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What are you reading?

Retired Threads
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Divia
Bibliomaniac
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Postby Divia » Sat September 13th, 2008, 12:37 pm

Oh, tell me how that is! I have it in my Amazon wish list after seeing it at B&N, but havent bought it yet. Its a reissue and from the 70s? right? Ive found that I dislike HF written back in the day.
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

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nona
Bibliophile
Location: Oklahoma

Postby nona » Sat September 13th, 2008, 2:10 pm

last night we went on a date and of course afterwards we went shopping and ended at Walmart get a few things for the house, in the book isle they had a clearence section I bought Amanda Scott's Border Lass for $1, it sounds cute, young welsh border girl knows a secret and strong gallant knight,who happens to be English, saves the day.

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Telynor
Bibliophile
Location: On the Banks of the Hudson

Postby Telynor » Sat September 13th, 2008, 11:04 pm

Finished Ann Rule's Too Late to Say Goodbye and a very chilling book it is too. I think that something light and frothy is in order for the next read.

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Sun September 14th, 2008, 12:18 am

"Telynor" wrote:Finished Ann Rule's Too Late to Say Goodbye and a very chilling book it is too. I think that something light and frothy is in order for the next read.


I'm not reading true crime anymore but Ann Rule is the queen of the genre. And a local gal, from Des Moines, WA. Going OT but one of the creepiest stories she's ever told on the local talk shows is after Ridgway (the Green River Killer) was arrested. It was common knowledge for years that if and when that person was arrested she'd write a book. Anyway, after the arrest her daughter recognized Ridgway as someone who was hanging out at one of her book signings.

Back to topic, The Proud Breed by Celeste De Blasis. A big, fat multi-generational saga set in old California. I'm loving it so far.

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lindymc
Reader

Postby lindymc » Sun September 14th, 2008, 12:31 am

Just finished Sword Song, book 4 of Cornwell's Saxon series. Read all four books, one right after another. Decided I need a break from old England so started Bull's Island by Dorothea Benton Frank, southern chick lit that is a cut above the usual.

But I have to say, Cornwell's books were wonderful!

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Sun September 14th, 2008, 1:18 am

Now reading Stronghold and Shadows, along with an interesting looking book: A Bookshelf of Our Own: works that changed women's lives by Deborah Felder. There looks to be a lot of history in these essays, as well as literary criticsm.

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Sun September 14th, 2008, 1:54 am

"lindymc" wrote: so started Bull's Island by Dorothea Benton Frank, southern chick lit that is a cut above the usual.


Thanks for reminding me. I haven't read her book in a couple of years. Her low country books are wonderful.

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Divia
Bibliomaniac
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Postby Divia » Sun September 14th, 2008, 3:42 am

I just started reading "Bonds of Community: The lives of Fram Women in Nineteenth Century new York"

I hope it helps me with my novel :)
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.

http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

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LCW
Compulsive Reader
Location: Southern California

Postby LCW » Sun September 14th, 2008, 4:43 am

I'm reading The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. It's really much better than I expected. I was iffy on the format initially but it being written in the form of letters actually gives the novel a sort of voyeuristic quality. My inner nosey busybody is loving it! ;)
Books to the ceiling,
Books to the sky,
My pile of books is a mile high.
How I love them! How I need them!
I'll have a long beard by the time I read them. --Arnold Lobel

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diamondlil
Bibliomaniac

Postby diamondlil » Sun September 14th, 2008, 4:50 am

I have only seen one review where someone didn't like it. Glad that you are enjoying it.
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