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What are you reading?

Retired Threads
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Alaric
Avid Reader
Location: Adelaide, Australia.
Contact:

Postby Alaric » Fri December 26th, 2008, 5:54 am

"On the Edge," by Richard Hammond

Autobiography by one of the three presenters of Top Gear.

gyrehead
Reader

Postby gyrehead » Fri December 26th, 2008, 6:02 pm

"Kasthu" wrote:I received a copy of that earlier this week and I've been anxiously waiting to read it since August. How on earth did your coworker get ahold of an ARC (I had to write about five e-mails before I received mine)? And how did they know what you would like?


It's pretty much a joke in the office at how much I read. We could be going to a meeting in cross town traffic and I'll pull out a book. Travel together I bring several. Now I'm sort of the book guru (their words -- I think book pimp might be more accurate) to a few who like to read but seem to think it should be a closed deal before going in; they think reading a book that wasn't brilliant is a waste of time and feel cheated.

As to where it came from? I still haven't figured out who got it for me. That blasted secret part of the whole Secret Santa ;) . Though it narrows it down considerably as I know of only about a half dozen who are huge Raybourn fans. I was reading the book during a convention half the office attended and it surprised many that a guy was reading something so "girlie". Since I'm pretty arrogant it didn't bother me in the least. However I would never have brought it let alone let myself be seen reading it if I knew that it would lead to constant questions about who writes just like Deanna. And what they should read next. Truly 'It is Hard Out Here' for a book pimp!

Got home from obligatory family doings and found Natasha Mostert's new book (arc in the mail) and might start that next since this weekend looks busy and I exerted tremendous will power and have Silent on the Moor nestled snuggly for Sunday when I get to sleep in and not have anyone to play host to or guest to at all!

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Telynor
Bibliophile
Location: On the Banks of the Hudson

Postby Telynor » Fri December 26th, 2008, 9:19 pm

Finished up The Far Pavilions, and surprisingly, read all of The Independence of Miss Mary Bennet in one night. Quite a surprise too.

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SonjaMarie
Bibliomaniac
Location: Vashon, WA
Contact:

Postby SonjaMarie » Fri December 26th, 2008, 9:20 pm

I've finished "The Medici Conspiracy The Illicit Journey of Looted Antiquities From Italy's Tomb Raiders to the World's Greatest Museums" by Peter Watson & Cecilia Todeschini.

This is a fascinating book, very easy to read and understand though does have a lot of information to take in. It's also very sad in that these tomb raiders, dealers, collectors, auction houses and museums, are all contributing to the rape of the history of the past. But with the publication of this book and trials of some of the biggest people who are doing this raping things seems to be changing for the better, at least one would hope so!

SM
The Lady Jane Grey Internet Museum
My Booksfree Queue

Original Join Date: Mar 2006
Previous Amount of Posts: 2,517
Books Read In 2014: 109 - June: 17 (May: 17)
Full List Here: http://www.historicalfictiononline.com/forums/showthread.php?p=114965

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Leyland
Bibliophile
Location: Travelers Rest SC

Postby Leyland » Sat December 27th, 2008, 12:35 am

I finished The Story of Edgar Sawtelle by David Wroblewski while on a family skiing vacation this past week. It was a very interesting story set in the early 70's and worth a read if you're in the mood for something different. Check it out from your local library. http://www.amazon.com/Story-Edgar-Sawtelle-Novel-Oprah/dp/0061768065/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1230337546&sr=1-1

I'm on page 124 of The Terror by Dan Simmons and am seriously enjoying this story set in 1845-47 during the British expedition to explore and chart the Northwest Passage.
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

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Carine
Compulsive Reader
Currently reading: Jonkvrouw - Jean-Claude Van Ryckeghem
Interest in HF: I love history
Favorite HF book: Can't pin that down to only 1 :-)
Preferred HF: Medieval, Tudor and Ancient Egyptian
Location: Ghent, Belgium
Contact:

Postby Carine » Sat December 27th, 2008, 9:53 am

Just started Crocodile on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters a few days ago.

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diamondlil
Bibliomaniac

Postby diamondlil » Sat December 27th, 2008, 10:17 am

I am currently reading the 12th book in that series Carine, called He Shall Thunder in the Sky.
My Blog - Reading Adventures

All things Historical Fiction - Historical Tapestry


There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

User avatar
Carine
Compulsive Reader
Currently reading: Jonkvrouw - Jean-Claude Van Ryckeghem
Interest in HF: I love history
Favorite HF book: Can't pin that down to only 1 :-)
Preferred HF: Medieval, Tudor and Ancient Egyptian
Location: Ghent, Belgium
Contact:

Postby Carine » Sat December 27th, 2008, 10:21 am

Oh great Diamondlil ! I'll certainly be interested how you like it.
I'm not very far into Crocodile yet, but so far so good.
There are quite a few books in this series I believe !

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diamondlil
Bibliomaniac

Postby diamondlil » Sat December 27th, 2008, 10:23 am

Yep! 18 at this point in time!

Amelia is a very lucky woman!
My Blog - Reading Adventures



All things Historical Fiction - Historical Tapestry





There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.



Edith Wharton

User avatar
AuntiePam
Reader

Postby AuntiePam » Sat December 27th, 2008, 4:30 pm

I just started Child 44 by Tom Rob Smith. It's set in the Soviet Union in 1953. The protagonist is in the Secret Service (Thought Police) and will be hunting a serial killer. His problem will be getting the government to admit the killer exists. Murders don't happen in a perfect society.


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