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'The Best of Anya'

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Leyland
Bibliophile
Location: Travelers Rest SC

'The Best of Anya'

Postby Leyland » Fri August 29th, 2008, 3:13 am

or, Anya's Greatest Hits. I believe most members here will agree with me that Katherine is at the top of the list and should not be missed in this lifetime!

My 'Best of Anya' follows with Green Darkness, The Turquoise, Avalon, Devil Water, and My Theodosia. I've read all her novels and have nearly all of them in my keeper library, except for Dragonwyck. That one just doesn't do it for me and I probably won't ever read it.

Like so many others here, Seton's Katherine got me seriously into HF. I read it in high school and have never looked back. Of course, there was less HF to choose from back in the 70's, if you don't count romance HF. HF has come a long way since then as we all can demonstrate with our massive TBR piles these days.

I'm sure each one of her books deserves its own thread and look forward to development of each one as we build this new forum.

So, who else has their own 'Best of' list?

Also, I posted this link on the old forum for anyone interested in Anya Seton's personal history:

http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/biography/mackethan.htm
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

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EC2
Bibliomaniac
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Postby EC2 » Fri August 29th, 2008, 3:51 am

Trust someone to be awkward.:rolleyes: Katherine for me actually comes in at number 3 behind Avalon and Green Darkness! Agree with you though that Anya Seton is a wonderful author. I've not read all of her works but have yet to find one that's disappointed. I can add Foxfire and The Turquoise to my list of have reads. Winthrop Woman, Devil Water and My Theodosia are still on the mental TBR.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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Leyland
Bibliophile
Location: Travelers Rest SC

Postby Leyland » Fri August 29th, 2008, 4:08 am

Sigh. You're forgiven, EC ;) .

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Fri August 29th, 2008, 2:01 pm

I'm picking Katherine, The Winthrop Woman, Avalon and Devil Water at the top. I really enjoyed Foxfire, but it might not appeal to all. It's been so long since Dragonwyck I can't say yea or nay.

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ellenjane
Reader

Postby ellenjane » Wed September 3rd, 2008, 5:41 pm

So far I've enjoyed Katherine and The Winthrop Woman, but was less keen on The Hearth and the Eagle or My Theodosia. Dragonwyck is somewhere in the middle, just for its Gothic-ness.

I'm glad to see that Devil Water is fairly well-liked. I picked that up for 33 cents at the Friends of the Library sale the other day!

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Spitfire
Reader
Location: Canada

Postby Spitfire » Fri September 5th, 2008, 10:43 pm

I am still fairly new to the Historical Fiction gendre (at least compared with most of you!) The only book of Anya Setton's I have read so far is Kathryn. Which I loved by the way. You couldn't help falling in love with the characters, feeling what they are feeling. I was thinking of picking up Dragonwyk next (purely for the cool sounding name) which book would you all recommend though, and why?
Only the pure of heart can make good soup. - Beethoven

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Leyland
Bibliophile
Location: Travelers Rest SC

Postby Leyland » Sat September 6th, 2008, 12:44 am

Green Darkness, Devil Water and Avalon would be good choices to follow Katherine.

Green Darkness contains several characters linked by reincarnation in two storylines set in the 1960’s and during the reign of the Tudors monarchs, Edward VI and Mary I. The Tudor storyline involves a young woman who recklessly and persistently falls in love with the wrong man as time, fortunes and events pass throughout the religious persecutions of Catholics and then Protestants. Resolutions to the past tragic events come about in the 1960’s.

Devil Water is primarily centered on the life and involvement of the Earl of Derwentwater and his daughter Jenny before and during the Jacobite rebellion of 1715. The settings are Northumberland, London, and the southern colonies of America. The multiple characters in these diverse locations are what I love most about the book. And the love story between Jenny and Rob is very nicely told.

Avalon is an adventurous 10th century tale of a young Cornish woman named Merewyn who proudly believes she is descended from King Arthur and gets caught up in a Viking raid. She learns a great deal more about her parentage afterwards, and begins a long journey to unknown lands. A love story between Merewyn and a knight named Rumon sets other events into motion.

I love the diversity of Seton’s stories and her wonderful characterization. The Winthrop Woman and The Turquoise are also well worth reading after the ones mentioned in the post.
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Sat September 6th, 2008, 12:51 am

"I love the diversity of Seton’s stories and her wonderful characterization."

Well said, I think that's one of the most refreshing things about her books. You're not always in the same century/country - it's always something different. Hearth and Eagle is definitely at the bottom along with Mistletoe and the Sword (first printed as YA in the 50'). Library books I'd call those two.

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Juniper
Scribbler
Interest in HF: I studied English Literature and History at college. Historical fiction blends my two passions together in one neat package.
Location: Missouri, USA
Contact:

Postby Juniper » Sat September 6th, 2008, 1:09 am

I'm not saying this just to be difficult, but I actually really liked Dragonwyck. It was the first Anya Seton book that I ever read, and it spurred me to read others. I admit that Katherine was a really good book though, but I'm not sure that I would say it was my favourite. Perhaps Avalon?

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diamondlil
Bibliomaniac

Postby diamondlil » Sat September 6th, 2008, 1:20 am

I quite liked Dragonwyck as well. I think I have a review somewhere.
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