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What are you reading?

Retired Threads
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diamondlil
Bibliomaniac

Postby diamondlil » Mon November 24th, 2008, 9:32 am

I am reading Purity in Death by J D Robb.
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There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

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pat
Avid Reader
Location: Adelaide, South Australia

Postby pat » Mon November 24th, 2008, 11:39 am

This weekend I started The Love Knot by Elizabeth Chadwick.
A good book and a good coffee, what more can anyone want? xx

LoisAnn
Reader
Location: Marlow, Oklahoma

Postby LoisAnn » Mon November 24th, 2008, 6:07 pm

"pat" wrote:This weekend I started The Love Knot by Elizabeth Chadwick.


Oh, Boy ... looking at your "tagline" quote, my best advice is to settle in with a big cup of coffee, a quiet corner & lots of time!!
I've never known any trouble that an hour's reading didn't assuage. ~ Charles de Secondat

LoisAnn
Reader
Location: Marlow, Oklahoma

Postby LoisAnn » Mon November 24th, 2008, 6:21 pm

"SonjaMarie" wrote:Is that about Matilda? I tried to look it up but it came out in 1980 and the cheapest one is a little under $100!

SM


Fitzempress' Law is set in the 20th year of Henry II's reign; specifically at the time when the Young King rebelled against his father. The main thrust of the story is about three teen-agers (in current time) who have had a motorcycle accident and, while in comas in the hospital, are transported back to Henry II's England.

What makes this such an intriguing plot is that the three teen-agers (two boys & one girl) are all aware of what has happened to them and therefore, can give us a glimpse of medieval England from a modern perspective. One boy ends up as Aluric, a pig-herder from a small village; the girl becomes Hawise, a knight's daughter whose marriage contract fell apart and is now being forced into a convent and the other boy becomes Sir Rodger, a knight on the tourney circuit.

In their new lives, they each need assistance from the legal system - such as it was in Henry II's England - and thus, the title. I'm not far enough into it to comment much more ... and I sure don't want to give anything away. Suffice to say, I'm enjoying it very much and am sure it will only get better as I read more of it ...
I've never known any trouble that an hour's reading didn't assuage. ~ Charles de Secondat

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SonjaMarie
Bibliomaniac
Location: Vashon, WA
Contact:

Postby SonjaMarie » Mon November 24th, 2008, 6:28 pm

Thanks Lois! Even if I was remotely interested in reading it, I couldn't afford the outrageous prices sellers are asking for! How did you get so lucky to get a copy or did you pay a crazy price for it?

SM
Last edited by SonjaMarie on Mon November 24th, 2008, 7:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Mon November 24th, 2008, 7:10 pm

"Fitzempress' Law" is very good and very expensive- no-one wants to part with their old copy! It's definitely a library interloaner.

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Margaret
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: I can't answer this in 100 characters. Sorry.
Favorite HF book: Checkmate, the final novel in the Lymond series
Preferred HF: Literary novels. Late medieval and Renaissance.
Location: Catskill, New York, USA
Contact:

Postby Margaret » Mon November 24th, 2008, 8:56 pm

Just started reading our own C.W. Gortner's The Last Queen, and am enjoying it. I'm intrigued by how Chris brings his characters to life for me, having just read a novel with an equal amount of physical description of the characters, but in which I never really "saw" them in my mind's eye. I think it may be that the people in The Last Queen are viewed in motion more than they were in the other novel, where the descriptions tended to be more static.
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings (probably well over 5000 by now, but I haven't re-counted lately) and over 700 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

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Amanda
Compulsive Reader
Location: Sydney, Australia

Postby Amanda » Mon November 24th, 2008, 9:27 pm

I'm reading The Queen's Sorrow by Susannah Dunn. I am about half way through and I like this more than her previous book about Katherine Parr. Although so far there hasn;t been all that much about Mary I. It is through the eyes of a member of the Spanish entourage, and that has been quite good.

I'd love to get my hands on a copy of Fitzempress Law! BUt thus far, I haven't even been able to track down a library copy!

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pat
Avid Reader
Location: Adelaide, South Australia

Postby pat » Tue November 25th, 2008, 3:25 am

"LoisAnn" wrote:Oh, Boy ... looking at your "tagline" quote, my best advice is to settle in with a big cup of coffee, a quiet corner & lots of time!!


What more could we want? Maybe a cookie or two for energy!
A good book and a good coffee, what more can anyone want? xx

User avatar
nona
Bibliophile
Location: Oklahoma

Postby nona » Tue November 25th, 2008, 3:57 am

decided on The Rose of York:Love & War by kathleen Winsor


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