the story, and hasn't really had to grow up yet. Another reason why I would have quite liked to see more of her when she'd matured a bit.

Ash - Yes, I like writing like that too. It's hard to do.
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords
Website: http://www.carlanayland.org
Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Thu October 23rd, 2008, 1:49 pm

I also didn't blame her for those 'decisions' because its not like she had a lot of options in that time period. I blamed her uncle more than anyone, because he could have protected her from his monstrous wife if he had the cojones. But then if he did, it would have been a different story...

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Thu October 23rd, 2008, 1:54 pm

"Ash" wrote:I also didn't blame her for those 'decisions' because its not like she had a lot of options in that time period. I blamed her uncle more than anyone, because he could have protected her from his monstrous wife if he had the cojones. But then if he did, it would have been a different story...



Good point :)

I didn't hold them too much against her, because she's only 15 or 16 through most of the story, and hasn't really had to grow up yet.


But weren't they much more grown up at 15 or 16 in those days then they are now? Who knows?

I think if I'd had a more satisfying ending and redeemed her character somewhat I could have forgiven a lot of that selfishness.

Carla
Compulsive Reader
Contact:

Postby Carla » Sun October 26th, 2008, 11:21 am

"Ash" wrote:I also didn't blame her for those 'decisions' because its not like she had a lot of options in that time period. I blamed her uncle more than anyone, because he could have protected her from his monstrous wife if he had the cojones. But then if he did, it would have been a different story...


You could say he did, in the end, when he told his wife to shut up and gave the narrator the money to pay the creepy butcher. I wonder if he would have ended the sigheh if the narrator had asked him to. She assumed he wouldn't, so she did it herself (in about the worst possible way - no wonder he was furious with her! Using his seal without his permission is like stealing his good name. What was she thinking of?). But was she correct to assume he would have forced her to continue with it? I do wonder if he was quite as weak as she thought him.

But as you say, that would have been a different story!
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria

Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009

Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords

Website: http://www.carlanayland.org

Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com


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