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Book shopping today ...

Retired Threads
chuck
Bibliophile
Location: Ciinaminson NJ

Postby chuck » Tue December 30th, 2008, 9:05 pm

What can $2.43 buy? Happened upon a estate sale.....bought 4 books .....Carr's "The Alienist.....Chevalier's "The Lady and the Unicorn"...... Pearl's "The Dante Club"......and Penman's "the Queen's Man"....really on the cheap and I just could not pass them up.....I would have bought more but I already have most of them......Now where to stack them?......BTW they had all of Anne Rice's novels including her pseudonym...perused a couple of them....really quite smarmy.......

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Tue December 30th, 2008, 10:03 pm

Do you mean those erotic fantasy ones Anne Rice wrote as Anne Rampling, Chuck? They are quite hilariously OTT.

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ellenjane
Reader

Postby ellenjane » Tue December 30th, 2008, 10:24 pm

I got a couple of gift certificates for Christmas, so I've had a great time shopping online in the last couple of days. My mom gave me one to Amazon.uk specifically so I could pick up some of EC's books - I'm looking forward to reading the latest two and adding some headless women to my collection. From a different voucher, I also got the first three in Roberta Gellis' Rosalynde series, since my library doesn't carry them.

I'm saving the rest for when something strikes my fancy later in the year. (In truth, it will probably be gone within two weeks. But I'll be happy.)

chuck
Bibliophile
Location: Ciinaminson NJ

RAMPLING Xrated

Postby chuck » Tue December 30th, 2008, 11:15 pm

"annis" wrote:Do you mean those erotic fantasy ones Anne Rice wrote as Anne Rampling, Chuck? They are quite hilariously OTT.



Yes.....While reading/perusing... I wondered...was she was being serious or just tongue in cheek.....Now I know ......I actually enjoyed her "Mayfair Witches" and "Taltos",....but soon lost interest .....especially after "her book" went to film.....Tom and Brad as vampires..... Please.....Annis ....Happy New Year to you and your family.....Your post are so entertaining and informitive.....Cheers

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Kasthu
Compulsive Reader
Location: Radnor, PA
Contact:

Postby Kasthu » Wed December 31st, 2008, 12:33 am

"ellenjane" wrote: I'm looking forward to reading the latest two and adding some headless women to my collection.


LOL! I have quite a few of those in mine as well.

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Wed December 31st, 2008, 12:52 am

(In truth, it will probably be gone within two weeks. But I'll be happy.)


Isn't that the truth. Let us know what you think of the Roselynde books, the first three are definitely the best especially Alinor. Ian *sigh*.

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Wed December 31st, 2008, 2:25 am

Posted by Chuck
Happy New Year to you and your family.

And to you as well, Chuck- not long now- in fact here in NZ we only have 9 hours to go before we hit 2009!

I was thinking of you the other day when I was re-reading Shelagh Kelly's "Jorvik"- just checking to see if the elusve Erik Bloodaxe was there, but in fact it starts after his time, beginning with the St Brice's Day massacre of the Danes ordered by Ethelred (the Unready).
Far from ridding England of the Danes it brought down retribution from King Swein of Denmark, who was succeeded as King of England by his son, Cnut (Canute). Anyway, this is where you come in because a lot of the story is set during Cnut's reign and Cnut himself features frequently. Amongst other battles the main character, Sigurd, even gets to take part in the battle of 1030 led by Cnut when he invaded Norway and killed Olaf the Saint. Olaf's brother Harald Hardrada was wounded in the same battle, but managed to flee the country with a group of loyal warriors, marking the beginning of his Varangian adventures.

*Edit- I don't know if the Anne Rampling books are meant to be tongue-in-cheek, but it's hard to take them seriously :)
Last edited by annis on Wed December 31st, 2008, 2:34 am, edited 10 times in total.

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Amanda
Compulsive Reader
Location: Sydney, Australia

Postby Amanda » Wed December 31st, 2008, 5:40 am

In a bargain bin I found an interesting looking book today.

Consuming Passions: Leisure and Pleasure in Victorian Britain. by Judith Flanders.

The inside flyleaf starts as follows:

"Imagine a world where just one in ten people has a knife or a fork, where five out of six do not possess a cup. This was Britain in the early eighteenth century, yet by the close of the nineteenth century, lives were completely transformed, now centering around urban living, industrial employment, shopping and professional entertainment. The Industrial Revolution brought with it factories, railways, mines and machines. It also bought travel, department stores, leisure and pleasure."

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Susan
Bibliomaniac
Location: New Jersey, USA

Postby Susan » Wed December 31st, 2008, 1:16 pm

"Amanda" wrote:In a bargain bin I found an interesting looking book today.

Consuming Passions: Leisure and Pleasure in Victorian Britain. by Judith Flanders.

The inside flyleaf starts as follows:

"Imagine a world where just one in ten people has a knife or a fork, where five out of six do not possess a cup. This was Britain in the early eighteenth century, yet by the close of the nineteenth century, lives were completely transformed, now centering around urban living, industrial employment, shopping and professional entertainment. The Industrial Revolution brought with it factories, railways, mines and machines. It also bought travel, department stores, leisure and pleasure."


I have another interesting book by Judith Flanders called Inside the Victorian Home: A Portrait of Domestic Life in Victorian England.

It looks like Flanders has an interesting biography about Victorian sisters, A Circle of Sisters: Alice Kipling, Georgiana Burne Jones, Agnes Poynter, and Louisa Baldwin. Alice was the mother of Rudyard Kipling, Louisa was the mother of Stanley Baldwin, Agnes married Edward Poynter, administrator of the Royal Academy of Art and the National and Tate galleries, and Georgiana married artist Edward Burne-Jones.
~Susan~
~Unofficial Royalty~
Royal news updated daily, information and discussion about royalty past and present
http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/

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Leyland
Bibliophile
Location: Travelers Rest SC

Postby Leyland » Wed December 31st, 2008, 2:07 pm

"Amanda" wrote:Daughter of Lir by Diana Norman arrived on the doorstep today!


This sounds very interesting so I went to Amazon to look for an affordable copy - but a used paperback is listed for $217.95! That's got to be a mistake. Who would seriously pay that? The seller could at least offer free shipping instead of charging $3.99! :rolleyes:

5 others are available starting at $24.57. Hmmmm .... where did you order yours, Amanda?
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode


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