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March 2009 - What are you reading?

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Misfit
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Location: Seattle, WA

Post by Misfit » Sat March 21st, 2009, 1:37 am

Secrets of the Tudor Court: The Pleasure Palace by Kate Emerson.

I'm about 50 pages into it and pleasantly surprised so far.
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

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nona
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Location: Oklahoma

Post by nona » Sat March 21st, 2009, 1:44 am

I keep picking that one up Misfit but I always put it back due to all the books on Tudor courts and all the seducing/intrigue.

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sat March 21st, 2009, 1:55 am

[quote=""nona""]I keep picking that one up Misfit but I always put it back due to all the books on Tudor courts and all the seducing/intrigue.[/quote]

I know what you mean and I'm as Tudor'ed out as the next, let alone some mediocre writing I've come across lately - which is why I'm quite surprised. Its even first person POV which I'm not fond of and still I'm enjoying it. I'm sure I'll be finished by Sunday at the latest so I'll check back in with a review then.
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

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Vanessa
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Posts: 4233
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Sat March 21st, 2009, 3:04 pm

I'm just about to start The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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LCW
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Joined: August 2008
Location: Southern California

Post by LCW » Sat March 21st, 2009, 5:25 pm

I'm about to start on The Master of Verona by David Blixt so I can participate in this month's discussion.
Books to the ceiling,
Books to the sky,
My pile of books is a mile high.
How I love them! How I need them!
I'll have a long beard by the time I read them. --Arnold Lobel

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Susan
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Location: New Jersey, USA

Post by Susan » Sat March 21st, 2009, 6:13 pm

Reading persuasive and explanatory essays written by my students instead of the current book I am reading, Mary Called Magdalene by Margaret George.
~Susan~
~Unofficial Royalty~
Royal news updated daily, information and discussion about royalty past and present
http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/

annis
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Post by annis » Sat March 21st, 2009, 7:48 pm

Have just started "The Street Philosopher", by Matthew Plampin. It looks promising- it's a novel about the Crimean War from the POV of a journalist sent out to cover it. ("Street Philosopher" was a nineteenth century term for a society writer/gossip columnist.) The Crimean War was possibly the first conflict to be the subject of media coverage. (I should probably say, the first on which media coverage had an influence)

There's an interview here with the author:
http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/intervi ... ew-plampin
Last edited by annis on Sat March 21st, 2009, 7:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Kasthu
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Location: Radnor, PA
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Post by Kasthu » Sat March 21st, 2009, 8:28 pm

It's not historical fiction, but I've just begun The Priory, by Mary Whipple.

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Ludmilla
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Location: Georgia USA

Post by Ludmilla » Sat March 21st, 2009, 10:14 pm

Just finished a YA historical, Fever 1793, by Laurie Halse Anderson, about the yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia. There were a few words that jumped out at me as modern lingo (e.g., did people really say 'huzzah' back then?), but it didn't bother me too much. Once the epidemic starts, the story becomes quite riveting. Now I'm reading another by her -- Chains, about a slave girl in NY who hopes to free herself from her current situation by spying for the Patriots in 1776. This one was a National Book Award Finalist.

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Kasthu
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Post by Kasthu » Sat March 21st, 2009, 10:24 pm

[quote=""Ludmilla""]Just finished a YA historical, Fever 1793, by Laurie Halse Anderson, about the yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia. There were a few words that jumped out at me as modern lingo (e.g., did people really say 'huzzah' back then?), but it didn't bother me too much. Once the epidemic starts, the story becomes quite riveting. Now I'm reading another by her -- Chains, about a slave girl in NY who hopes to free herself from her current situation by spying for the Patriots in 1776. This one was a National Book Award Finalist.[/quote]


According to the OED, "huzzah" was used as a sailor's cheer in the 17th and 18th century, as well as by the British infantry.

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