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March 2009 - The Master of Verona by David Blixt

A monthly discussion on varying themes guided by our members. (Book of the Month discussions through December 2011 can be found in this section too.)
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annis
Bibliomaniac
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Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Fri March 27th, 2009, 4:59 am

I loved this story right from the start- being thrown straight into the action was quite exhilarating, though as Margaret says, it does take a bit more reading to work out where that initial scene fits into the total story. I didn't find the Shakespearean references at all distracting; it was more like seeing an old acquaintance in the street and thinking, oh hey, there's old such-and-such- just a sense of familiarity. Though because I was so involved in the story I did miss a lot of them, and sometime I'd like to go back and read more carefully to see if I could pick up a few more. That said, I don't think it would affect the storyline if you didn't notice those references at all.

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LCW
Compulsive Reader
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Joined: August 2008
Location: Southern California

Post by LCW » Fri March 27th, 2009, 2:35 pm

I'm starting to get into the book now. I think my issue was that battle scenes just tend to make my eyes glaze over. They're just not my thing at all and having one so early into the story before I developed a connection to the characters or could figure out what's what and who's who sort of threw me initially.

I will say that I so appreciate the list of characters and the maps. I wish more authors would do this! I'm glad now I stuck with it even though my brand new copy of EC's The Wild Hunt has been sitting on my night table calling my name!! :D :p :D
Books to the ceiling,
Books to the sky,
My pile of books is a mile high.
How I love them! How I need them!
I'll have a long beard by the time I read them. --Arnold Lobel

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Tue March 31st, 2009, 11:02 am

I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone for their participation this month, and especially to thank David Blixt for his contribution to the discussion.
My Blog - Reading Adventures

All things Historical Fiction - Historical Tapestry


There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

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cesco
Scribbler
Posts: 36
Joined: January 2009
Location: Chicago

Post by cesco » Thu April 2nd, 2009, 1:30 am

My absolute pleasure, and thanks to everyone for their kind words. I hope all the new readers enjoyed my maiden effort.

Cheers!

annis
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4585
Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Fri March 12th, 2010, 6:23 pm

Just found this cover image for the elusive "Voice of the Falconer" . Wish St Martins would get on with it---

Image

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cesco
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Post by cesco » Fri March 12th, 2010, 9:55 pm

Sorry, Annis. Regardless of the (very attractive) cover, this isn't happening. Would that it were...

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diamondlil
Bibliomaniac
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Post by diamondlil » Sun March 21st, 2010, 12:08 pm

Well, that is disappointing. I was hoping the odd mentions did mean that it was on the cards. Thanks for letting us know.
My Blog - Reading Adventures

All things Historical Fiction - Historical Tapestry


There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

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