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What are you reading?

Retired Threads
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Leyland
Bibliophile
Location: Travelers Rest SC

Postby Leyland » Tue October 28th, 2008, 3:05 pm

"Ash" wrote:Now reading Edgar Sawtelle, not HF, but a book many have recommended to me. The fact that the protaganist is unable to speak, and communicates in sign language, has certainly increased my interest.

My mother just finished it and loved it. She has said several times she wished it hadn't ended and doesn't want to read anything at the moment because she knows she doesn't have a book in her TBR right now that can compare to how great a read Sawtelle was for her.

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pat
Avid Reader
Location: Adelaide, South Australia

Postby pat » Wed October 29th, 2008, 1:32 am

The Heretic Queen, by MM
A good book and a good coffee, what more can anyone want? xx

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SonjaMarie
Bibliomaniac
Location: Vashon, WA
Contact:

Postby SonjaMarie » Wed October 29th, 2008, 7:11 am

I've finished "The Affair of the Poisons" by Frances Mossiker (written 1969), a very readable account of the Poisons Affair that haunted the court of Louis XIV in the late 1600s. There is another book about the Affair written by Anne Somerset in 2004 that I wish to read someday to compare and contrast how different or the same two books on the same subject written 35 years apart are.

SM
The Lady Jane Grey Internet Museum
My Booksfree Queue

Original Join Date: Mar 2006
Previous Amount of Posts: 2,517
Books Read In 2014: 109 - June: 17 (May: 17)
Full List Here: http://www.historicalfictiononline.com/forums/showthread.php?p=114965

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EC2
Bibliomaniac
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Postby EC2 » Wed October 29th, 2008, 3:06 pm

Just this minute started Mistress of the Art of Death by Arianna Franklin. Extremely like a copy of the Canterbury Tales prologue at the moment. Just at the intro to Henry II and his exchequer at Dover. Did they play billiards then with green baize boards? I suspect I am going to be struggling with the historical veracity of detail on this one - but then I know the period. If it was written in a different century, I'd probably not keep being yanked out of the story. Once it gets going I might become absorbed enough not to notice. We shall see.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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Spitfire
Reader
Location: Canada

Postby Spitfire » Wed October 29th, 2008, 3:49 pm

Started my first Pennman novel, Here Be Dragons...only read one chapter so far...but what an incredible start!
Only the pure of heart can make good soup. - Beethoven

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EC2
Bibliomaniac
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Postby EC2 » Wed October 29th, 2008, 3:54 pm

"Spitfire" wrote:Started my first Pennman novel, Here Be Dragons...only read one chapter so far...but what an incredible start!


You're in for a treat Spitfire. IMO it's her best one!
Les proz e les vassals

Souvent entre piez de chevals

Kar ja li coard n’I chasront



'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'


Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal



www.elizabethchadwick.com

Carla
Compulsive Reader
Contact:

Postby Carla » Wed October 29th, 2008, 4:56 pm

Just finished The Crimson Portrait by Jody Shields.
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords
Website: http://www.carlanayland.org
Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com

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amyb
Reader
Location: Atlanta, GA
Contact:

Postby amyb » Wed October 29th, 2008, 4:59 pm

Just started a book sent to me by Sourcebooks for review: The Lady flees her Lord by Michele Ann Young. Cheesy cover, but seems good so far!

Carla
Compulsive Reader
Contact:

Postby Carla » Wed October 29th, 2008, 4:59 pm

"EC2" wrote:Just this minute started Mistress of the Art of Death by Arianna Franklin. Extremely like a copy of the Canterbury Tales prologue at the moment. Just at the intro to Henry II and his exchequer at Dover. Did they play billiards then with green baize boards? I suspect I am going to be struggling with the historical veracity of detail on this one - but then I know the period. If it was written in a different century, I'd probably not keep being yanked out of the story. Once it gets going I might become absorbed enough not to notice. We shall see.


Wikipedia says billiards was invented in the 15th century. Maybe the author knows different.
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria

Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009

Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords

Website: http://www.carlanayland.org

Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Wed October 29th, 2008, 6:45 pm

Carla's right. Although there was an outdoor form of the game known as ground billiards played in Europe in the thirteenth/fourteenth centuries (still too early by a century or so for MOTATD), the first recorded instances of an indoor version date from the fifteenth century (the green cover is supposed to represent the grass of the outdoor version).

Diana Norman has spent a lot of time in the twelfth century (her earliest novels "Fitzempress' Law" and "King of the Last Days" are set in that period) so it's a bit surprising that she'd get it wrong.


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