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What are you reading?

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SonjaMarie
Bibliomaniac
Location: Vashon, WA
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Postby SonjaMarie » Tue September 2nd, 2008, 5:12 pm

The various uses of cadavers?! Other then for learning/teaching? Or just that? I know they use them for those Body Works exhibitions and even that's just wrong to me!

I just finished "Summer Knight", the 4th book in the Dresden Files Series by Jim Butcher.

SM
The Lady Jane Grey Internet Museum
My Booksfree Queue

Original Join Date: Mar 2006
Previous Amount of Posts: 2,517
Books Read In 2014: 109 - June: 17 (May: 17)
Full List Here: http://www.historicalfictiononline.com/forums/showthread.php?p=114965

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ellenjane
Reader

Postby ellenjane » Tue September 2nd, 2008, 7:23 pm

Yes, it focuses on the different types of research that are done with cadavers, and the feelings of the researchers who use them. I don't think I care to speculate on any uses of cadavers beyond that!

It sounds like a very morbid book, but the writing style is very light and witty. (Weird, I know.) I don't think I'll be doing much further reading on the subject, but I'm enjoying it as a quick read. I've actually had it recommended to me by several people, so I'm glad to have a reason to pick it up. It was published in 2003, and there's still a hold list for it at my library - that's always a positive sign.

Stiff, by Mary Roach
Last edited by ellenjane on Tue September 2nd, 2008, 7:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: adding a thought

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EC2
Bibliomaniac
Location: Nottingham UK
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Postby EC2 » Tue September 2nd, 2008, 7:29 pm

Just finished Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett (wonderful!) Now starting The Apothecary's House by Adrian Matthews. - Puzzle about a painting seized during WWII and now everyone's after it. Not sure yet if it's historical or not, but it certainly has a lot of historical baggage.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall & The Corset by Laura Purcell (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Postby Vanessa » Tue September 2nd, 2008, 7:34 pm

I have The Apothecary's House on my TBR pile, EC. Let us know how you enjoy it.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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donroc
Compulsive Reader
Location: Winter Haven, Florida
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Postby donroc » Tue September 2nd, 2008, 8:27 pm

Many non-fiction works for researh, which prevents me from reading for pleasure. However, writing is a pleasur that trumps all.
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Bodo the Apostate, a novel set during the reign of Louis the Pious and end of the Carolingian Empire.

http://www.donaldmichaelplatt.com
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXZthhY6OtI&feature=channel_page

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donroc
Compulsive Reader
Location: Winter Haven, Florida
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Postby donroc » Tue September 2nd, 2008, 8:28 pm

But not making typos--- I NEVER misspell. :D
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Bodo the Apostate, a novel set during the reign of Louis the Pious and end of the Carolingian Empire.



http://www.donaldmichaelplatt.com

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXZthhY6OtI&feature=channel_page

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Tue September 2nd, 2008, 10:55 pm

I’m currently reading “King of Coins”, the sequel to “Knave of Swords”, by mysterious British author, Nicholas Carter. I say mysterious because I haven’t been able to find out anything about him. He wrote the two books I’ve mentioned plus a series about the English Civil War back in the late 1990s and then just disappeared from the scene.
I’m really enjoying the two I’ve read so far. They’re set in Renaissance Europe and are adventures featuring a motley group of soldiers, mixed English and Scottish, who were the warband of an English Marcher Lord until he lost them to a devious mercenary warlord in a card game.
They are led by a young English captain, James Eldritch , who’s an interesting character—morose, touchy, proud and quick-tempered . Before I read these stories I had the impression that he might be somewhat similar to Francis Crawford of Dorothy Dunnett’s “Lymond’ series, but he’s much more like Cecelia Holland’s mercenary knight Laeghaire in “The Firedrake”.

The complex machieavellian nature of Church and State politics and power play in the sixteenth century is the background to battles between France and the Holy Roman Empire, with the many small European states swinging wildly in allegiance as the balance of power shifts. The details of life as a mercenary soldier are fascinating. These guys were a law unto themselves- wild, ferocious and totally avaricious. If an employer didn’t pay them on time, they were known to start up negotiations with the opposing side in the middle of a battle! Even their clothing was different. To defiantly emphasize their place outside conventional limits they often wore unusual outfits, ripped, slashed and striped. For some reason in medieval and Renaissance times, striped clothing signified that the wearer was a social outsider. Maybe someone here knows why that was?
There’s an image of a typical Confederate mercenary in this 1517 painting by Niklaus Manuel. (He's the one holding the head!)
This piece from "What Great Paintings Say" is quite interesting.
Last edited by annis on Tue September 2nd, 2008, 10:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Wed September 3rd, 2008, 12:05 am

EC2, Wyred Sisters was probably my favorite of the early Practchett books. Have you read the other 'witch' once as well? They include Lords and Ladies, and Carpe Jungulum.

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Wed September 3rd, 2008, 1:34 am

Terry Pratchett's witches are wonderful! His series about about young witch Tiffany Aching make really good reading as well. They're technically YA, but don't let that put you off. The older witches make an appearance in these books as well. The feisty pictsies, the Nac Mac Feegles, are amongst TP's most endearing creations.
1) The Wee Free Men ,
2) A Hat Full of Sky
3) Wintersmith

Glad to see that I'm not the only queen of the typo, Donroc (though in your case that should read king)
You'll probably notice that I'm a serial editor- I always manage to find at least one typo in my post after I've submitted it- and yes, I do preview them first!
Last edited by annis on Wed September 3rd, 2008, 1:41 am, edited 1 time in total.

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EC2
Bibliomaniac
Location: Nottingham UK
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Postby EC2 » Wed September 3rd, 2008, 9:41 am

Ash and Annis, I have only read Witches Abroad of the others you mention, but said others are all in the house as my son collects Pratchett. Guards! Guards! probably remains my favourite. Terry Pratchett is a very wise man as well as being a funny one. I'm going to quote from Wyrd Sisters on the General Discussion in a moment.
P.S. I know that TP isn't a historical fiction author, but he definitely overlaps into the historical fantasy department (Wyrd Sisters involving Shakespeare, travelling players and Macbeth among its themes).
Les proz e les vassals

Souvent entre piez de chevals

Kar ja li coard n’I chasront



'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'


Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal



www.elizabethchadwick.com


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